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Criminal Law
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Criminal Law uses a two-step process to augment learning, called the applied approach. First, after building a strong foundation from scratch, Criminal Law introduces you to crimes and defenses that have been broken down into separate components. It is so much easier to memorize and comprehend the subject matter when it is simplified this way. However, becoming proficient in the law takes more than just memorization. You must be trained to take the laws you have studied and apply them to various fact patterns. Most students are expected to do this automatically, but application must be seen, experienced, and practiced before it comes naturally. Thus the second step of the applied approach is reviewing examples of the application of law to facts after dissecting and analyzing each legal concept. Some of the examples come from cases, and some are purely fictional. All the examples are memorable, even quirky, so they will stick in your mind and be available when you need them the most (like during an exam). After a few chapters, you will notice that you no longer obsess over an explanation that doesn’t completely make sense the first time you read it—you will just skip to the example. The examples clarify the principles for you, lightening the workload significantly.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
Open Textbook Library
Author:
Lisa Storm
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Criminology
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CC BY-NC
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This course aims to develop a sociological frame to describe and analyze the nature, function, and causes of “crime” and legal institutions in our society. The class begins with a broad overview of criminology as a field and some of the major classic and contemporary theories. The second part of the course reviews empirical works which illustrate, explore, and/or critique these theories. The final part of the course builds on Part 2 and reviews three recent topics of interest in modern criminology.

At the end of the course, you will be able to:
Describe, discuss, and critique arguments about how our society defines crime, why crime occurs, and how our society reacts to and controls behavior deemed “criminal”
Apply criminological theories to social problems of interest
Understand, critique, and/or apply reform and abolitionist frameworks to current key topics related to the nature and role of our criminal legal system

This course was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship, through the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center, CUNY.
Read more about the process of course design here: Criminology - A Critical and Open Approach
https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2021/03/19/criminology-a-critical-and-open-approach/

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Angela LaScala-Gruenewald
Date Added:
06/15/2021
Cybersecurity-Cybercrime-The Legal Environment
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This presentation covers the legal environment of cybercrime to date. It addresses: the challenges of law enforcement; federal government vs. sate jurisdiction of cybercrime; law enforcement department and agencies which handle cybercrime; criminal statutes and privacy statutes.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Law
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Hostos Community College
Author:
Ramson, Amy J
Date Added:
07/04/2020
Ethics in Law Enforcement
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this book, you will examine the moral and ethical issues that exist within law enforcement. This book will also familiarize you with the basic history, principles, and theories of ethics. These concepts will then be applied to the major components of the criminal justice system: policing, the courts, and corrections. Discussion will focus on personal values, individual responsibility, decision making, discretion, and the structure of accountability. Specific topics covered will include core values, codes of conduct, ethical dilemmas, organizational consequences, liability, and the importance of critical thinking. By the end of this book, you will be able to distinguish and critically debate contemporary ethical issues in law enforcement.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Steve McCartney
Date Added:
03/24/2015
How to brief a case
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This is a guide for students on how to brief a case. A student brief is a short summary and analysis of the case prepared for use in classroom discussion. It is a set of notes, presented in a systematic way, in order to sort out the parties, identify the issues, ascertain what was decided, and analyze the reasoning behind decisions made by the courts.
Created by Christopher Pyle, 1982Revised by Prof. Katherine Killoran, Feb. 1999.

Subject:
Law
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Author:
Killoran, Katherine
Lloyd Sealy Library
Pyle, Christopher
Date Added:
01/01/1999
OER Course Conversions at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This website features many of the OER conversion projects completed at John Jay College over the past few years. Class conversions using the Blackboard platform are not represented because of the BB firewall. These are not the actual LibGuides, but content from the LibGuides, using the LibGuide platform for access. The entire website is public.

The left navigation panel displays the academic departments with the overview and objective of the department. Also, navigation to the specific departmental classes, with corresponding OER content, are found at the bottom of the academic department pages. You can also directly navigate to the specific converted class, by clicking on the course title under the department tab. When clicking on a specific class (e.g. Science 110), the link takes you to the course description, learning outcomes of the course and a link to the OER content for the specific course. The OER content features creative commons OER Textbooks, vetted open Internet sites, academic journal articles and library owned streaming video, requiring a login to the John Jay Library. Each academic department features a link to "Discussion and Comments". In addition all pages have navigation arrows to previous pages and next pages. On many of the OER content pages, the class calendar by week is featured with links to the reading assignments. In addition to the specific OER content by class, there is a link at the top of the main page to access generic OER by subject and/or topic.

Subject:
Computer Science
Technology
Art History
Higher Education
History, Law, Politics
General Law
Biology
Anthropology
Criminal Justice
Ethnic Studies
Psychology
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Author:
Vee Herrington
Date Added:
05/18/2021
PRLS 2505: Latinxs in the Criminal Justice Complex
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This is an inter and trans-disciplinary course, which has two main objectives. The first is to serve as an introduction into the current realities and challenges of the LatinX community within the criminal justice complex in the United States. The course seeks to critically examine the misconceptions and realities of the LatinX community within the larger discussion of mass incarceration and prison reform in the United States. Close attention will also be paid to the use of criminalization as a form of social control and the proliferation of regulations, ordinances, and legislative acts that give legal form to such methods of discipline and punishment. The course will address dynamics and phenomena of racial profiling; juvenile justice; drug criminalization; and the intersection of immigration law with criminal law. In concluding, the course will shift to understanding and connecting the prison-industrial complex to what the future holds for marginalized communities within the current movement and crisis of global capital.

The course also seeks to improve your skills in critical reading, writing, and thinking. Paper assignments and essay exams will provide opportunities to develop your own interpretations systematically and polish your writing skills.

While there undoubtedly exists an infinite research agenda when it comes to the study mass incarceration and the ongoing challenges of the LatinX community within the criminal justice system of the United States, it is only possible [in 15 weeks] to cover a limited surface/amount of such complicated history and realities of these topics. However, I have provided a list of suggested/recommended readings for additional literature to be consulted.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Reynaldo Ortiz-Minaya
Date Added:
03/11/2021
PRLS 2505: Latinxs in the Criminal Justice Complex (Aja)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This is an inter and trans-disciplinary course, which has two main objectives. The first is to serve as an introduction into the current realities and challenges of the LatinX community within the criminal justice complex in the United States. The course seeks to critically examine the misconceptions and realities of the LatinX community within the larger discussion of mass incarceration and prison reform in the United States. Close attention will also be paid to the use of criminalization as a form of social control and the proliferation of regulations, ordinances, and legislative acts that give legal form to such methods of discipline and punishment. The course will address dynamics and phenomena of racial profiling; juvenile justice; drug criminalization; and the intersection of immigration law with criminal law. In concluding, the course will shift to understanding and connecting the prison-industrial complex to what the future holds for marginalized communities within the current movement and crisis of global capital.

The course also seeks to improve your skills in critical reading, writing, and thinking. Paper assignments will provide opportunities to develop your own interpretations systematically and polish your writing skills.

While there undoubtedly exists an infinite research agenda when it comes to the study mass incarceration and the ongoing challenges of the LatinX community within the criminal justice system of the United States, it is only possible [in 15 weeks] to cover a limited surface/amount of such complicated history and realities of these topics. However, provided is a list of suggested/recommended readings for additional literature to be consulted.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Alan Aja
Amy Wolfe
Date Added:
03/08/2021
Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law, Fall 2014
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, and the impact of counter-terrorism policy on domestic police practices.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ghachem, Malick
Date Added:
01/01/2014
Tech Policy and Legal Theory Syllabus
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CC BY-NC
Rating

Technology has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. Currently, virtually all business industries are powered by large quantities of data. The potential as well as actual uses of business data, which oftentimes includes personal user data, raise complex issues of informed consent and data protection. This course will explore many of these complex issues, with the goal of guiding students into thinking about tech policy from a broad ethical perspective as well as preparing students to responsibly conduct themselves in different areas and industries in a world growingly dominated by technology.

Subject:
Engineering
Business and Communication
Management
Educational Technology
Law
Social Science
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Baruch College
Author:
Lev-Aretz, Yafit
Packin, Nizan
Date Added:
08/15/2020
Toni Cade Bambara Playlist by Sonia Adams
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This playlist and handout include works by (and various quotations and media related to) Toni Cade Bambara.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Education
Elementary Education
Higher Education
Language Education (ESL)
Special Education
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Criminal Justice
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Social Work
Sociology
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Bibliography
Author:
Christina Katopodis
Date Added:
03/09/2021
WGST 3550 Prison Abolition: History, Theory and Practice
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WGST 3550 Special Topics in Social Science: As mass uprisings against state violence have continued unabated since the police murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and Rayshard Brooks, bipartisan consensus has coalesced around the need to end mass incarceration and reform prisons and policing. Simultaneously, the revolutionary movement to abolish prisons and policing entirely has gained momentum (again), drawing on a lineage of Black freedom struggles, from the movement to abolish slavery to Black Lives Matter. Yet, many are unfamiliar with prison abolition or concerned about its impacts on their safety. In this course, students will engage with the contemporary prison abolition movement as both a vision for the future and a concrete set of strategies to create safety and undo incarceration in the present. With New York City experiencing a resurgence in brutal broken windows policing while the city is poised to build four new jails over the next six years (and maybe shut down the notorious Rikers Island jail complex), this course will provide Black feminist insight into a contemporary political fight with profound consequences for the lives of working class communities of color in NYC.

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
U.S. History
Social Science
Criminal Justice
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Nadja Eisenberg-Guyot
Date Added:
09/08/2020