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21st Century American Government and Politics  v.1.0
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Textbook focusing on American Government and the specificities of the American political system. In covering American government and politics, this text:
• introduces the intricacies of the Constitution, the complexities of federalism, the meanings of civil liberties, and the conflicts over civil rights;
• explains how people are socialized to politics, acquire and express opinions, and participate in political life;
• describes interest groups, political parties, and elections—the intermediaries that link people to government and politics;
• details the branches of government and how they operate; and
• shows how policies are made and affect people’s lives.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
2012 Book Archive
Author:
David L. Paletz
Diana Owen
Timothy E. Cook
Date Added:
12/29/2012
21st Century Ecopoetics and Ecotheory
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Ecopoetics is the study of literature that is concerned with ecology and nature. However, beyond just literature about nature, this course will examine how ecology and nature have become complicated in the 21st century, the age of the Anthropocene, the age of the climate crisis and the 6th mass extinction (don’t worry, we will define these and other key terms).
In the 21st century, humans are now confronted with a growing awareness of their destructive impact on the earth, its environments, and its human and non-human inhabitants. In this class we will examine how ecology and nature have become complicated in the 21st century, alongside many other questions that appear when we start to unravel that complication:
What do we even mean by nature? How do we think about interconnection? Interconnection between whom and what? How are authors writing about the climate crisis, ecological justice, and non-human beings? How can the study of ecopoetics actually help us think about the complicated, interconnected challenges of the twenty-first century at large?
We’ll look at poems written from the perspective of non-humans; we’ll consider those who have come before us and those who’ll come after; we’ll look at and think about the (supply) chain of associations between you and a cup of coffee; write along the path of NYC’s watershed and waterways from source to tap; and invent new words to describe the challenges of this new century.
Ultimately, in this class, we will discuss the profound questions raised by the study of ecopoetics, questions of what it means to be human, to live in an organized society, on a finite earth, now, and 100 years from now.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Balun, Robert
Date Added:
07/01/2021
AIDS and Poverty in Africa, Spring 2005
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This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bobbili, Raja
Date Added:
01/01/2005
ANT-3700 - Introduction to Anthropology
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Movement away from the textbook model has potential to foster equitable access to course materials as well as reduce textbook costs for students. As such, transition to a zero cost/OER classroom included the curation of open access scholarly literature to cover the four-field approach presently taught in introductory anthropology courses.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Kingsborough Community College
Author:
Pashkovskiy, Igor
Date Added:
01/01/2021
ANT-37 Open Assignments
Read the Fine Print
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The following activities use open educational practices to engage students in active and shared learning. The first section discusses a model for creating a more open syllabus, the second section is an assignment where students create a collaborative bulletin board, and the third section is an activity where students first create presentations that are added to an online “video text.” All of these activities are buildable and can be shared with new classes over time, building a larger repository of class materials that are based on students' active participation and authoritative knowledge. While these are intended for an Introductory class in Anthropology, they can be adapted for a variety of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Kingsborough Community College
Author:
Siegel, Jill L
Date Added:
03/07/2021
ANTH101: Free textbook and hub for teaching cultural anthropology
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* a free alternative to expensive Introduction to Cultural Anthropology textbooks
* includes a full textbook and several original videos
* includes 10 "challenges" (assignments)
* a hub of original and found resources for teaching and learning anthropology
* a “connected course” of many faculty around the world sharing instructional materials
* an open course freely available to anyone online
* an emerging producer of original anthropological videos and other digital content

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Anthropology for Everyone
Author:
Michael Wesch
Ryan Klataske
Tom Woodward
Date Added:
03/01/2019
ANTH 101: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
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Introduction to Cultural Anthropology explores fundamental questions about what it means to be human through a comparative study of different cultures. Anthropology seeks to understand how culture both shapes societies, from the smallest island in the South Pacific to the largest Asian metropolis, and affects the way institutions work, from scientific laboratories to Christian mega-churches. It provides a framework for analyzing diverse facets of human experience such as gender, ethnicity, language, politics, economics, and art.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
School of Professional Studies
Author:
CUNY School of Professional Studies
Date Added:
04/01/2021
ANTH 1400/CLAS 3210: Digging the Past – for the Anthropology Department of Brooklyn College
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How do we know what we believe to know about the past? This class will dive into this question by introducing students to archaeology, a sub-discipline of anthropology that explores the human past through materiality. An overview of archaeological method and theory and current approaches to the practice. Topics will include history of the discipline, how societies were organized, subsistence patterns, technology and trade, and analytical approaches. In addition, the course will explore some of the present issues within the field of archaeology. Class will use lectures, class discussions, reading materials, visual media, and guest lectures to explore the topics discussed above.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amanda Schreiner
David Milley
Emily Fairey
Kelly Britt
Date Added:
09/20/2022
ANTH 2140: Anthropology of Food
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As organisms, humans need to eat to live. As cultural beings, eating and food provide some of the most basic ways in which humans define themselves. One group’s delicacies are another’s taboos, and what defines comfort foods and favorite dishes shifts drastically across cultures and individuals. Eating and food are simultaneously profoundly personal, deeply cultural, inherently economic, and increasingly political. This course is organized around the production, circulation, and consumption of food, and the political and economic effects of those processes. Students will learn to use food as an analytical entry point for thinking about relationships among humans and with non-human beings.

Subject:
Agriculture
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Colin Pitet
Date Added:
03/08/2021
ANTH 2140 Anthropology of Food
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“Eating and food provide some of the most basic ways in which humans define themselves. A cross-cultural consideration of nutrition, food production and food as social practice will help to define the place of food and eating in basic human practice.” (Brooklyn College Course Catalog, 2022)

Food is an essential component for the survival of any living organism. Such as the case with humans, that in order to live, they need to eat. Food gives us an opportunity to see the similarities and differences among cultural groups, one group’s delicacies are another’s taboos. Why is food inherently part of culture? This is one of the main questions we will attempt to respond to in this course. Food is part of an economic system, but also part of a political and symbolic imaginary. In this course, we will cover an array of topics that include: food production, exchange, and consumption; power, politics, migration, labor, race, gender, space, language, nutrition, and eating. This experience will give us an opportunity to see how intrinsic food and eating are, not only for the survival of our species, but as part of culture and society.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Joseph A. Torres-González
Date Added:
09/20/2022
ANTH 3135: Home The American Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives
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This course engages students in the diversity of American urban life and introduces various modes of analyzing socio-cultural scenes, communities, and urban institutions. In the first part of the course, we will lay the foundations for understanding urban processes and communities. We will examine the racial and ethnic diversity in cities and the ways people understand and cope with being in an environment filled with "strangers". We will develop an understanding of urban political economy and the effects of inequality and economic strain on urban life. In the second part of the course, we will focus on the effects of globalization, post-industrial decline, and post-modernism on cities. In this section, we will focus on the production and consumption of urban spaces. We will look at the ways American cities have developed and changed as well as the competing views and political contestations behind these transformations.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Reference
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Christa Paterline
Date Added:
09/03/2021
ANTH 3360: Language Loss: Culture, Politics and Self
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Libguide OER for Prof. Jill Cavanaugh's course: ANTH 3360: Language Loss: Culture, Politics and Self. What does it mean to lose or risk losing your language? What is the value of language, to speakers, to experts like anthropologists, to humanity more broadly? This course explores answers to these questions through thinking about language as a cultural practice and object, a political activity and topic, and something that is deeply entwined with speakers’ senses of self. We will consider case studies from the US immigrant experience as well as cases of language endangerment and loss around the globe. To analyze these issues more immediately, students will do a research project about a language in Brooklyn, which will involve mapping ethnographic research, photographic, interviews, and other evidence to tell a story about a particular language’s current vitality

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Jill Cavanaugh
Date Added:
12/08/2020
ANTH 3420 Urban Archaeology OER
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About Urban Archaeology
Archaeology is undoubtedly most famous for its exploration and discovery of “wonderful things” from the deep past in “exotic” places: Tutankhamun’s tomb! Lost Maya cities! Archaeologists are also keen sift through and ask questions of ancient garbage: What do these tools at Stonehenge suggest about Neolithic and Bronze Age social networks? These discoveries and questions are important for understanding where we came from. However, more and more archaeologists are turning their attention, their theory, and their methods to the recent past and contemporary worlds. This course explores a body of work that advances these efforts in American urban places and considers debates that make the more recent American urban world its object. The course then asks students to assess and evaluate various aspects of American urban life through exposure to a broad range of archaeological case studies.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Kelly Britt
Paul L Hebert
Date Added:
03/15/2021
ANTH 3520/ PRLS 3210 Latin America
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In this course, we will focus on a survey of topics that will help us hone the discussion on cultural production, manifestations, and contestations. The course will provide an interdisciplinary perspective grounded in Anthropology, but also including materials from other fields in the social sciences, such as History, and Cultural Studies. The course will also introduce students to the four-field approach in Anthropology (Cultural Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, and Linguistics). The geographical region that will be covered in this class will be South America. This will provide students with a context to discuss topics that include culture, race, and ethnicity, connecting it to the main arguments around cultural difference, identity, political economy, political economy, health, food, environment, language, politics, gender, sports, and religion.

Subject:
History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Joseph A. Torres-González
Date Added:
09/20/2022
Abnormal Language, Fall 2004
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Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain.

Subject:
Linguistics
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hirsch, Christopher
Wexler, Kenneth
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Accessibility: Disabilities Treasure Hunt
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This is a treasure hunt game that simulates various disabilities and gives a sense of how frustrating non-accessible content can be for people with disabilities. Suitable for a general audience, no programming experience necessary.
An editable copy is also given, along with ideas about how to make it more accessible.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Life Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Kletenik, Devorah
Date Added:
01/01/2021