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20th Century Art
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Examination of the cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in Europe and the United States, surveying the artwork of Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Op-Art, and Modern and Postmodern architecture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
ANTH 2140: Anthropology of Food
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As organisms, humans need to eat to live. As cultural beings, eating and food provide some of the most basic ways in which humans define themselves. One group’s delicacies are another’s taboos, and what defines comfort foods and favorite dishes shifts drastically across cultures and individuals. Eating and food are simultaneously profoundly personal, deeply cultural, inherently economic, and increasingly political. This course is organized around the production, circulation, and consumption of food, and the political and economic effects of those processes. Students will learn to use food as an analytical entry point for thinking about relationships among humans and with non-human beings.

Subject:
Agriculture
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Colin Pitet
Date Added:
03/08/2021
ANTH 3135: Home The American Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives
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This course engages students in the diversity of American urban life and introduces various modes of analyzing socio-cultural scenes, communities, and urban institutions. In the first part of the course, we will lay the foundations for understanding urban processes and communities. We will examine the racial and ethnic diversity in cities and the ways people understand and cope with being in an environment filled with "strangers". We will develop an understanding of urban political economy and the effects of inequality and economic strain on urban life. In the second part of the course, we will focus on the effects of globalization, post-industrial decline, and post-modernism on cities. In this section, we will focus on the production and consumption of urban spaces. We will look at the ways American cities have developed and changed as well as the competing views and political contestations behind these transformations.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Reference
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Christa Paterline
Date Added:
09/03/2021
ANTH 3360: Language Loss: Culture, Politics and Self
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Libguide OER for Prof. Jill Cavanaugh's course: ANTH 3360: Language Loss: Culture, Politics and Self. What does it mean to lose or risk losing your language? What is the value of language, to speakers, to experts like anthropologists, to humanity more broadly? This course explores answers to these questions through thinking about language as a cultural practice and object, a political activity and topic, and something that is deeply entwined with speakers’ senses of self. We will consider case studies from the US immigrant experience as well as cases of language endangerment and loss around the globe. To analyze these issues more immediately, students will do a research project about a language in Brooklyn, which will involve mapping ethnographic research, photographic, interviews, and other evidence to tell a story about a particular language’s current vitality

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Jill Cavanaugh
Date Added:
12/08/2020
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Bleeke)
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Examine the history of visual art across world cultures from the fourth millennium BCE to the twentieth century CE. Starting with the early civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia, we will explore the ways in which art has shaped, and been shaped by,the development of empires, cities, religions, politics, and social life through history. Our focus will be on major monuments and artworks that are exemplary of their time and place, but we will also look at lesser known objects to nuance and deepen our historical understanding. Classes will be primarily lecture-based, with time for discussion and questions as we explore the issues raised by both the artworks and the required readings.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Jeremy Bleeke
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Carroll)
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An introduction to the history of art, emphasizing visual literacy in an historical context. Major works of art and architecture, drawn from a wide range of world cultures and periods from ancient times to the present, will be explored.

Students will learn to analyze works of art critically from both an historical and an interpretative point of view; in addition, they will gain an understanding of the importance of cultural diversity through exposure to the arts of many different times and places.
Students will have extensive practice in articulating aesthetic judgments effectively in spoken and written form.
Students will learn how to draw upon the cultural riches of New York City to enhance their learning within and outside the classroom.
Identify unique characteristics of several artistic traditions, and recognize and analyze the differences among the major periods, artists, genres, and theories of art.
Use terms of art historical analysis correctly and be able to apply them to unfamiliar works.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Reading
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Anna Carroll
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Fabris)
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CC BY-NC-SA
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What is art? Why is it created? What is its meaning? These are some of the questions we will ponder in this class. This course serves as an introduction to art, with an emphasis on visual literacy and historical context. We will explore major works of art and architecture, drawn from a wide range of world cultures and periods, from ancient times to the present.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Rita Fabris
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Greenberg)
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An introduction to the study of art and its history from ancient times to the present. In this course, we will study the history of Western art, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of contemporary times.

The information presented in this course will provide you with the tools to recognize important works of art and historical styles, as well as to understand the historical context and cultural developments of Western art history through the end of the modern period. Introductory readings paired with detailed lectures will provide you with a well-rounded sense of the history, art, and culture of the West up through modern times.

At the end of this course, you will be able to identify key works of art and artistic periods in Western history. You will also be able to discuss the development of stylistic movements and relate those developments to important historical events.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Natalie Greenberg
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (McCreight)
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Introductory course offers various windows into the development of human expression through the arts, spanning prehistory to the 21st century. Using art from diverse cultures and time periods, we will explore the way that art functions within broader societal trends and ideas, both reacting to and influencing major historical moments. Students will become comfortable with speaking and writing about specific art-historical styles, issues and key terms, and be able to approach art in both a formal/visual and historic context. They will also learn how to navigate and explore their own specific interests within the history of art and become aware of resources that will guide them to further complexify their own research and writing.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Maura McCreight
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Simon 2019)
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Introduce students to major works of art from cultures around the world, spanning ancient to modern periods. We will focus on developing skills of formal analysis by closely studying works of painting, sculpture, and architecture. We will also discuss the objects chosen in their historical, political, sociological, and religious contexts in order to better understand their meaning and significance.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Smilow)
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CC BY-NC-SA
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What is art? Why does it matter? This course presents a general global view of art history through slide lectures, class discussions, video resources and a museum visit. It selectively surveys the visual arts, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of today, covering concurrent historical periods in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

Using art from diverse cultures and time periods, we will explore the way that art functions within broader societal trends and ideas, both reacting to and influencing major historical moments.

You will become comfortable with speaking and writing about specific art historical styles, issues and key terms, and be able to approach art in both a formal/visual and historic context. You will also learn how to navigate and explore your own specific interests within the history of art and become aware of resources that will guide you to further your own academic pursuit

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Reading
Syllabus
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Lindsay Smilow
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 3066: MODERN ART
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This course will examine the art of the first half of the twentieth century. We will consider the works studies within their relevant political and cultural contexts. Topics addressed will include the rise of abstraction, the liberation of color, the interest in the subconscious. We will begin with precedents to Modernism in the 19th Century and will conclude with WWII. Additionally, students will learn methods of art historical research and develop skills of visual analysis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
06/18/2020
ART 3094/7024G-Postwar Art: From World War II to 1989
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Home OER for Mona Hadler's ART3094-Postwar Art: From World War II to 1989. Twentieth-century art from World War II to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Major movements include Abstract Expressionism, Fluxus and performance, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Postmodernism. Major artists include Pollock, Rauschenberg, Hesse, Serra, Richter, Warhol, Sherman. Issues of gender, race and politics are integrated into the entire curriculum. For document passwords, please contact Mona Hadler or the Brooklyn College Library.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Mona Hadler
Date Added:
12/08/2020
ART 3134/7142 Subject, Creator, Consumer: Women and African Art (Richards)
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Chris Richards' course at Brooklyn College offers a thematic examination of African art with an emphasis on the importance of women, a group recognized for their influence on and creation of artistic forms, yet seldom the exclusive focus of academic inquiry. Students will examine a diverse range of visual art forms throughout the African continent, in both historical and contemporary contexts. Although the course is organized thematically, students will be encouraged to interrogate these categories, exploring how specific art forms can fit into multiple categories. The thematic structure will allow students to compare similar art forms from different African cultures, such as pottery and masquerades. Lastly, this course will encourage students to question academic sources for potential biases, particularly in regards to the representation of women.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Chris Richards
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 7184G Museum Education
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Entails exploration of a variety of methodological approaches to object-based learning within a museum setting. Our goal is the achievement of a comprehensive understanding of methods in museum education.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Chris Richards
Date Added:
03/10/2021
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
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CC BY-SA
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This CUNY Student Edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is intended to provide a free-to-use, reliable text for students and instructors. It is published under a Creative Commons license which allows almost unlimited free-use. The text is based on the first American edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, published in 1885. CUNY student editions are created and maintained by a community of student-scholars. Join them on GitHub: https://github.com/CUNY-Student-Editions

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Mark Twain
Date Added:
03/28/2019
Advertising and Promotion (Business 306)
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CC BY
Rating

The purpose of this course is to lead students in an exploration of fundamental advertising principles and the role advertising plays in the promotional mix. You will learn where advertising fits in the Marketing Mix, also known as the four Ps: Product, Price, Place, and Promotion. Although some consider all promotion synonymous with advertising, you will learn the unique characteristics that separate advertising from other forms of promotional communication. You will revisit some familiar marketing concepts within a new framework, approaching the subject from the advertiserŐs perspective.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Marketing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
African-American Literature
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary production of African American authors from the Colonial period to the current day, examining the cultural, historical, and political contexts of the literature, as well as how the issues of gender, race, and class affect the production and meaning of these works. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the cultural influences and the development of African American literature; analyze the evolution of African American literature from an oral to a literary tradition; define the functions of African American literature from its inception in the period of slavery to the contemporary period; identify the major authors and/or literary works in the various literary periods and movements (Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism, and modernism; Black Arts; and the Contemporary Period). This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 411)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019