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AFN 121 Yoruba Tradition and Culture
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A class presentation as part of the discussion on West Africa about the instructor’s Yoruba Heritage, Research, Tradition and Culture in the AFN 121 course: History of African Civilizations on April 20, 2021.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Religious Studies
History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Alapo, Remi
Date Added:
04/01/2021
AMER 200: American History and Culture
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CC BY-NC
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Explores race, class, and gender in American history and culture. Secondary source material by scholars of American Studies and primary source materials in a variety of genres, including music, poetry, art, and material culture, convey the ways in which American culture has been shaped by and has helped to shape ideas of race, class, and gender.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
School of Professional Studies
Author:
CUNY School of Professional Studies
Date Added:
04/01/2021
ARTD 1035: The Development of the Silk Road – CUNY Brooklyn College
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This site was developed as an open educational resource (OER) for the CUNY / Brooklyn College course, ARTD 3105 The Development of the Silk Road, taught by Professors Jennifer L. Ball and Shuming Lu.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Jennifer L. Ball
Shuming Lu
Date Added:
02/22/2022
ARTD 3014/ARTD 7015G: Across Byzantium: Arts and Architectures of Empire
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Course Description: In 324CE, Constantine the Great moved the capital of the Roman Empire to Constantinople, creating what scholars now refer to as the Byzantine Empire. From 324 to 1453, the Byzantine Empire existed as a major power in the Mediterranean World. Its artists negotiated its Roman past with its Christian present, innovating new modes of depicting the world in art and architecture. In this class we will examine works from the early through late Byzantine periods, questioning Byzantine identity in the arts. Drawing from a wide geographic range, we will consider the Byzantine Empire as a site of cross-cultural interaction and exchange, and ask how art objects expressed the diversity and power of the Empire.

Subject:
Art History
Ancient History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Date Added:
02/19/2022
ARTD 3015: The Development of the Silk Road
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An exploration of the art and architecture of the Silk Road across Afro-Eurasia, from the Han Dynasty (2nd century BCE) until the spread of colonialism (17th century). Some discussion of the contemporary Silk Road will also be included. Subjects covered: the history of art, the rise and interaction of Islam and Buddhism, and the economic and diplomatic context that facilitated the development and expansion of the Silk Road, the Silk Road today.

Subject:
Art History
Ancient History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Anna Carroll
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/07/2022
Advanced Energy Policy
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Energy policy is typically evolutionary as opposed to revolutionary. We can look to historical policies to understand how we've inherited the policies governing our energy use today. But looking backward only tells us part of the story. In the face of climate change, we need to look ahead and instead envision a more revolutionary change to our energy systems and the policies that govern them. This class takes you on that journey to energy policies past, present, and future. We look at the political realities of addressing climate change at various scales of governance and work together to craft our own ideal scenarios of what a responsible energy future will be.

Subject:
Environmental Studies
Business and Communication
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Brandi Robinson
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
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CC BY-SA
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This CUNY Student Edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is intended to provide a free-to-use, reliable text for students and instructors. It is published under a Creative Commons license which allows almost unlimited free-use. The text is based on the first American edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, published in 1885. CUNY student editions are created and maintained by a community of student-scholars. Join them on GitHub: https://github.com/CUNY-Student-Editions

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Mark Twain
Date Added:
03/28/2019
African American History to Emancipation, AKA: History in the Early Modern Atlantic World
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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African American History to Emancipation explores the history, memory, and representation of enslavement and abolition in the United States. The key questions we are posing are: how do we recover the unrecoverable and how do we remember the “unrememberable?” We will consider the history of enslavement in the Atlantic World, its legacies in the United States, the gaps in our knowledge, the global trauma of Atlantic World Slavery, and contemporary and contemporaneous representations. Key themes include: the formation of the Atlantic World, enslavement, the transatlantic slave trade, slavery in the United States, the formation of African American cultures, the emergence of race and racism, resistance and rebellion, abolition, emancipation and the meaning of freedom.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Woodard, Laurie
Date Added:
01/01/2021
The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries, Spring 2011
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This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey S.
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019