CUNY Arts and Humanities

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21st Century Ecopoetics (Selected Topics in Literature and Science)
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Ecopoetics is the study of literature that is concerned with ecology and nature. However, beyond just literature about nature, this course will examine how ecology and nature have become complicated in the 21st century, the age of the Anthropocene, the age of the climate crisis and the 6th mass extinction (don‰Ûªt worry, we will define these and other key terms).
In the 21st century, humans are now confronted with a growing awareness of their destructive impact on the earth, its environments, and its human and non-human inhabitants. In this class we will examine how ecology and nature have become complicated in the 21st century, alongside many other questions that appear when we start to unravel that complication:
What do we even mean by nature? How do we think about interconnection? Interconnection between whom and what? How are authors writing about the climate crisis, ecological justice, and non-human beings? How can the study of ecopoetics actually help us think about the complicated, interconnected challenges of the twenty-first century at large?
We‰Ûªll look at poems written from the perspective of non-humans; we‰Ûªll consider those who have come before us and those who‰Ûªll come after; we‰Ûªll look at and think about the (supply) chain of associations between you and a cup of coffee; write along the path of NYC‰Ûªs watershed and waterways from source to tap; and invent new words to describe the challenges of this new century.
Ultimately, in this class, we will discuss the profound questions raised by the study of ecopoetics, questions of what it means to be human, to live in an organized society, on a finite earth, now, and 100 years from now.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Balun, Robert
Date Added:
07/01/2020
21st Century Ecopoetics and Ecotheory
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Ecopoetics is the study of literature that is concerned with ecology and nature. However, beyond just literature about nature, this course will examine how ecology and nature have become complicated in the 21st century, the age of the Anthropocene, the age of the climate crisis and the 6th mass extinction (don’t worry, we will define these and other key terms).
In the 21st century, humans are now confronted with a growing awareness of their destructive impact on the earth, its environments, and its human and non-human inhabitants. In this class we will examine how ecology and nature have become complicated in the 21st century, alongside many other questions that appear when we start to unravel that complication:
What do we even mean by nature? How do we think about interconnection? Interconnection between whom and what? How are authors writing about the climate crisis, ecological justice, and non-human beings? How can the study of ecopoetics actually help us think about the complicated, interconnected challenges of the twenty-first century at large?
We’ll look at poems written from the perspective of non-humans; we’ll consider those who have come before us and those who’ll come after; we’ll look at and think about the (supply) chain of associations between you and a cup of coffee; write along the path of NYC’s watershed and waterways from source to tap; and invent new words to describe the challenges of this new century.
Ultimately, in this class, we will discuss the profound questions raised by the study of ecopoetics, questions of what it means to be human, to live in an organized society, on a finite earth, now, and 100 years from now.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Balun, Robert
Date Added:
07/01/2021
AAS 232 African Civilizations
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Exploration of the development of African civilizations from the origin of humankind to the present day. Their contributions to the development of the continent and the major world civilizations. The course carries us through Africa‰Ûªs major civilizations clusters, and offers a comparative survey extending from the Nile Valley Civilizations, through the Niger River Civilizations, to the Bantu cluster comprising the Central, Southern and Swahili Civilizations. Particular attention is paid to religious and philosophical beliefs, literature and the arts, social and political organization, economic, scientific, and technological developments. Also highlighted are contributions of African women in the history and development of civilization, as well as contributions of Africa and Africans to the World.
The full course site is available at https://aas232.commons.gc.cuny.edu

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Ngo-Ngijol Banoum, Bertrade
Date Added:
10/01/2019
AAS 267 African American Literature
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A survey course that will take us from the early days of enslavement to the present. We will read, analyze, and discuss literary texts written by African Americans, paying particular attention to the political, historical and social context that informs these texts.
The full course site is available at https://aas267.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Rice, Anne
Date Added:
04/01/2018
AFN 121 Yoruba Tradition and Culture
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A class presentation as part of the discussion on West Africa about the instructor’s Yoruba Heritage, Research, Tradition and Culture in the AFN 121 course: History of African Civilizations on April 20, 2021.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Religious Studies
History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Alapo, Remi
Date Added:
04/01/2021
AFN 122 Course Design Worksheet and Content: an anti - racist and culturally inclusive pedagogy
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Studying (and teaching) such a vast and diverse continent can be challenging. Because no introductory course can claim to be fully comprehensive, this one will explore several themes in the history of Africa and its peoples that the professor finds important and noteworthy. The readings, lectures, films, and activities will consider broad regions of the continent, and the goals of this course include both knowledge and enjoyment. You should come away from this class with a new appreciation for Africa and a general idea of its history from 1500 to the present.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Higher Education
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Alapo, Oluremi "Remi"
Date Added:
07/01/2022
AFRS 101: Ethnology of Africa
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Applies the fundamental methods and concepts of cultural anthropology to the study of sub-Saharan African societies and nations, with emphasis on the impact of slavery and colonialism, current problems of economic and political development, and Africa's emerging place in 21st-century global interactions. Exploration of histories, politics, economics, family structures, gender, power, and health in different African cultures through analysis of ethnographies, text chapters, generalist summaries, historical research, news accounts, specialist articles, and literature.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
School of Professional Studies
Author:
CUNY School of Professional Studies
Date Added:
04/01/2021
ARH 141 Introduction to the History of Modern Art
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A study of the principles of art applied to visual forms, with emphasis on modern art of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Europe and the United States.
The full course site is available at https://arh141.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Jordan, Sharon L
Date Added:
04/01/2018
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Simon 2019)
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Introduce students to major works of art from cultures around the world, spanning ancient to modern periods. We will focus on developing skills of formal analysis by closely studying works of painting, sculpture, and architecture. We will also discuss the objects chosen in their historical, political, sociological, and religious contexts in order to better understand their meaning and significance.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 201: Arts and Civilization I
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Introduces art and the academic discipline of art history. Using the discipline’s technical vocabulary, analyzes the standard visual, material and symbolic components of art. Addresses cultural products created from the Neolithic through to the end of the Western Middle Ages. Analyzes the purpose of art. Examines painting, drawing, sculpture and architecture in historical, political and cultural context. Analyzes art's function within society. Critiques how successive movements and styles are indebted to the past and to influences from other sources. Introduces key movements, important artworks and the biographies of individual artists.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
School of Professional Studies
Author:
CUNY School of Professional Studies
Date Added:
04/01/2021
ART 3062: Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism
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Art 3062 focusses on major artists and themes in European art, mainly French, during the second half of the nineteenth century. Art and literature and new optical theories of color and light are explored. Questions of politics, gender, race, colonialism, exhibition strategies, urbanism and the landscape are problematized. Major artists include, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Lewis, Monet, Cassatt, Morisot, Cezanne, Seurat, Van Gogh, Gauguin

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Mona Hadler
Date Added:
04/12/2021
ART 3066: MODERN ART
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This course will examine the art of the first half of the twentieth century. We will consider the works studies within their relevant political and cultural contexts. Topics addressed will include the rise of abstraction, the liberation of color, the interest in the subconscious. We will begin with precedents to Modernism in the 19th Century and will conclude with WWII. Additionally, students will learn methods of art historical research and develop skills of visual analysis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
06/18/2020
ART 3094/7024G-Postwar Art: From World War II to 1989
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Home OER for Mona Hadler's ART3094-Postwar Art: From World War II to 1989. Twentieth-century art from World War II to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Major movements include Abstract Expressionism, Fluxus and performance, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Postmodernism. Major artists include Pollock, Rauschenberg, Hesse, Serra, Richter, Warhol, Sherman. Issues of gender, race and politics are integrated into the entire curriculum. For document passwords, please contact Mona Hadler or the Brooklyn College Library.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Mona Hadler
Date Added:
12/08/2020
ART 3134/7142 Subject, Creator, Consumer: Women and African Art (Richards)
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Chris Richards' course at Brooklyn College offers a thematic examination of African art with an emphasis on the importance of women, a group recognized for their influence on and creation of artistic forms, yet seldom the exclusive focus of academic inquiry. Students will examine a diverse range of visual art forms throughout the African continent, in both historical and contemporary contexts. Although the course is organized thematically, students will be encouraged to interrogate these categories, exploring how specific art forms can fit into multiple categories. The thematic structure will allow students to compare similar art forms from different African cultures, such as pottery and masquerades. Lastly, this course will encourage students to question academic sources for potential biases, particularly in regards to the representation of women.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Chris Richards
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 3164 (undergrad) / 7097G (graduate) Architecture and Urban Design in New York City (Simon)
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ART 3164 (undergrad) course will explore the history of architecture and urbanism in New York City from the colonial period through the present day. We will study well-known monuments along with lesser-known but important works, and consider the political, cultural, and economic factors that fueled the development of New York’s built environment. This course will situate the architecture of New York City within the broader discourse of American architectural history, and will examine the impact that New York had on nationwide architectural trends. Classroom lectures will be supplemented regularly with site visits across the city.

ART 7097 History of Architecture and Urbanism in New York City
This course will explore the history of architecture and urbanism in New York City from the colonial period through the present day. We will study well-known monuments along with lesser-known but important works, and consider the political, cultural, and economic factors that fueled the development of New York’s built environment. This course will situate the architecture of New York City within the broader discourse of American architectural history, and will examine the impact that New York had on nationwide architectural trends. Classroom lectures will be supplemented regularly with site visits across the city.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Bibliography
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 3169/Grad ARTD 7165 Global Contemporary Art: From 1945 to the Present
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Global Contemporary Art from the Postwar/Postcolonial era to the present. It will consider the historical and contemporary contexts of the countries and artists discussed as well as theoretical issues of globalism, diaspora, and hybridity. While it would be impossible to cover all of global contemporary art in a course such as this, case studies involving different artists and regions will afford the opportunity to seriously investigate different artistic movements and cultures and address global and diasporic issues.

The course will look at the postwar or postcolonial periods in the various countries and then address more contemporary art that is global and often diasporic.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Mona Hadler
Date Added:
03/15/2021
ART 3700: Politics of Display, Approaches to Non-Western Art
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This class is an introduction to non-Western art. We will study the unique aesthetics and the basic ideas behind the arts made in the Islamic world, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and their diaspora. The course will consider the exhibition as a politicized arena and determine how particular ways of selecting and displaying the artworks or their lack of representation in museums can influence our knowledge. Students are encouraged to choose images and write their papers to communicate their ideas about the four focal areas and their diaspora. They are encouraged to think about how their knowledge and worldview can complement the existing world.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Kingsborough Community College
Author:
Yamamura, Midori
Date Added:
06/30/2021
ART 7184G Museum Education
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Entails exploration of a variety of methodological approaches to object-based learning within a museum setting. Our goal is the achievement of a comprehensive understanding of methods in museum education.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Chris Richards
Date Added:
03/10/2021