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Astronomy 141
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Welcome to Astronomy 141. Through this course you’ll have an understanding of the sky, Earth, Moon and the Sun, the solar system and the universe. This laboratory course introduces the fundamentals of astronomy such as: the apparent motion of the sky, Sun, Moon and planets; the nature of light; gravity; the properties of planets; the life cycles of stars; and the structure of the universe. Laboratory and computer exercises will be used, and we will conduct one nighttime lab.

As the learning outcomes, students who succeed in this course may eventually respond to:

How does the process of science work, and how does that process manifest itself in astronomy?
How is astronomy of practical use? How has astronomy impacted our understanding of our world?
What is a planet, and how are planets similar to—and different from—one another?
What is the interior of the Earth like, and how do we know?
What is a star? How are the stars similar to and different from one another?
How did the universe get started? What is likely to happen to the universe in the distant future?
[This project was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship at the Mina Rees Library, The Graduate Center].

Read more about the course design here: https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2020/10/19/inclusive-education-and-research-for-astronomy/

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Yuzhe Song
Date Added:
06/24/2021
Birth of Europe
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This textbook was created for HIST 113: The Birth of Europe. The textbook includes primary source text and assignment prompts.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Andrea Boffa
Christopher Brooks
Julianna Wilson
Date Added:
07/12/2022
Discovering Cultural Anthropology
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Textbook with interactive activities and project assignments for an introduction to cultural anthropology course

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
Social Science
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Antonia M. Santangelo
Date Added:
07/13/2022
Diversity and Multi-Cultural Education in the 21st Century: An OER / COIL / ZTC course text
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this course in addition to culture, we will learn about norms, values, systems of beliefs, social interaction, verbal and non-verbal communication, race and ethnicity, sex, sexual orientation and gender, technology and culture, cultural universalism and relativism, and how these affect our shared or distinct day to day cultural practices and social interaction in our various communities. Students will share their day-to-day social interactions, travels, and cross-cultural experiences in and around New York City. This resource is created for the CLDV 100, Fall 2022 in-class use only. Updates will be provided depending on the semester and course needs via: https://pressbooks.cuny.edu/oalapo

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
Ethnic Studies
Social Science
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Primary Source
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Dr Remi Alapo
Date Added:
07/13/2022
Guyanese Creole
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Guyanese Creole, known to its native speakers as Creolese, was born of the communication between European settlers, African slaves and indigenous peoples of Indian descent in the Dutch colonies of Essequibo and Demerara (Devonish & Thompson 2013). Present day Guyana, Essequibo and Demerara was inhabited by slaves of different African tribes who developed a pidgin in order to communicate with one another. The inter-African pidgin then began to be influenced by the language of the slaves’ Dutch masters, creating an Anglo-West African language variety known as “Dutch-Creole” (Amral Khan 2018). Dutch-Creole became the first language of the newer generations of slaves and began gaining English language influence once English immigrants and plantation owners began to settle in Demerara around 1746. By 1760, the English had become a majority of the European population of Demerara. Due to the Anglo-Dutch wars, the colonies of Essequibo, Demerara and Berbice were acquired by the Dutch, the British and for a brief period in 1781-1784, resulting in some French influence on Dutch Creole as well. At the end of the wars, Great Britain gained control of colonies in 1814 and remined in control until Guyana’s gain of independence in 1966 (Prothero 1920). While Guyana was in the control of the English, the Dutch-Creole transitioned into the present day Creolese of the country. Though Creolese is English-lexified, there are still some Dutch and French words that remain in it. Holbrook (2001) also notes that, due to the Indo-Guyanese population of Guyana, there is also language influence from Hindi, Urdu and Bhojpuri in Creolese. Due to Creolese’s being on a Creole Continuum, the language exists between the standard English of Guyana and its creole. Creolese constantly undergoes change because of this and the multi-cultural population of Guyana.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Matthew Garley
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Jamaican Creole
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Jamaican Creole has a very rich history. According to Farquharson’s article: “Jamaica was a Spanish possession from 1494 right up to 1655.” He later goes on to say that during “1655 an army of 4,000 colonists from Barbados and an additional 1,200 from the Leeward Islands was recruited to capture the Spanish side of the island of Hispaniola.” They failed and decided to try capturing Jamaica. The Spaniards who survived the failed capture, fled to Cuba while African slaves fled into the mountains and formed “Maroons,” (Farquharson). The Atlas of Pidgin and Creole Language Structures states that “during the second half of the seventeenth century, the European population was made up of soldiers, merchants, and colonists from the eastern Caribbean, Ireland, England, and Scotland,” (Farquharson); hence, prior to being imported to Jamaica during Britain’s occupation of the island, the African slaves were somewhat exposed to English-based languages.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Matthew Garley
Date Added:
12/10/2018
The Modern World Since 1815
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This textbook was originally created for an undergraduate survey course taught at all the universities and most of the colleges in the Minnesota State system. As similar courses are taught at institutions around the United States and the world, the authors have made the text available as an open educational resource (OER) that teachers and learners can read, adapt, and reuse to meet their needs.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Mahalia Mehu
Date Added:
09/14/2022
Open Music Theory x CUNY
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CC BY-SA
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Open Music Theory × CUNY is a, free, open-source, online textbook remixed from Open Music Theory. The resources in this edition of Open Music Theory have been designed to support music theory courses at York College, The City University of New York. All text and graphics from this online textbook is made available with a CC BY-SA 4.0 Creative Commons license.Open Music Theory x CUNY is available via GitHub, where you can see the edits and changes made to this remixed version of OMT. This remixed online textbook is supported in part by a OER Fellowship from the Graduate Center, The City University of New York

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
George T. Lam
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Philosophy-A Short History3 – Simple Book Publishing
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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A short introduction to philosophy in a historical perspective, the resource contains short introductions and excerpts from primary readings from western philosophical thinkers ranging from Socrates until today.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Alina Feld
Gabriel Camacho
Date Added:
07/13/2022
Silva_Sibilin AI4ungrading
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This interactive workshop, inspired by Transformative Learning in the Humanities and based on classroom experience, explores the significant value of approaching AI through the lens of ungrading. The workshop focuses on two main strategies. The first--approaching AI through ungrading--consists in learning process letters that include questions about AI. The second--supporting ungrading with AI tools--consists in setting up custom educational bots (e.g. motivational coach, self-grading assistant) to support students with their assignments.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Casandra Silva Sibilin
Date Added:
03/22/2024
Trinidadian Creole
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The republic of Trinidad and Tobago is an island country in the eastern Caribbean. Originally Trinidad was inhibited by the Debo Indians and the Arawak Indians; Nepoya and Suppoya. The island during the 1400s was a Spanish colony with the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1498. In 1797 however the Island changes when Don Jose Maria Chacon had surrendered his rule over the island to the British Empire. During the 1700s the island had undergone various political shifts, and had been ruled by the French, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese and British. In 1802 the island was ceded to Britain due to the Treaty of Amiens. The country over time obtained independence in 1962 and became a republic in 1976. The influx of various different ethnic groups of people began in 1845. After slaves were emancipated, the British authorities looked to start a system of indentured labor. This system looked to contract Indians, Chinese and Portuguese. Between 1845 to 1917 147,000 Indians were brought to work on sugarcane plantations in Trinidad. The mixture of ethnic group would take root within the country and lean to multiracial ethnicities. The island itself Indo- Trinidadians and Afro Trinidadians and Toboggans dominate the demographic at 37.3% and 36.3%. Though there are different cultures and ethnic groups of people there the language spoken in Trinidad varies mostly between the Trinidad and Tobago’s Standard Queen’s English and Trinidadian Creole . Trinidad Creole reflects Asian, African, European and Amerindian language communities within the country.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Matthew Garley
Date Added:
12/10/2018