Search Resources

53 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Film and Music Production
ARTD 3138/7138: Journey to Wakanda: African Art and Popular Culture
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This seminar aims to channel the excitement and interest generated by the film Black Panther into a course that utilizes its themes, design elements, and costumes as a means to explore the art and culture of the African continent. This course will provide students with the tools to assess how African cultures are referenced and reimagined in the film, ultimately allowing them to assess if these allusions are informed and appropriate and how they shape our understanding of the film. The course begins by providing students with several theoretical frameworks for understanding the film and its use of African cultures, followed by an exploration of ancient and historical African empires that served as the inspiration for the mythological empire of Wakanda. The majority of the class focuses on specific characters, examining the actual culture practices and forms of dress that influenced their characterization, providing students with a more nuanced and informed understanding of African cultural practices. Students will examine a diverse range of visual art forms throughout the African continent, with an emphasis on textiles, dress and adornment. Most importantly, this course will encourage students to interrogate and question how African cultures are frequently referenced in American popular culture.

Subject:
Art History
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Chris Richards
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/15/2021
The Anthropology of Sound, Spring 2008
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This class examines the ways humans experience the realm of sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. In addition to learning about how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally, students learn about the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, and sound recording, as well as about the globalized travel of these technologies. Questions of ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the age of digital file sharing are also addressed. A major concern will be with how the sound/noise boundary has been imagined, created, and modeled across diverse sociocultural and scientific contexts. Auditory examples--sound art, environmental recordings, music--will be provided and invited throughout the term.

Subject:
World Cultures
Film and Music Production
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Helmreich, Stefan
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Brooklyn College Documentary Production – FILM 2201
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The Documentary Production class is devoted to the development and production of short 5-10 minute documentaries.

The course promotes the idea of learning production skills through direct practice. Students in the class will be required to demonstrate an understanding of documentary research and development, camera techniques, location sound for documentary, as well as editing both picture and sound.

Students will consider important questions when developing their ideas for a documentary topic.

Course Goals:

Documentary Production will instill in film and television students an understanding and respect for the documentary format and medium.
Documentary Production will encourage students to explore various aesthetic options when shaping a documentary topic.
Students will learn the fundamental technical skills required to thoroughly research and develop a short documentary topic.
Students will learn the fundamentals of camera, sound, and editing considerations necessary for completing a short documentary.
Students will gain an appreciation of the role documentary can play in purposeful forms of filmmaking, with an emphasis on community engagement and community outreach.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Annette Danto
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/17/2021
Brooklyn College Thesis Screenplay – FILM 3300W Thesis Film Screenplay
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

During the months ahead, you will develop a screenplay suitable for production in Film 3300W Thesis Film Production. To help accomplish this, you will be discussing various aspects of screenwriting and filmmaking, doing appropriate reading, screening films, completing exercises meant to develop your ideas and, most importantly, writing a five-to-ten page screenplay.

All assignments must be typed. Spelling and grammar count. Assignments are due at the beginning of each class.

Course Objectives and Goals

To complete a series of writing exercises
To present selected scenes from your screenplay to the class
To write a 5-10 page screenplay in proper format for production in an advanced film production class

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Annette Danto
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/17/2021
Composing for Jazz Orchestra, Fall 2008
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

"This class explores composition and arrangement for the large jazz ensemble from 1920s foundations to current postmodern practice. Consideration given to a variety of styles and to the interaction of improvisation and composition. Study of works by Basie, Ellington, Evans, Gillespie, Golson, Mingus, Morris, Nelson, Williams, and others. Open rehearsals, workshops, and performances of student compositions by the MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble and the Aardvark Jazz Orchestra. ĺĘ"

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harvey, Mark
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Composing with Computers I (Electronic Music Composition), Spring 2008
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

A series of progressive composition projects, culminating in a large final projecting, using various types of music hardware and software. Instruction in recording, editing, synthesis, sampling, digital sound processing, sequencing, and interactive systems. Close listening to computer and electronic music from various genres including Varese, Cage, Schaeffer, Xenakis, Lansky, Stockhausen, Tcherepnin, Barlow, Gunter, and Eno. Subject focuses on using the computer as a means of musical creativity and intuition.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Whincop, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Cultural and Literary Expression in Modernity
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course seeks to develop a nuanced understanding of the scope of cultural and literary expression in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries. It attends to broad socio-historical happenings, from the birth of modernism in the late 19th century to the post-modern moment. In addition to literary modernism, the course will also take a brief look at the cultural production of modernism in art, music, architecture, cinema, philosophy, and drama. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the terms modernism and modernity and explain the similarities and differences between these terms using specific works to illustrate comparison and contrast; List and explain the importance of a variety of social, cultural, and historical developments leading up to and occurring during the modern period; Cite and analyze the meaning of primary works of literature, poetry, art, music, architecture, cinema, philosophy and drama to illustrate the principle characteristics of modernism; Compare and contrast the literatures of both France and England from the start of the modern era (i.e., the turn of the twentieth century); Explain the impact of the Great War upon the development and expression of a variety of literary and artistic forms and especially on poetry in a number of genres; Describe the aftermath of World War I and its variety of effects upon literature and art and especially upon the poetry of T.S. Eliot and the novels of Virginia Woolf and Ernest Hemingway; Define High Modernism and give examples of the tenets, ideals, and even the contradictions and self-contradictions of this movement in history and literature (and especially in both its Irish and British contexts); Define the terms postmodernism and deconstruction as well as the phrase Magical Realism and identify the most important characteristics of the movements, fields, theories, and texts associated with these terms; Explain the premises of postcolonial literature and literary theory and identify, describe, compare, and contrast postcolonial texts from range of national origins. (English Literature 204)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Developing Musical Structures, Fall 2002
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

What are the roles of analysis, description and performance in developing musical perception and understanding? How are units of perception different from units of description? Bamberger's text "Developing Musical Intuitions" and the accompanying software "Impromptu" are used as environments for composing melodies and percussion pieces. These, in turn, serve as the basis for students to interrogate their musical intuitions so as to expand and develop them. Term projects involve learning to perform a new composition or an experiment in musical perception, or designing multiple representations for appropriate analysis of a significant work. The goal of this class is practical: to interrogate, make explicit, and thus to develop the powerful musical intuitions that are at work as you make sense of the music all around you. Reflecting, we will ask how this knowledge develops in ordinary and extraordinary ways.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bamberger, Jeanne Shapiro
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Digital Media (Course Files)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This set of course materials includes lecture slides, activity files, images, quizzes, tests, review questions, and project assignments for Digital Media at Georgia Gwinnett College. The course uses open-source applications such as GIMP and InkScape.

Individual chapters are available for download due to the large file sizes. Web-based assignments to supplement these materials are located on the GGC Wiki: All Digital Media Assignments

Topics covered include:

Digital Images
Image Processing
Audio Processing
Video Processing
Creating Animation

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Kairui Chen
Shuhua Chen
Date Added:
06/20/2018
Documenting Culture, Spring 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

How and why do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Walley, Christine
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Exploring Movie Construction and Production
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Exploring Movie Construction and Production contains eight chapters of the major areas of film construction and production. The discussion covers theme, genre, narrative structure, character portrayal, story, plot, directing style, cinematography, and editing. Important terminology is defined and types of analysis are discussed and demonstrated. An extended example of how a movie description reflects the setting, narrative structure, or directing style is used throughout the book to illustrate building blocks of each theme. This approach to film instruction and analysis has proved beneficial to increasing students’ learning, while enhancing the creativity and critical thinking of the student.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
OpenSUNY Textbooks
Author:
John Reich
Date Added:
07/11/2017
FILM 2701 Film Editing
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

How does the editing of images and sound reveal the complexity of an experience? Through editing we will learn to manipulate time, space, sound and emotions to create a subjective experience we can share with the viewers. In this course you will work to develop skills in the craft of editing. This is a hands-on course, emphasizing non-linear editing using Premiere Pro CC. In addition to the technical aspects of editing, we will study the art and theory of the craft through screenings of a variety of works. We will explore various conventions and expressions in narrative, documentary and experimental forms. Over the course of the semester, you will begin to define your role as an editor, understand editing as a potential profession, and discover how it enriches your overall process as a storyteller.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Sen-I Yu
Date Added:
12/08/2020
FORUMS (Free and Open Resources for Undergraduate Music Study)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

FORUMS is a collection of open online resources supporting post-secondary instruction of music in general studies. FORUMS includes links to authentic, academic and scholarly materials; pedagogical materials. FORUMS seeks to build community among gen ed music teachers. See the FORUMS and community box below for more information. In this prototype pilot version (FORUMS v.1.1), the best way to navigate the site is to use the pull-down tabs from the above menu. FORUMS’ purposes are:

1. to provide an access point to collected, evaluated open access music sites for undergraduate students and faculty;

2. to develop community among those teaching undergraduate general education students; and

3. to support the teaching of music to adult learners, especially students in general studies college courses.

Site users include, but are not limited to: students and teachers of music in general studies classes and adult learners of music worldwide.

Contributors include, but are not limited to: music educators, music performers, musicologists, ethnomusicologists, museum and archive curators and educators, music librarians, SoTL specialists, and others with expertise related to teaching music to adult learners.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Reading
Reference
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Emily Fairey
Jane Palmquist
Date Added:
03/19/2021
Film Aesthetics (Open Course)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This open set of course materials for Film Aesthetics is a downloadable version of a course created for a learning management system. Included are learning modules and a quiz bank based on introductory film concepts including the following topics: Narrative Structure and Motifs, Mise-en-Scene, Cinematography, Sound Design, Music, and Visual Effects.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Elizabeth Lathrop
Thomas Anderson
Date Added:
03/20/2018
Foundations of Theater Practice, Fall 2009
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The goals of this class are two-fold: the first is to experience the creative processes and storytelling behind several of theater's arts and to acquire the analytical skills necessary in assessing the meaning they transmit when they come together in production. Secondly, we will introduce you to these languages in a creative way by giving you hands-on experience in each. To that end, several Visiting Artists and MIT faculty in Theater Arts will guest lecture, lead workshops, and give you practical instruction in their individual art forms.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Sonenberg, Janet
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Fundamentals of Music, Spring 2007
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Introduces students to the basics of musical structure and proficiencies expected of musicians through participation in three integrated hands-on approaches. Lectures introduce students to the basics of music--pitch, rhythm, and its combinations--in a variety of musical settings, including analysis and discussion of students' compositions and of related larger works. Sight-singing lab focuses on developing practical musical skills through oral, aural, and written experiences with rhythms, melodies, intervals, scales, chords, and music notation. Piano lab introduces and continues development of fundamental music skills through keyboard practice.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wood, Pamela
Date Added:
01/01/2007
German Culture, Media, and Society, Fall 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The topic for Fall 2006 is short film and radio plays. This course investigates current trends and topics in German literary, theater, film, television, radio, and other media arts productions. Students analyze media texts in the context of their production, reception, and distribution as well as the public debates initiated by these works. The topic for Fall 2006 is German Short Film, a popular format that represents most recent trends in film production, and German Radio Art, a striving genre that includes experimental radio plays, sound art, and audio installations. Special attention will be given to the representation of German minorities, contrasted by their own artistic expressions reflecting changes in identity and a new political voice. Students have the opportunity to discuss course topics with a writer, filmmaker, and/or media artist from Germany. The course is taught in German.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fendt, Kurt
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Harmony and Counterpoint II, Spring 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

A continuation of Harmony and Counterpoint I, including chromatic harmony and modulation, a more extensive composition project, keyboard laboratory, and sight-singing laboratory.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Robison, Brian
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Harmony and Counterpoint I, Spring 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Basic writing skills in music of the common-practice period (Bach to Brahms). Work includes regular written assignments leading to the composition of short pieces, analyzing representative works from the literature, keyboard laboratory, and sight-singing choir. It is recommended that entering students have some concert music listening or playing background. Enrollment may be limited.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Robison, Brian
Date Added:
01/01/2005
History of Media and Technology: Sound, the Minority Report -- Radical Music of the Past 100 Years, Spring 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course looks at the history of avant-garde and electronic music from the early twentieth century to the present. The class is organized as a theory and production seminar for which students may either produce audio/multimedia projects or a research paper. It engages music scholarship, cultural criticism, studio production, and multi-media development, such as recent software, sound design for film and games, and sound installation. Sound as a media tool for communication and sound as a form of artistic expression are subjects under discussion. The artists' work reviewed in the course includes selections from audio innovators such as the Italian Futurists, Edgard VarĚŹse, John Cage, King Tubby, Brian Eno, Steve Reich, Afrika Bambaataa, Kraftwerk, Merzbow, Aphex Twin, Rza, BjĚŚrk, and others.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Coleman, Beth
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music, Fall 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perry, Ruth
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Introduction to Music
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course provides an introductory survey of the Western classical tradition, exploring music as a phenomenon of both sound and culture. The focus of this course is the development of aural skills that lead to an understanding and appreciation of music; making use of live performances and streaming audio available on the Internet, the student will listen to and explore some of the most important and influential repertoires and genres of music that emerged in the last four centuries. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify aesthetic qualities and compositional processes by studying and listening to significant works of music in both live performances and recorded media; Explain the historical and/or cultural contexts of musical works studied in this course; Demonstrate an aural ability by identifying specific forms, genres, musical techniques, and historical styles of Western classical music; Describe subjective reactions to musical examples and analyze specific expressive qualities that evoke responses; Write about music analytically and effectively, using vocabulary, language and a style appropriate to the discipline and expressing ideas clearly. (Music 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Introduction to Music Composition, Spring 2014
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Through a progressive series of composition projects, students investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Aesthetic issues are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result, whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Makan, Keeril
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Introduction to Western Music, Spring 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Gives students a broad overview of Western music from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century, with emphasis on late Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modernist styles. Enhances the musical experience by developing listening skills and an understanding of diverse forms and genres. Major composers and works placed in social and cultural contexts. Weekly lectures feature demonstrations by professional performers, and introduce topics to be discussed in sections.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harris, Ellen
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Learning the Basics of Filmmaking
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating

The purpose of this course is to learn how to make a short motion picture starting with pre-production. As we walk through all the steps of making this movie, you will prepare yourself for entering film school.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Provider:
Wikiversity
Date Added:
03/06/2019
MUSIC 1300: Music: Its Language, History, and Culture
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Doug Cohen's Music 1300 is a site for students of Music Appreciation, both at Brooklyn College and around the world. We feature open access web resources, and resources available to the CUNY community. We are committed to the use of Open Education Resources (OER). Click on the tabs and dropdown menus to navigate to the lower level pages.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Reference
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
BC Music Department
Douglas Cohen
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/19/2021
Media and Methods: Sound, Fall 2012
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course explores the ways in which humans experience the realm of sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. It examines how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally. It describes the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, sound recording, and the globalized travel of these technologies. Students address questions of ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the age of digital file sharing. There is a particular focus on how the sound/noise boundary is imagined, created and modeled across diverse sociocultural and scientific contexts. Auditory examples will be provided. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication provided. At MIT, this course is limited to 20 students.

Subject:
World Cultures
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
John Picker
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Modern Music: 1900-1960, Fall 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

A survey of major works of the twentieth century, beginning with Mahler, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Bartok, and Ives; continuing with Varese, Webern, Hindemith, Prokofiev, among other composers. A general view of the current scene. Description from course home page:This subject covers a specific branch of music history: Western concert music of first sixty years of the twentieth century. Although we will be listening to and studying many pieces (most of the highest caliber) the goal of the course is not solely to build up a repertory of works in our memory (though that is indeed a goal). We will be most concerned with larger questions of continuity and change in music. We will also consider questions of reception, or historiography - that is, the creation of history and our perception of it. Why do we perceive much of this music, so much closer in time to us than Mozart or Beethoven, to be so foreign? Is this music aloof and separate from popular music of the twentieth century or is there a real connection (perhaps hidden)? The subject will continue to follow some topics of central interest to music before 1960, such as serialism and aleatory, beyond the 1960 cutoff. Conversely a few topics which get their start just before 1960 but which flourish later (minimalism, computer music) will be covered only in 21M.263.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cuthbert, Michael
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Music Since 1960, Spring 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Begins with the premise that the 1960s mark a great dividing point in the history of twentieth-century Western musical culture, and explores the ways in which various social and artistic concerns of composers, performers, and listeners have evolved since that decade. Focuses on works by classical composers from around the world. Topics to be explored include: the impact of rock, as it developed during the 1960s-70s; the concurrent emergence of post-serial, neo-tonal, Minimalist, and New Age styles; the globalization of Western musical traditions; the impact of new technologies; and the significance of music video, video games, and other versions of (digital) multimedia. Interweaves discussion of these topics with close study of seminal musical works, evenly distributed across the four decades since 1960. Works by MIT composers included.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Robison, Brian
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Musical Analysis, Spring 2008
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

An introduction to the analysis of tonal music. Students develop analytical techniques based upon concepts learned in Harmony and Counterpoint I and II. Students study harmony, counterpoint, melodic line and motivic relationships at local and large scale levels of musical structure. Three 7-page papers, one revised paper, and one oral presentation required.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Child, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Music and Technology (Contemporary History and Aesthetics), Fall 2009
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

"This course is an investigation into the history and aesthetics of music and technology as deployed in experimental and popular musics from the 19th century to the present. Through original research, creative hands-on projects, readings, and lectures, the following topics will be explored. The history of radio, audio recording, and the recording studio, as well as the development of musique concr?te and early electronic instruments. The creation and extension of musical interfaces by composers such as Harry Partch, John Cage, Conlon Nancarrow, and others. The exploration of electromagnetic technologies in pickups, and the development of dub, hip-hop, and turntablism. The history and application of the analog synthesizer, from the Moog modular to the Roland TR-808. The history of computer music, including music synthesis and representation languages. Contemporary practices in circuit bending, live electronics, and electro-acoustic music, as well as issues in copyright and intellectual property, will also be examined. No prerequisites."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ariza, Christopher
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Music in Global America
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

During this semester we will:
1) Trace the diaspora of folk and popular music traditions to the U.S. from various parts of the world.
2) Analyze the survival, transformation, and hybridization of those musical practices and their impact on American popular music.
3) Explore how and why American music is globalized; the role of the Internet and mass media in this process; and the ways in which local cultures around the world adapt American music to their own society and traditions.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Marc Thorman
Date Added:
12/26/2020
PIMA 7020G /FILM7032G : ARTISTIC PROCESS IN CONTEMPORARY COMMUNITY/SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM HISTORY
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Bringing together MA and MFA students from Brooklyn College and CUNY in PIMA, Screen Studies, Film, Art History, Queer and Feminist Studies, and related disciplines, this team-taught course engages closely with twelve AIDS activist videotapes from the first decade of the crisis to raise and respond to questions about videotape, analogue records, the archive, research, performance, and AIDS. The Spring 2020 class will sit and be built out here, in this growing Scalar "book," taking and growing the form of a student-generated, online, openly-available resource for more teaching, learning, and activism about the 12 tapes under consideration. In Spring 2019, the course was built in and using Omeka, and some of what remains is available there. An article about the first iteration of the experimental class by Professors Juhasz and McCoy is available on this site here (in Readings). In Spring 2020, students will build from the research, performance, art, and activism of the previous cohort, whose work focused on three current and past concerns raised by the selected tapes: prostitutes’ and sex workers rights and AIDS; art, voice, education, authenticity, and children in relation to AIDS and queerness; and community-based activism for and about communities of color, with a particular interest in the Brooklyn-based activist group, VOCAL, and their commitments to housing and safe consumption spaces for people affected by AIDS (see Student Projects).

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Alexandra Juhasz
Emily Fairey
Jennifer McCoy
Date Added:
03/19/2021
PIMA 7742G Dynamic and Interactive Media in Performance II
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In-depth study of tools and techniques for designing dynamic and interactive multimedia systems for use in live performance situations. Emphasis will be on student creation of custom computer software to realize interactive projects. Video, audio, three-dimensional computer images, and alternative computer-human interfaces will be addressed. Extensive instruction in graphical computer programming; no experience required.

Subject:
Computer Science
Computing and Information
Technology
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Briggan Krauss
Ryan Holsopple
Date Added:
03/08/2021
Producing Educational Videos
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Production of Educational Videos is an introduction to technical communication that is situated in the production of educational videos; the assignments are all focused on the production of videos that teach some aspect of MIT's first-year core curriculum. The objective of these assignments is improvement in both communication ability and communication habits; these improvements are effected by providing participants with instruction, practice, feedback, and the opportunity for reflection. In addition to improvements in communication skills, improvement is expected in students' attitude towards writing, oral presentations, and collaboration; as the semester progresses, students should feel confident of their ability to write, present, and collaborate.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
David Custer
Graham Gordon Ramsay
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Sample Assignment: Science Fiction Social Justice Story
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

This assignment is inspired by the learnings that arose from the workshop, “Fostering Play in the Classroom - Pedagogies to Build Creativity, Connection and Light to Oppressive Spaces”. Based on group dialogue, feedback, and the desire to build on pedagogies of play in the workshop, this science fiction short story assignment has been created as an additional layer of liberatory, contemplative learning for students that can be used/tweaked to work in a variety of courses. Powerful conversations arose in the workshop surrounding power/oppression, positionality and how this impacts our ability to engage in play, and the importance of holding both/and (i.e. - joy/sadness, pain/pleasure, restriction/liberation). This assignment attempts to deepen these reflections through creativity, storytelling, and removal of limits for dreaming in a world with obstacles. 

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Information Science
Technology
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Graphic Arts
Languages
Literature
Performing Arts
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Business and Communication
Communication
Journalism
Public Relations
Career and Technical Education
Film and Music Production
Graphic Design
Education
Higher Education
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
History
Law
Life Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Ethnic Studies
Linguistics
Political Science
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lesson
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Christina Katopodis
Date Added:
04/27/2021
Schubert to Debussy, Fall 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

A survey of developments in Western musical style from 1810-1910. Thirty composers discussed including the Romantics Schubert, Berlioz, Chopin, Schumann, and Liszt; and the post-Romantics Wagner, Verdi, Brahms, Strauss, Farwell, and Mahler. Required reading, score-reading, and listening assignments.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Shadle, Charles
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Seminar on Deep Engagement, Fall 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Innovation in expression -- as realized in media, tangible objects, and performance, and more -- generates new questions and new potentials for human engagement. When and how does expression engage us deeply? While "deep engagement" seems fundamental to the human psyche, it is hard to define, difficult to reliably design for, and hard to critically measure or assess. Are there principles we can articulate? Are there evaluation metrics we can use to insure quality of experience? Many personal stories confirm the hypothesis that once we experience deep engagement, it is a state we long for, remember, and want to repeat. We need to better understand these principles and innovate methods that can insure higher-quality products (artifacts, experiences, environments, performances, etc.) that appeal to a broad audience and that have lasting value over the long term.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Film and Music Production
Anatomy/Physiology
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Breazeal, Cynthia
Davenport, Glorianna
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Sound for Multimedia
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Introduction to the use of sound in multimedia, including post-production
and editing, with an emphasis on integration with visual components.
Students develop techniques of organizing and manipulating sound with
industry standard software and hardware systems. Digital audio formats,
compression protocols, streaming audio,synchronization, and integration
with multimedia elements are covered. MIDI and basic sequencing are
introduced as used in internet playback systems. Importing and exporting
audio protocols between a variety of applications is covered. Students
will work in an intensive, project-oriented environment, using a variety
of applications . The final project adds sound to a visual media scene.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Electronic Technology
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Crystal Kim
Date Added:
10/18/2019