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Introduction to Discrete Structures – Brooklyn College – CISC2210
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Course Topics: Elementary set theory, functions, relations, and Boolean algebra. Switching circuits, gating networks. Definition and analysis of algorithms. Applications of graph theory to computer science. Related algorithms. Introduction to combinatorial computing and counting arguments. Introduction to error analysis.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Yunhua Zhao
Date Added:
07/21/2022
Introduction to Sociology
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This course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. What is sociology? Why is it important? Over the course of the semester students will develop what C. W Mills called a “sociological imagination” that will allow them to see how individuals are shaped by social structures and institutions, and in turn how we as individuals recreate those institutions. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches, becoming aware of how sociologists make sense of this complex social world.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Maya Tellman
Date Added:
07/21/2022
Português para principiantes | Portuguese for Beginners
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The first in a three-semester introductory sequence for beginners. Emphasis on basic social functions, simple conversation, readings, and writing. Introduction to the cultures where Portuguese is spoken.

By the end of this course students will be able to:

Talk about home duties and and leisure from their everyday life.
Distinguish and conjugate verbs estar and
Conjugate verbs in present tense.
Talk about actions that occur in near future.
Describe objects and actions from their university.
Describe and talk about their families.
Get in touch with contemporary music, films and literature from different Portuguese speaking countries.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Luis E Escamilla Frias
Date Added:
07/18/2022
Fundamentals of Psychotherapy – PSYC 3820 TR5
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This course will provide an introduction to the most important theoretical systems of psychotherapy and their technical applications for the treatment of individuals with a variety of psychological problems (calling for modification of behaviors, cognitions, and/or emotions).

By the end of this class, students will be to:

Name 3 schools of thought in psychotherapy
Identify internal obstacles to psychotherapy from the therapist’s and patient’s sides
Cite the 3 important changes or movements in the history of psychotherapy
Cite the main elements of the methods in individual, couple, and family therapy
Utilize the appropriate vocabulary linked with the field of psychotherapy.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Katia Henrys
Date Added:
07/18/2022
Anthropology - Culture and Society
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In this course, we will focus on a survey of topics that will help us hone the discussion on cultural production, manifestations, and contestations. The course will provide an interdisciplinary perspective grounded in Anthropology, but also including materials from other fields in the social sciences, such as History, and Cultural Studies. The course will also introduce students to the four-field approach in Anthropology (Cultural Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, and Linguistics). The geographical regions that will be covered in this class will be Latin America and the Caribbean (including its diasporas) and the United States of America. This will provide students with a context to discuss topics that include culture, race and ethnicity, connecting it to the main arguments around cultural difference, identity, political economy, health, food, environment, language, politics, gender, sports, and religion.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Joseph A. Torres-González
Date Added:
07/18/2022
Introduction to Theatre Arts
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This course will introduce you to the various elements of the theatre with particular attention to the following inquiries: What is theatre? How is it created? What are the various occupations in the theatre? What is the position of theatre in society? How are theatre and history interconnected? My goal for this course is to give you the means to discuss theatrical experiences (either as theatre makers or spectators) as well as a great variety of theatrical traditions and provide a basis for your future endeavors with this art form. This will be based on lectures, readings, in-class discussions, and seeing theatrical productions.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Jacquelyn Marie Shannon
Date Added:
07/18/2022
HIST 1101: The Shaping of the Modern World: A History of Race, Capitalism, Nation, and Empire Since 1500
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What do we mean by “modernity” or the “modern world”? In this course, we will define modernity by examining global changes in politics, economy, culture, and society since 1500. We will approach these changes with a particular focus on the themes of capitalist development, imperialism, race, gender, and class. In doing so, we will engage with and challenge Eurocentric notions of modernity, and consider alternative ways of understanding global history.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Evan Rothman
Date Added:
07/18/2022
CISC 3310 Principles of Computer Architecture
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Introduction to digital logic. Basic digital circuits. Boolean algebra and combinational logic, data
representation and transfer, digital arithmetic. Instruction sets. Introduction to assembly
languages: ALU and memory reference instructions, flow control. Memory. I/O systems.
Performance. After successful completion of this course, students will have a thorough
understanding of the structure and behavior of computer systems and the logical and abstract
aspects of system implementation as seen by the programmer.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Vivek Sharma
Date Added:
07/18/2022
Speculative Fiction and "Society"
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In this class the topic is speculative fiction, an area of English Literature that includes Science Fiction and Fantasy, among other genres. Over the course of this class we will think about different reasons why people might read or write speculative fiction, culminating in an independent research paper where you will come up with your own question to investigate. The first half of the class will focus on exploring speculative genres and building a framework for literary analysis. We will continue this work into the second half of the class with an added focus on how to conduct research, formalize research questions and arguments, and write a longer academic paper.

Subject:
Literature
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Natasha Ochshorn
Date Added:
07/18/2022
PSYC 2530 Introductory Cognitive Psychology
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An introductory overview of basic concepts in cognitive psychology such as memory, attention, perception, problem solving, decision-making, language and imagery. Experimental findings and proposed models will be discussed for each topic.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Module
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Matthew Crump
Date Added:
03/25/2022
ENGL 3301/3302: Creative Writing Workshop
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In this fiction-writing course, we will explore different styles of writing and develop our own voices through writing exercises, reading assignments, class discussions, and workshops. Individual meetings will also be incorporated.

Potential topics for discussion include: flash fiction, world-building, twists, point of view, voice, dialogue, suspense, tension, mystery, mood, contrast, narrative structure, imagery, metaphor, experimentation, genre-bending, creativity, writing practices, revision, publishing, literary magazine submissions, the writer’s life, and anything else that may arise. The fourth online hour will consist of weekly Blackboard blog posts in which we will discuss the readings and themes of the course in greater depth.

Throughout the semester, you will expand your voice and practice your craft. The emphasis is on process more than product. You will be encouraged to step out of your comfort zone and take on new challenges.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Helen Phillips
Date Added:
03/07/2022
ARTD 3015: The Development of the Silk Road
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An exploration of the art and architecture of the Silk Road across Afro-Eurasia, from the Han Dynasty (2nd century BCE) until the spread of colonialism (17th century). Some discussion of the contemporary Silk Road will also be included. Subjects covered: the history of art, the rise and interaction of Islam and Buddhism, and the economic and diplomatic context that facilitated the development and expansion of the Silk Road, the Silk Road today.

Subject:
Art History
Ancient History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Anna Carroll
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/07/2022
PHYS 3300: Electrical Circuit Analysis
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4 hours; 4 credits Passive and active circuit elements; Voltage, current, and power. Kirchhoff's laws; mesh and nodal analysis; Circuit analysis techniques: Linearity and Superposition; Source transformations; Thevenin's and Norton's theorems; The Operational Amplifier; Capacitors and inductors; Source-free and forced RL, RC, and RLC circuits; Sinusoidal steady state analysis; AC circuit power analysis; Complex frequency and the Laplace transform. (Not open to students who are enrolled in or have completed Physics 13 or 13.1 or 4200 [61.5].) Prerequisite: Physics *2150 [2.5]. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Mathematics 2206 [13]. Although only 4 credits are awarded formally in this course, there are in fact 35 Lectures of 100 minutes each, equivalent to time spent on a 6 credit course.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Lecture
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Viraht Sahni
Date Added:
03/07/2022
PRLS 4410: Bilingualism in the 21st Century
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About Puerto Rican Latino Studies 4410 W5: Bilingualism in the 21st Century
This course is geared to increase the knowledge and awareness of prospective teachers about concepts and programs of bilingualism in the U.S. We will explore the history of bilingual education in the United States, policies, theories and practices. In addition, we will explore viewpoints on literacy for bilinguals or emergent bilinguals. We will also explore bilingual programs and the controversies and ideologies about bilingualism in the U.S. and the rest of the world.

Subject:
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Janette Torres-Arroryo
Date Added:
02/22/2022
PRLS 3203: Latin@ Diasporas in the United States
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The purpose of this course is to understand the socio-historical, political and economic influences on Latinos and Latin Americans by exploring the myriad ways in which colonialism and globalization promote the development of Latino diasporic communities in the United States. In order to understand the dynamic constructs of “Latina/o/x” identity and experience within the diasporas, the course will pay close attention to immigration and migration and its timing, the shifting dynamics of institutional inequality, prejudice, discrimination and racism over time. The course will compare not only Latin American societies to those of the U.S., but also differences among Latino groups in different regions of the United States.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Janette Torres-Arroryo
Date Added:
02/22/2022
ENGL 2121: World Literature II
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This is second of two courses designed to familiarize you with world literature (The first is ENGL 2120). This reading and writing intensive course covers the major literary movements during the years 1800 - 1950, including Romanticism, Realism-Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. We will consider these movements in the context of precipitating and concurrent historical events: the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, fin de siècle decadence and the two world wars. We will also touch on critical theory, but the main aim of this course is to engage with works of literature personally, rather than through the lens of critics’ theories about them.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Bonnie Harris
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
02/22/2022
ENGL 7420: The Short Story
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This course focuses on the genre of the short story in comparative literature of the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries. Stories are drawn from English, North and South American, Anglophone, European, and Asian traditions. Stories range from very short to long ones, stories that stand alone to ones that are linked in collections, and classics to contemporary pieces Since the short story is a form essentially without rules, attention will be paid to the ways that a great variety of stories take shape and help to define the genre. Typically each week’s reading assignment will be four to six stories. All readings are accessible on the course website:

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Wendy Fairey
Date Added:
02/22/2022
ENGL 7506: Practicum in Teaching College-Level Composition
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Introduces scholarship in the field of composition studies to enable students to use knowledge of developments in composition as they prepare to teach. Students become familiar with scholarly journals and read articles about major theoretical concepts and a variety of topics. Students also become familiar with textbooks and material available for teaching composition as well as draft a sample syllabus for a composition course. Each class meeting will include discussion of assigned reading and practical applications. Most students will be assigned a mentor (more experienced instructor) and observe the mentor’s composition course once a week. In general, the tutor-intern/mentor pair will be assigned by the first day of classes. Requirements will be explained.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Elaine Brooks
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
02/22/2022
ARTD 1035: The Development of the Silk Road – CUNY Brooklyn College
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This site was developed as an open educational resource (OER) for the CUNY / Brooklyn College course, ARTD 3105 The Development of the Silk Road, taught by Professors Jennifer L. Ball and Shuming Lu.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Jennifer L. Ball
Shuming Lu
Date Added:
02/22/2022
SOCY 2112: Research Methods 2 – Prof. Emily Tumpson Molina
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The second course in research methods for Sociology Majors. Quantitative research methods course for sociology concentrations in the urban sustainability program.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Emily Tumpson Molina
Date Added:
02/19/2022
Philosophy 2101: Introduction to Philosophy
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Philosophy is part of a rational attempt to understand the world. In this class, you will be attacking some of the major questions throughout the past 2,500 years of Western philosophy in order to understand both the history of Western thought— important in its own right—as well as how to think honestly about things, how to be rational agents, and how to consider evidence and reject bad arguments. Those fundamental questions are, "What do we know?", "What is reality like?", and "What makes our actions good or bad?"

In addition, this course is designed to introduce some of issues relating to the philosophical areas of metaphysics (theories of reality), epistemology (theories of knowledge), and ethics (theories of value). We will read several historical and contemporary philosophical writings and will try to answer the following questions: Does God exist? What is the nature of human existence? Do we have free will? Is it possible for computers to think? What is the relation between the mind and the body? What are the criteria of knowledge? What is the basis of moral judgments?

Through critically analyzing various arguments regarding those topics, this course will help you improve your ability to read, write and think critically. You will be able to examine the given arguments’ strengths and weaknesses by identifying and evaluating the main argument, constructing objections, and finding possible responses to those objections; you will be highly encouraged and advised to develop your philosophical ideas.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Bharat Edupghanti
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
02/19/2022
ARTD 3014/ARTD 7015G: Across Byzantium: Arts and Architectures of Empire
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Course Description: In 324CE, Constantine the Great moved the capital of the Roman Empire to Constantinople, creating what scholars now refer to as the Byzantine Empire. From 324 to 1453, the Byzantine Empire existed as a major power in the Mediterranean World. Its artists negotiated its Roman past with its Christian present, innovating new modes of depicting the world in art and architecture. In this class we will examine works from the early through late Byzantine periods, questioning Byzantine identity in the arts. Drawing from a wide geographic range, we will consider the Byzantine Empire as a site of cross-cultural interaction and exchange, and ask how art objects expressed the diversity and power of the Empire.

Subject:
Art History
Ancient History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Date Added:
02/19/2022
ARTD 2812: BC Multimedia-Summer 2020
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This session will be a studio based model in which students will complete 2D animation projects using multimedia elements such as images, sound, music, and text. These images can be drawings, photographs, or three dimensional materials. The course will help students develop a facility with tools and will steer them towards a personal animation style. Class time will be used to show works in progress, ask questions, get and give feedback, view historical examples, and work on animations in class. There will be opportunities for both individual and collaborative projects. Pre-production techniques like storyboarding and animatics will be covered. Both low and high-tech animation will be examined including cell animation, stop-motion, and motion graphics.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Jennifer McCoy
Date Added:
02/19/2022
ARTD 2812: BC Multimedia-Summer
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About BC Multimedia
This session will be a studio based model in which students will complete 2D animation projects using multimedia elements such as images, sound, music, and text. These images can be drawings, photographs, or three dimensional materials. The course will help students develop a facility with tools and will steer them towards a personal animation style. Class time will be used to show works in progress, ask questions, get and give feedback, view historical examples, and work on animations in class. There will be opportunities for both individual and collaborative projects. Pre-production techniques like storyboarding and animatics will be covered. Both low and high-tech animation will be examined including cell animation, stop-motion, and motion graphics.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Jennifer McCoy
Date Added:
02/19/2022
Textbook – Archaeology 1400
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Entire textbook by Colin Renfrew and Paul Bahn is available for download here, but as this will take a long time to load, you may prefer to go chapter by chapter. Website in which this textbook resides was used for Fall 2021.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Anthropology
Archaeology
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Kelly Britt
Date Added:
02/18/2022
Introduction to Clinical Audiology (CASD 2481)
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This course will explore the profession of Audiology with a focus on diagnostic testing and aural rehabilitation options for patients. We will discuss hearing disorders and pathologies; how to measure and assess hearing using pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and objective measures of hearing; and you will learn how to interpret an audiogram.

Subject:
Communication
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Jade Igbokwe
Date Added:
01/10/2022
Introduction to Puerto Rican and Latin@ Studies
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Survey and theoretical foundations in Puerto Rican and Latin@ Studies. Case study on Puerto Rico. Pertinent themes in Puerto Rican and Latin@ history, culture, literature, contemporary society, and politics. Impact of the United States? economic policies on Puerto Rico and the causes of Puerto Rican and LatinX migration to New York City and urban centers. Satisfies Pathways Flexible Core US Experience in Its Diversity requirement.

Subject:
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Laura Pavón Aramburú
Date Added:
01/10/2022
PHIL 3121: Modern Philosophy
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From the 16th until the early 18th centuries, as Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Bernoulli, and Newton revolutionized science, Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, and Hume, among others, shaped the modern philosophical worldview.

What were their conceptions of the nature of reality? How could we attain knowledge of it? How should natural philosophy or science be practiced? What was the relationship between knowledge, opinion, and faith? What did the human freedom of will mean?

We will study these questions in order to understand how modern philosophy arose. This will help us understand what it means to be philosophically “modern.”

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Daniel Campos
Date Added:
01/10/2022
TV, RADIO AND EMERGING MEDIA WRITING (TREM 2616)
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This course focuses on the skills needed to write for radio and television. We will be working with news, documentary, comedy/drama, and advertising.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
George Rodman
Date Added:
01/10/2022
TVRA 7713 Media and Communication History and Regulation
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In-depth industrial and cultural historical overview of the development of electronic mass communication. Historical and legal approaches and methods.

Subject:
Communication
Film and Music Production
History, Law, Politics
Law
Material Type:
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Wiebke Reile
Date Added:
12/14/2021
SOCY 3303/ WGST 3122 Sociology of the Welfare State and Current Issues
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The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the sociological field of the Welfare State. We will review a number of important contributions and debates in the topic with the goal of providing students with the tools to critically analyze social policy and learn theoretical frameworks that explain the emergence and development of different welfare regimes.

American welfare policies are particularly meager in comparison to any other industrialized country. We will review theoretical and historical explanations for the present state of U.S. welfare, zooming in on the neoliberal rollback since the late 1970s. We will allot special time to discuss current issues in welfare policy and bold policy proposals that are gaining traction among the population, such as Medicare for All and the Green New Deal.

The welfare state can be thought of as a set of a set of social policies that transform the relationship among three actors: individuals, their families and the state. In this sense, social policies have a strong impact on family relations and gender oppression. We will review some of the most important discussions around welfare and women’s liberation.

Subject:
Sociology
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Bibliography
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Juan Ferre
Date Added:
12/14/2021
SPCL 7922T Multicultural Counseling
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This course equips students with the clinical skills necessary for pupil personnel service providers to work effectively with multilingual and culturally diverse populations. This experience-based course will develop an awareness of cultural, linguistic, and ethnic factors that influence and shape behavior and development. Personal history, literature, and films will be analyzed in the contexts of acculturation and identity. Current research and theoretical and applied knowledge in this field will be reviewed. Students will integrate theoretical and applied knowledge in written assignments and presentations.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Psychology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Sarah Baquet
Date Added:
12/14/2021
PSYC 1000 Introductory Psychology (Shane)
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An introduction to the major facts, principles, methods, and theories of psychology. Topics include the history of psychology, sensory and perceptual processes, learning and cognition, motivation and emotion, psychological development, clinical and abnormal psychology, and biological, social, and personality determinants of behavior.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Jacob Shane
Date Added:
12/14/2021
CISC 3320 Operating Systems
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After successful completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the features and functionality of operating systems that enable both end users and trained computer programming professionals to leverage the almost unlimited computing and storage capabilities of modern computers.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Harry Goldberg
Date Added:
11/17/2021
Calculus for Everyone
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Browse the pages of this site to view information on the math department textbook, individual websites hosted by several professors who teach Calculus, one of which contains a free textbook, and links to videos and other useful resources.

This site is part of an Open Educational Resources pilot program, and was completed in collaboration with Professor Miriam Deutch and her team at the Brooklyn College Library and Professors Sandra Kingan, Jeffrey Suzuki, and John Velling.

Subject:
Calculus
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Jeff Suzuki
John Velling
Kingan
Miriam Deutch
Sandra
Date Added:
11/15/2021
BIOL 4010W: Macromolecular Structure and Bioinformatics
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The fundamentals of biological macromolecular structures; an introduction to the computational tools important in determining biological functions. (This course is the same as Computer and Information Science 2810W.) Writing-intensive course.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Shaneen
Singh
Date Added:
11/15/2021
Latinxs in the Criminal Justice Complex – An OER Course for Prof. Rita Sandoval
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LatinXs within the penal system; mass incarceration and reform; racial profiling; juvenile justice; drug criminalization; legal representation; immigration policy; human and civil rights struggles and organized movements; political activism and repression, including Puerto Rican nationalists;”gang” formation; globalization and labor formation after 1970’s shift in global capital; school-to prison pipeline; urban displacement.

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Rita Sandoval
Date Added:
11/11/2021
PRLS3340: Critical Methods in Puerto-Rican and Latinx Studies
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Official Course Description
"Examine critical research issues in Puerto Rican and Latinx studies. Introduce students to a
variety of ways of thinking about “knowledge" and to specific ways of knowing and making
arguments in Puerto Rican and Latinx studies using key humanistic, social science, and
"interdisciplinary methodologies."
Course Overview
How do we study U.S. Latino and Caribbean populations and cultures? Some read literature,
watch a film, read a history book… and others conduct interviews, do field work to identify and
describe social and cultural practices, or collect oral histories and traditions. Are you interested
in learning how to use different sources and methods to learn more about ethnic communities
in the United States? What is the contribution of ethnic studies to our knowledge about migrant
and underrepresented populations and their cultural manifestations? This class is a basic
introduction to cultural and social science research methods with a focus on Caribbean and Latino
Studies.
Furthermore, the course will introduce you to the research process, including how researchers
select topics, formulate research questions, design research, and analyze and interpret data. It
will explore differences in how these issues present themselves and are addressed in designs that
are quantitative, qualitative or both.
A Brief Note on the terms Latino/Latinx/Latine:
A majority of this course covers the diversity and heterogeneity that fall under the singular
designation of “Latino”. Many course readings (given their time period and purpose) may use the
term “Hispanic”, “Latino”, or “Latinx”. In the last few years, “Latinx” has been used to identify
one’s indigenous roots, and more recently, to describe works that critically engage with
questioning and challenging heteronormative functions that suppress diasporic Latin American
and Hispanic-Caribbean people in the United States. During our class discussions, Latinx/Latine
can be used at the discretion of students to demonstrate course material’s inclusivity of LGBTQ
experiences.

Subject:
World Cultures
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Rita Sandoval
Date Added:
11/11/2021
PRLS 1001: Introduction to Puerto Rican and LatinX Studies
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Official Course Description

“Survey and theoretical foundations in Puerto Rican and Latino Studies. Case study on Puerto Rico. Pertinent themes in Puerto Rican and Latino history, culture, literature, contemporary society, and politics. Impact of the United States’ economic policies on Puerto Rico and the causes of Puerto Rican and Latin@ migration to New York City and urban centers.”

Course Overview

This course aims to familiarize students with Puerto Rican and Latin@ Studies by providing an interdisciplinary survey of the fields theoretical foundations. The course overviews the important historical, political and economic context that has created and influenced the Puerto Rican and Latin@ diaspora in the United States. It explores central themes within the discipline, including immigration, identity, gender and sexuality, culture and literature. The course analyzes the influence of Puerto Rican and Latino communities on urban centers, popular culture and politics.

A Brief Note on the terms Latino/Latinx/Latine:

A majority of this course covers the diversity and heterogeneity that fall under the singular designation of “Latino”. Many course readings (given their time period and purpose) may use the term “Hispanic”, “Latino”, or “Latinx”. In the last few years, “Latinx” has been used to identify one’s indigenous roots, and more recently, to describe works that critically engage with questioning and challenging heteronormative functions that suppress diasporic Latin American and Hispanic- Caribbean people in the United States. During our class discussions, “Latinx” can be used at the discretion of students to demonstrate course material’s inclusivity of LGBTQ experiences.

Course Learning Goals

– Develop an understanding of the interdisciplinary theoretical foundations of Puerto Rican and Latinx studies.
– Develop an understanding of the factors that contributed to the rise of Latinx activism within the US, and how these movements have impacted political participation and the treatment of Latinx’s in the US.
– Recognize and understand the historical economic, political and social context from which Puerto Rican and Latinx immigration and diaspora has emerged.
– Articulate an understanding of how the intersection of gender, race, ethnicity, class, immigration status, and nationality relate to the diversity of Latinx experiences in the US.
– Utilize their understanding of the history background of different groups within the Latinx community to analyze their current social and economic well-being, as well as their political participation.
– Be capable of critically analyzing and discussing current issues within the Puerto Rican and Latinx communities related to the current political, social and economic order in the US, as well as how the Latinx experience related to other minority groups within the US

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Commons Admin
Emily Fairey
Rita Sandoval
Date Added:
11/11/2021
HIST 3320: The History of Childhood (Banerjee) (Fall 2021)
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Childhood forms the core of human experience. Childhood is “a unique key to the larger human experience, from historical past to global present” (Stearns, Childhood in World History, 14). Yet, history continues to remain concerned with the big actors such as kings, queens, rulers, statesmen, revolutionaries, and leaders while children and childhood are naturalized and often fall through the cracks. Instead of assuming childhood as natural, this course brings to the fore childhood and children as important subjects of historical investigation. It will explore childhood as a dynamic and a historically constructed category that evolved differently in different contexts and changed over time. The meanings, experiences, and expectations of childhood varied according to class-caste, race, gender, religion, and other variables in different environments and time periods. Adopting a transnational and comparative approach, this course will engage in a reading of primary and secondary sources, use videos and films to investigate the role of children and childhood in different countries and cultures from antiquity to the present.

Subject:
Early Childhood Development
U.S. History
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Swapna Banerjee
Date Added:
11/01/2021
CASD 1643 Visual Communication (Levy) (Fall 2021)
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Visual communication pervades our lives. We live in a visual culture, surrounded by visual messages that affect us consciously and unconsciously. Much of our media and electronic communications are visually-oriented. But the truth is that as humans, we have always lived that way, and we are, in fact, programmed to take in the world through our visual perceptions. This class will grapple with the question of what it means to be so dependent on visual input and output and how that affects all aspects of our lives as one of our dominant communicative tools. And you may even learn how you can take advantage of this tool – and lessen it’s negative impact. Historical, physiological, perceptual and cognitive aspects of visual communication. Broad and diverse approaches to visual perception, reception and persuasion including theoretical perspectives, critical analysis methods, and ethical implications.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Communication
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Sharona Levy
Date Added:
11/01/2021
WGST 4410W Women’s and Gender Studies Research Seminar (Banerjee)
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This advanced seminar for seniors majoring in WGST (Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) is designed to guide and facilitate a research paper related to women, gender, and sexuality studies.

Subject:
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Swapna Banerjee
Date Added:
11/01/2021
CASD 1114 Survey of Speech, Language, & Hearing Disorders (Hurd)
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This course is an overview of speech, language, and hearing disorders. It will investigate the impact of communication on children with developmental disabilities and enable non-specialists to work effectively with this population. Throughout this course, we will consider a range of problems (i.e., neurological and physiological disabilities), as well as applications to children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Subject:
Languages
Early Childhood Development
Speaking and Listening
Linguistics
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Julie Hurd
Date Added:
10/06/2021
CASD 1114 Survey of Speech, Language & Hearing Disorders (Hanini)
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This course focuses on survey of speech, language, and communication disorders for educators. It includes the consideration of varied disorders that might be encountered in educational settings; application to children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Subject:
Languages
Early Childhood Development
Speaking and Listening
Linguistics
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Rawan Hanini
Date Added:
10/06/2021
SOCY 1101 Introduction to Sociology (González)
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This is an introductory class to sociology. We will cover some of the most important fields and topics in sociology such as Education, Class, Inequality, Race, Immigration, Gender, Work, Occupations, Technology, the New Economy, Poverty, Political Sociology, the Welfare State, Qualitative Sociology, and Environmental Sociology. We will read some of the most important studies in this field with the aim of understanding how sociological research is produced and knowing some of the main debates in the field.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Marcela F. González
Date Added:
10/06/2021
ENGL 2120: World Literature I
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This is the first of two courses designed to familiarize you with world literature. (The second is ENGL 2121) This reading and writing intensive course covers the major literary works from 1200-1800.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Bonnie Harris
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
09/20/2021
ANTH 3135: Home The American Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives
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This course engages students in the diversity of American urban life and introduces various modes of analyzing socio-cultural scenes, communities, and urban institutions. In the first part of the course, we will lay the foundations for understanding urban processes and communities. We will examine the racial and ethnic diversity in cities and the ways people understand and cope with being in an environment filled with "strangers". We will develop an understanding of urban political economy and the effects of inequality and economic strain on urban life. In the second part of the course, we will focus on the effects of globalization, post-industrial decline, and post-modernism on cities. In this section, we will focus on the production and consumption of urban spaces. We will look at the ways American cities have developed and changed as well as the competing views and political contestations behind these transformations.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Reference
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Christa Paterline
Date Added:
09/03/2021
SPCL 7931T Practicum in School Psychology
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Supervised field experience in the role and functions of the school psychologist with culturally diverse students, groups, colleagues. This course is a supervisory seminar for the practicum experience. Issues relevant to practicum activities will be discussed. The focus of this course is on the practicum experience, with special attention paid to an understanding of individual and group counseling, assessment, consultation, and the importance of the family.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Daniela Bejarano
Makel Lynch
Paul McCabe
Date Added:
08/23/2021
SPCL 7912X: Social and Adaptive Behavior Assessment
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Course involves the administration, scoring, and interpretation of personality, social and behavioral assessments given to individuals and groups. Representative projective techniques and objective behavioral assessments will be presented, critiqued, and administered. Research findings pertaining to the most commonly used personality procedures and their utility in the schools will be explored. Students will write assessment results into psychological reports.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Carolina Julian
Paul McCabe
Date Added:
08/23/2021
MATH 1231 Applied Calculus for Economics, Business and Finance
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An applied calculus course aimed primarily at economics, business and finance students. Detailed study of functions and their properties (linear, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic), with applications to economics, business and finance. Basic regression. An intuitive introduction to limits, the tangent line, and differentiation of algebraic and exponential functions. Strong emphasis on applications to business, economics, and finance.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Mathematics
Economics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Diogo Pinheiro
Date Added:
07/23/2021
PSYC 7765G: Statistical Method Applications I
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Provides an introduction to statistical software environments for practical data-analysis, advanced simulation techniques, and reproducible reporting for psychological research. Topics and scope reproducible statistics for psychologists with R

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Psychology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Interactive
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Matthew Crump
Date Added:
07/13/2021
English 1012
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We go to college not just to study something but to learn how to do something – something that those who don’t earn a degree normally do. What is our earned expertise? What is that extra something that college gives us the opportunity and support to pursue?

One answer is that college allows us to learn how to do research. Research involves the creation of questions worth asking, it involves gathering the materials that we need to address these questions, and it involves synthesizing our findings with our questions to come up with credible answers.

In our ENGL 1012 seminar, we will learn how to use the research methods practiced in literary studies. Within this discipline, researchers explore questions of identity, politics, history and aesthetics, among many others, by studying representations of people, places and events in literature. To guide our understanding of research through literature, we will be focusing on the kinds of questions that emerge from the study of early African American culture. We will read narratives of enslavement and resistance from the late 1700s through to the mid 1800s, and we will also read scholarly texts that help understand the historical and political context within which these early African American narratives were first written and read. The readings will serve as an inspiration and evidentiary base to pose questions such as – what is the use of personal narratives and fictional stories in society? How does reading literature change the way in which people think? When we talk about history, are we discussing the past or is our focus on understanding the present? How do race, class, and gender affect the lives and experiences of oppressed people? What strategies have the oppressed used to fight back and change the circumstances of their marginalization?

The written assignments for our seminar will teach us how to address such questions by doing research, and they will encourage us to come up with questions of our own. We will learn how the process of writing allows us to construct answers to our questions and express the value of our opinions. By moving through a series of written exercises that feed into each other, all the students in this course will produce a final research paper that draws on the general theme of the course and makes judicious use of the resources at the library to ask and answer a question of their own design. Possible topics for research can include food, fashion, celebration, medicine, religion, science, among many others. The research paper is a curiosity-driven project where students have the freedom to pursue their interests, within the specific context of early African American culture.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Param Ajmera
Date Added:
06/24/2021
People and Language: Anthropology
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Language, whether verbal or non-verbal, is one of the most universal social practices in our world — all people use language. But language use is also incredibly culture-specific, anchored in particular contexts, communities, groups, identities, and modalities. Linguistic anthropology, one of four fields in the discipline of anthropology, studies how people use language in their everyday lives. It is holistic and comparative in its approach to the study of humanity and stresses qualitative research, often through ethnography. This course will introduce students to the basic concepts, theories, and methods of linguistic anthropology, and demonstrate how language, culture, power, and politics are interrelated in the construction and dismantling of social structures. As COVID-19 continues to plague our world, human interaction is experiencing a fundamental shift that invites us to reflect on how and why we communicate the way we do. In this class, we will turn to the current social, historical, and political moment to guide our analysis of the linguistic and discursive manifestations of social inequalities.

Some of the questions we will ask include:

What is language? What is a language?
How do languages historically become languages?
What are the connections between language and our bodies?
How do language and identity inform and interact with each other?
In what ways does language influence politics and vice versa?
What are the differences between the terms creole, patois, dialect, language?
How do we learn language? What do we learn through language?
Has media changed language? How? Why? When?

bell hooks wrote: “Shifting how we think about language and how we use it necessarily alters how we know what we know” (1994: 226). Join us in working towards exactly that! [This course site and syllabus was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship, hosted by the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center.]

Read more about the course design here: https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2020/11/09/languaging-in-the-cuny-academic-commons/

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Anthony Harb
Date Added:
06/24/2021
Performance of Children's Literature
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Performance surrounds us every day and has always been a vital part of conveying narrative. Oral Interpretation is “the art of communicating to an audience a work of literary art in its intellectual emotional and aesthetic entirety.” (Gura, 2010 Oral Interpretation) I look forward to working with you all as we explore storytelling through children’s literature to bring to life the words on a page.

This semester we will work on communication and interpretation skills by exploring storytelling cultures through a study of children’s literature and related texts that have been told and retold for generations. We will do this by tapping into our creativity through a combination of oral presentations and written work. This course is a space for experimenting with techniques of presentation and our own interpretation of the stories and performances that surround us.

Subject:
Literature
Performing Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Game
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Shiraz Biggie
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Introduction to Philosophy
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The world is a curious place. As children, we wonder about it. To questions like: “Why is the sky blue?” and “How do microwaves work?” we get initially satisfactory answers. To questions like “Why should I do what my parents tell me to do?” and “How do you know for sure there aren’t aliens on Mars?”, we get less satisfactory answers. Questions, and their possible answers, are the currency of philosophy, and (as you will see) permeate every aspect of human life. This class will interrogate our philosophically imbued experiences of the world by exploring questions like: How can we distinguish what is real from what is not real? How is knowledge shaped or constrained by one’s location? Why is truth important? What is morally important and why? Is it time for the revolution? Where is the self located? Are there different ‘kinds’ of people? In what sense do race(s) and gender(s) exist? You will leave this class with an understanding of some philosophical issues found in three main branches of Western philosophy: epistemology, value theory, and metaphysics.

Content-Based Objectives

Acquire an understanding of philosophical issues found in the study of epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics.
Learn about central arguments and positions on said problems.

Skill-Based Objectives

Critically examine arguments (test consistency among claims, test limits, or test capacity to address a relevant issue or problem).
Practice active listening, including the skill of charitable interpretation.
Identify arguments, including premises and conclusions.
Interrogate the weaknesses of one’s own view and the strengths of alternative views.
Formulate original arguments and foresee strong objections.
Identify and explain how philosophical concepts inform discussions of real-world issues.
Cultivate critical writing and communication skills.
Develop a philosophical curiosity that will serve you outside of the classroom.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Michael Greer
Date Added:
06/14/2021
The Dispossessed: Anarchism & Utopia
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

This course is concerned with how practices of reading and writing can be wielded
as technologies of imagination and utopia. More precisely, we will approach, though
perhaps never arrive at, utopia through various theories and practices of anarchism.
What do we mean by ‘anarchism’? This is a question we will pursue again and again
through engaging with a plethora of different forms, practices, and expressions of
anarchism: essays, manifestos, conversations, speeches, poetry, fiction, among
others.

As we read, we will write and converse and hopefully practice our own
nascent form of anarchism centered around that most generous and natural of
human activities: sharing. Sharing writing, ideas, questions, uncertainties, doubts,
needs – rather than march linearly forward in the drive to reach some predetermined
end point, we will attempt to learn with and from one another in an echo of the
Zapatistas, not in order to provide answers, but to practice and celebrate our ability
to pose questions.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Jeff Voss
Date Added:
06/14/2021
TREM 1165: Introduction to Mass Media
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Survey of the history, industry practices, and controversies involved in the media of mass communication. Mainstream mass media of books, newspapers, magazines, film, radio, recordings, television, and the Internet. Analysis of news, entertainment, advertising, and public relations strategies, as well as media impact, legal issues, and ethics.

Subject:
Communication
Anthropology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
George Rodman
Date Added:
06/07/2021
MATH 1311: Thinking Mathematically
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Problem solving and applications of mathematical thinking in the real world and in the ideal world of mathematics. Elementary number theory, probability, geometry, and their applications. Number systems and the sizes of various infinite sets. Additional topics chosen from: elementary topology, discrete mathematics, chaos and fractals, probability. Satisfies Pathways Required Core Math and Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Simulation
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Jeff Suzuki
Date Added:
06/07/2021
BUSN 7255X/PSYC 7247G: Managing Diversity in the Global Economy
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This course is based upon the belief that the quality of the educational environment depends both on “me and you.” I will put extra effort to facilitate the learning process and I expect you to do the same. Such a belief will be implemented by creating a classroom environment in which students will challenge concepts and ideas positively, openly, and respectfully.

Drawing upon research in the social science and business disciplines, this course will provide you with an-depth knowledge of diversity issues in a global context and develop your cross-cultural communication and negotiation skills. You will also learn the politico-legal, economic, cultural, and business environments of one the following countries: China, India, Japan, France, Brazil, Russia, and South Africa in a comparative perspective with those of the United States.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Bibliography
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Hervé Queneau
Date Added:
06/03/2021
BUSN 7250X/PSYC 7246G: International Human Resource Management
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This course is based upon the belief that the quality of the educational environment depends both on “me and you.” I will put extra effort to facilitate the learning process and I expect you to do the same. Such a belief will be implemented by creating a classroom environment in which students will challenge concepts and ideas positively, openly, and respectfully.

The course examines human resource decisions and practices in an international context. Topics include recruiting, selection, expatriation, repatriation, training, career management, performance management, compensation, and cross-cultural issues.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Hervé Queneau
Date Added:
06/03/2021
CISC 3810 Database Systems
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Introduction to database systems. Comparison to file processing systems. Data models. Relational, hierarchical, and network systems. Database design. Normal forms. Study of several real-world database management systems, with an emphasis on microcomputer applications. Database recovery query and transaction processing, concurrency. Distributed and object-oriented databases. After successful completion of this course, students will have achieved proficiency in data modeling use the Entity-Relationship Model, Relational Database Design Techniques, Basic and Intermediate SQL query creation, and Database access techniques from current programming languages.

Subject:
Computer Science
Computing and Information
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Harry Goldberg
Date Added:
06/02/2021
BIOL 4001: Field Botany
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Since we live in an urban environment with many trees, shrubs, and flower plantings this course is designed so that each student will always be able to walk down the street and have some familiarity with their environs. To that end, each student will learn to identify approximately 50-60 trees and shrubs and know them by their common name, scientific name and family, as well as some annuals and perennials commonly used as bedding plants. Students will learn some basic the botanical concepts, which are used in, plant identification, such as botanical structural features used in phylogeny and taxonomy of plants. In addition to this, students will get an overview of the ecological and economic aspects specific to urban botany.

Subject:
Botany
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Student Guide
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Anna Petrovicheva
Date Added:
06/02/2021
CISC 3810 Database Systems
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Introduction to database systems. Comparison to file processing systems. Data models. Relational, hierarchical, and network systems. Database design. Normal forms. Study of several real-world database management systems, with an emphasis on microcomputer applications. Database recovery query and transaction processing, concurrency. Distributed and object-oriented databases.

Subject:
Computing and Information
Material Type:
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Harry Goldberg
Date Added:
05/26/2021
SOCY 2401 Sociology of Children
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This course focuses on children, understood as those who are below 18 years old. In the class, we will explore childhood from a sociological, comparative, and public policy perspectives. We will analyze different topics that involve children’s experience, such as the reproduction of inequality at elementary schools; race and racism in the health system; transgender kids; welfare policies and child poverty; and children’s immigration experience.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Marcela F. González
Date Added:
05/26/2021
BUSN 3230: Small Business Management and Minority Entrepreneurship
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Entrepreneurship has become a major source of economic growth and job creation in the United States. As the number of small businesses increases in the U.S. economy, so does the need to prepare students in entrepreneurship. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to effectively start, operate, and develop a business venture or non-profit organization.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Hervé Queneau
Date Added:
05/16/2021
BUSN 7260X Entrepreneurship in a Global Economy
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Entrepreneurship has become a major source of economic growth and job creation in the United States. As the number of small businesses increases in the U.S. economy, so does the need to prepare students in entrepreneurship. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to effectively start, operate, and develop a business venture or a non-profit organization.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Hervé Queneau
Date Added:
05/16/2021
MUSC 3101: MUSIC IN GLOBAL AMERICA
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All in all, this course equips students to develop globally-engaged perspectives on musical cultures and to reflect critically on music’s relation to society for them to engage with sound and society in ethical ways.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Bibliography
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Farah Zahra
Date Added:
05/14/2021
Anthropology 1200: Human Origins
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This course aims to teach students about the evolutionary history, ecology, and behavior of humans and other primates, while also providing information on a range of topics including the history of evolutionary thought, natural selection, basic genetics, and elementary skeletal anatomy. No prior courses in anthropology or evolutionary biology are required.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Abigail Colby
Colin McDonald
Date Added:
05/14/2021
Research Methods for Psychology: A Textbook for PSYC 3450: Experimental Psychology
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This textbook is an adaptation of one originally written by Paul C. Price (California State University, Fresno) and adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

This adaptation constitutes the Brooklyn College edition by Matthew J. C. Crump (Brooklyn College and Graduate Center of the City University of New York). This newest adaptation incorporates the second Canadian edition by Rajiv S. Jhangiani (Kwantlen Polytechnic University) and I-Chant A. Chiang (Quest University Canada) and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. And, incorporates the second U.S. edition authored by Dana C. Leighton (Southern Arkansas University) and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Revisions in the current edition are listed by the change logs in the github repository.

Research Methods in Psychology - Brooklyn College Edition by Paul C. Price, Rajiv Jhangiani, I-Chant A. Chiang, Dana C. Leighton, & Matthew J. C. Crump is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Matthew Crump
Paul Price
Date Added:
04/12/2021
ARTD 3062 GRAD: Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism
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Art 3062 Graduate level: Same as Art 3062 with extra readings and projects.
Art 3062 focuses on major artists and themes in European art, mainly French, during the second half of the nineteenth century. Art and literature and new optical theories of color and light are explored. Questions of politics, gender, race, colonialism, exhibition strategies, urbanism and the landscape are problematized. Major artists include, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Lewis, Monet, Cassatt, Morisot, Cezanne, Seurat, Van Gogh, Gauguin.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Mona Hadler
Date Added:
04/12/2021
ART 3062: Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism
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Art 3062 focusses on major artists and themes in European art, mainly French, during the second half of the nineteenth century. Art and literature and new optical theories of color and light are explored. Questions of politics, gender, race, colonialism, exhibition strategies, urbanism and the landscape are problematized. Major artists include, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Lewis, Monet, Cassatt, Morisot, Cezanne, Seurat, Van Gogh, Gauguin

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Mona Hadler
Date Added:
04/12/2021
CLAS 3209: After Alexander: A Confluence of Cultures
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Cultural and socio-political developments in the aftermath of Alexander’s conquests from western Anatolia to the Indus, including Egypt and the edges of Arabia. Focused regional studies, evincing the plurality of cross-cultural exchange. Broad surveys of developments in warfare, economy, the arts, myth, religion, and family structures, demonstrating common cross-regional developments. (Not open to students who have completed Core Curriculum 3209.)

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Liv Mariah Yarrow
Date Added:
04/12/2021
CLAS 3304/HIST3024: From Julius Caesar to Constantine
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A historical survey covering the Roman civil wars that led to the Principate (Imperial Period), Julio-Claudian Period and subsequent Dynasties, finishing with crises of the third century CE, the transformation into the divided Dominate (post 284 CE) and finally reunified and re invented under Constantine. The diversity of the Roman experience across its vast geographical territory, different ethnic and religious groups, and social hierarchies is emphasized. This course is the same as History 3024. Prerequisite: English 1 or permission of the chairperson.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Liv Mariah Yarrow
Date Added:
04/12/2021
CHEM 1007- Chemistry in the Kitchen for Sustainability (Juszczak)
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Course Goals and Learning Objectives. The goal of this course is to give the student a basic understanding of chemistry and physical processes in the context of food chemistry, metabolism and cooking. The course also necessarily makes connections to the future sustainability of food and water. We aim to prepare the student for the increasingly urgent and complex national dialogue on the interrelated topics of global climate change, energy, pollution, extinction and the food supply. The specific objectives of this course are to provide the student with the basic vocabulary of chemistry, and a basic understanding of the experimental process as it relates to food chemistry and cooking.

Subject:
Nutrition
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Laura Juszczak
Date Added:
04/12/2021
Geographic Information System and Data Visualization Applications
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Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Data Visualization Applications are driving forces behind the recent explosion in the "Digital Humanities." They enable scholars and students alike to ask new kinds of questions, and to illustrate the answers in powerful ways. This site intends to provide an overview of popular GIS and DVA platforms, both proprietary and open access. It summarizes the degree of difficulty involved in using these platforms, discusses support available for users at Brooklyn College, and gives links to training and tutorials freely available on the web.

Subject:
Measurement and Data
Physical Geography
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Interactive
Reference
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Miriam Deutch
Date Added:
04/12/2021
PRLS 2250 Digital Life Stories: Chicana & Latina Testimonio
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3 hours; 3 credits. Latina feminist tradition of testimonios, autobiographical narratives, short-stories, poems, and oral histories to reveal the complexity of Chicana/Latina identity. The connection between life experience and new knowledge creation. Theorize Latinidades at the intersection of racism, sexism and heterosexism. Re-think feminism, women and gender studies; Latin@, American and cultural studies. Students will create their own digital life stories. This course is the same as Women’s and Gender Studies 3152 and American Studies 3310.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Laura Pavon Aramburu
Date Added:
04/06/2021
Phil 3105: Landmarks in History of Philosophy
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Philosophy means the “love of wisdom.” In its ancient Greek conception, it is a form of love. But what is love?

In this course, we will read classical and contemporary philosophical works on the nature of love and its relevance for ethics, especially in interpersonal relations.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Daniel Campos
Date Added:
04/06/2021
SPCL 7914X: Psychological Assessment of Diverse Students
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Psychoeducational assessment of language-minority and culturally diverse children and adolescents. Approaches to nonbiased assessment, including testing in the child’s native language, bilingual testing, adaptation of standardized instruments and techniques, and dynamic assessment. Students will administer psychoeducational assessment batteries to language-minority individuals, interpret test data, and write reports. Field-based assignments.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Daniela Bejarano
Date Added:
04/06/2021
Writing Across The Curriculum
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Welcome to the Brooklyn College Writing Across the Curriculum resource page. Here instructors and students alike can find a variety of documents to employ writing as a tool to develop writing skills, and to improve critical and creative thinking. Review the tabs above to access downloadable .pdf resource files.

More information about WAC is available at http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/wac

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reference
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Writing Across the Curriculum Fellows
Date Added:
03/19/2021
ITAL 1020: Italian Basic Language Skills 2
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This is the second of a two-semester introductory sequence. The emphasis will be on Italian cultural patterns of social interactions, vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, nuances, and Italian cultural exchanges. Greater emphasis is on the verbal application of the Italian language, personal and public exchanges, and everyday interactions with Italian-speaking people. This class goes into greater depth with more difficult pronunciation and dialogue exchange.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Alessandro Zammataro
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/19/2021
Phil 3203: Introductory Formal Logic
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We are often presented with arguments designed to convince us to believe certain things, or to act in certain ways. Most of the time we do pretty well at sorting out the bad arguments from the good ones, but what exactly are the grounds on which we do this? One criterion is surely that an argument should be valid, that is, that its conclusion should follow from its premises. But just what is it for an assertion to follow from others? In this course we will develop a formal framework within which validity, along with other central concepts of deductive logic, can be rigorously defined and studied.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Matthew Moore
Date Added:
03/19/2021
COMM 1001/CASD 1205: Introduction to Communication/Modern Communication Theories
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Introduction to the theory and practice of the discipline of communication. How people use messages to generate meanings within and across various contexts. How human communication influences and is influenced by the relationships we form, our institutions, society, organizations, and media. (Not open to students who took Communication 1001 or Speech/Communications Arts, Sciences and Disorders 1205.) Prerequisite: None
Course Objectives
To introduce the field of communication, its vocabulary, research fields, history, development, and concerns
To critically examine how communication practices at the personal group, institutional, and societal levels reflect social norms and play a decisive role in defining the nature of the relationships at each of those levels
To survey the ideas, principles, models and majors theories involved in various forms of human communication
To appreciate why competent communication is necessary for a successful personal, social, professional, and public life
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course students will:
Become familiar with the basic terminology associated with the field of communication
Understand the history and development of the discipline of communication as a field of scholarly inquiry incorporating humanistic, social scientific and esthetic viewpoints
Become conversant with the basic principles of the various communication research fields, such as verbal and nonverbal, interpersonal, small group, organizational, mediated, persuasive, rhetorical, health, genfer, and intercultural communication
Appreciate the impact communication has in our daily lies and its importance in civic engagement
Be introduced to some of the major models, theories, and methodologies associated with communication

Subject:
Communication
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Desiree Frieson
Emily Fairey
Sharona Levy
Date Added:
03/19/2021
CASD 7313 / 7326X Mecca for Neurogenics
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Mecca for Neurogenics is a site developed by Prof. Sharon Beaumont-Bowman of Brooklyn College. Although it is based on two courses she teaches in the Department of Speech Communication Arts & Sciences, it is designed as an interactive repository for many resources on Neurogenics.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Sharon Beaumont-Bowman
Date Added:
03/19/2021
ARTD 7820: Video Art
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This graduate session is a studio class on the topic of video art. Students, through creative projects, readings, and screenings, will develop a practical and conceptual approach to the medium. Video, although used as an artists' material since the late 1950's, has undergone many transformations both due to technical innovation and shifting cultural and artistic landscapes. Video art today is in such wide use by artists in general that it can seem barely noteworthy beyond a materials footnote. However, Video Art, born during a time of the intersection of television culture, conceptual art, and performance art, retains traces of all of these today. This seminar will provide a useful introduction to Video Art's history, methods, and expressive capacities. Technically, we will look at digital editing and compositing techniques as well as mining the characteristics of the many camera technologies available today.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Jennifer McCoy
Date Added:
03/19/2021
Heritage Language Programs: Arabic, Chinese, Creole, Spanish, Russian: 1038 and 2018 Courses
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Welcome to the Heritage Language Program at Brooklyn College!
The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures offers Heritage Language Programs in Arabic, Chinese, Haitian Creole, and Spanish. Our Heritage Language Programs consist of two-semester sequences of courses that prepare students to take content courses in the language. The Heritage Language Programs include beginning and intermediate courses for bilingual learners who have had little or no formal education in the language, but have a connection to the language through community and family ties. Our programs will expand the oral and written communication skills of heritage language learners through a project-based approach to learning.

These courses use the language students have grown-up listening to at home as the foundation for developing their proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking the home language. We know that the proficiency levels and experiences with the home language vary greatly among heritage speakers. In our Heritage Language Programs, heritage speakers of all levels (beginning, intermediate or advanced) can take courses that have been created specifically to respond to their unique needs and build upon the skill set of the heritage learner at different stages of development.

Heritage learners can both meet the Brooklyn College language requirement and continue to expand their knowledge of Arabic, Chinese, Haitian Creole, Russian and Spanish and further develop their communicative skills.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Reference
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
BC Heritage Language Instructors
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/19/2021
SPCL 7764 Education Law & Ethics
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School law and ethics as they affect the policies, organization, and administration of public and private schools

I hope that you will find this course fun, interesting, and useful. No previous knowledge of education law or legal research is assumed. The course focuses on the legal framework of American elementary and secondary school policies at the federal, state, and local levels. By course's end, students will be able to:

meet all relevant national standards, below
articulate the structure of the American legal system as it relates to education law and ethics and to map legal material within that structure;
(3) identify and access law-related material from libraries and on-line;

(4) relate fact situations arising from practice to substantive legal/ethical areas including church/state issues; free expression and due process rights; special education; racial, national origin, and gender discrimination; and the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (currently ESSA);

(5) navigate educator/lawyer/policy-making relationships from the perspective of each discipline for mutual benefit; and

(6) apply legal and lobbying strategies to policy development and implementation.

Subject:
Education
Law
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
David Bloomfield
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/19/2021
SOCY 2600 / WGST 3420 Gender and Society
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This website serves as an online platform for my course SOCY 2600 / WGST 3420 "Gender and Society."
The site provides students with free access to the course material. In unit I, we (attempt to) define gender and sex. In unit II, we study landmark feminist struggles in the United States. In unit III, we zoom-in into lived experiences of oppression and resistance.

Subject:
Sociology
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Marianne Madoré
Date Added:
03/19/2021
MUSIC 1300: Music: Its Language, History, and Culture
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Doug Cohen's Music 1300 is a site for students of Music Appreciation, both at Brooklyn College and around the world. We feature open access web resources, and resources available to the CUNY community. We are committed to the use of Open Education Resources (OER). Click on the tabs and dropdown menus to navigate to the lower level pages.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Reference
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
BC Music Department
Douglas Cohen
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/19/2021
FORUMS (Free and Open Resources for Undergraduate Music Study)
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FORUMS is a collection of open online resources supporting post-secondary instruction of music in general studies. FORUMS includes links to authentic, academic and scholarly materials; pedagogical materials. FORUMS seeks to build community among gen ed music teachers. See the FORUMS and community box below for more information. In this prototype pilot version (FORUMS v.1.1), the best way to navigate the site is to use the pull-down tabs from the above menu. FORUMS’ purposes are:

1. to provide an access point to collected, evaluated open access music sites for undergraduate students and faculty;

2. to develop community among those teaching undergraduate general education students; and

3. to support the teaching of music to adult learners, especially students in general studies college courses.

Site users include, but are not limited to: students and teachers of music in general studies classes and adult learners of music worldwide.

Contributors include, but are not limited to: music educators, music performers, musicologists, ethnomusicologists, museum and archive curators and educators, music librarians, SoTL specialists, and others with expertise related to teaching music to adult learners.

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Reading
Reference
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Emily Fairey
Jane Palmquist
Date Added:
03/19/2021
Digital Tool Box for Teaching and Scholarship
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The Digital Tool Box for Teaching and Scholarship, created by Brooklyn College Library's OER Developers, is dedicated to exploring and evaluating some of the many digital tools available on the web. We will explore various tools, discussing how they can be used in classrooms as learning objects and will also provide links to interesting and exciting projects where they are used. This toolbox will also touch on accessibility in digital scholarship and creation. Since this toolbox is part of the CUNY and SUNY 2017-19 Open Educational Resources Initiative, we are committing to present tools which are openly available.

Subject:
Computing and Information
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Colin McDonald
Emily Fairey
Miriam Deutch
Date Added:
03/19/2021
PIMA 7220: Teaching Practicum
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An immersive practical university-level teaching course designed for students in terminal degree programs. Syllabus and course schedule design, development of assignments, research, preparation for lectures, preparation of class materials. Evaluation and outcomes assessment, development of teaching style and classroom personality. Content of practical teaching will compliment the course PIMA 7210: “...history, theory, and criticism of contemporary collaborative performance media, including music, theater, dance, radio, performance art, and other forms. Emphasis on investigation of collaborative process, community involvement, and use of technology.”

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Jennifer McCoy
Date Added:
03/19/2021
PHIL 2101H Introduction to the Problems of Philosophy
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Students will gain a basic understanding of the broad discipline of philosophy.
Students will develop their ability to write and verbally communicate their ideas; in general, they will be able to formulate an argument in support of or in opposition to a claim, and specifically, they will be able to formulate an argument in relation to key philosophical questions with regard to the issues examined in the course.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
BC Philosophy Department
Dena Shottenkirk
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/19/2021
PHIL 2101: Introduction to the Problems of Philosophy
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Survey of basic philosophical problems and different solutions proposed by philosophers. Such topics as the nature and scope of knowledge, meaning and verification, the existence of God, determinism and free will, the mind-body problem, and the nature of moral judgments. Satisfies Pathways Flexible Core Individual and Society requirement. (Not open to students who are enrolled in or have completed Philosophy 1.2 or 3105 [2] or Core Studies 10 or CORC 1210.)

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Robert Lurz
Date Added:
03/19/2021
PHIL 3410H Epistemology
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The aims of the course are to acquaint students with important philosophical works and theories in areas of knowledge, reality, and values; and to acquaint students with characteristic philosophical methods of analyzing concepts and critically evaluating arguments in support of theories. By the end of the semester, students are expected to be able to clearly express (in writing and speech) a few perennial philosophical issues (e.g., freedom of the will, the question of personal identity, the possibility and scope of knowledge, the objective status of moral values) and philosophical theories (e.g., determinism, compatibilism, skepticism, idealism, realism, relativism, and dualism). Students are expected to be familiar with a number of important philosophical figures (e.g., Descartes, Kant, and Mill), and be able to interpret and analyze key selections from the writings of these figures. Finally, students are expected to be able to identify, explain, and evaluate philosophical arguments.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Robert Lurz
Date Added:
03/19/2021
PHYS 2100: General Physics II
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Course Goals: Course Description: This course is a continuation of General Physics I. Introduction to light, electricity, and modern physics. Intended for students interested in the biological sciences, medicine, or dentistry. (Not open to students who are enrolled in or have completed Physics 2.5.) Prerequisite: Physics 1 or 1.5; or Physics 1.2 with a grade of C or higher. Enrollment Requirements: PHYS. 1100 OR PHYS. 1150 OR PHYS. 1112 WITH A GRADE C OR HIGHER IS REQUIRED TO TAKE THIS COURSE. Requirement Designation: Regular Liberal Arts.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
BC Physics Department
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/19/2021