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AAS 232 African Civilizations
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Exploration of the development of African civilizations from the origin of humankind to the present day. Their contributions to the development of the continent and the major world civilizations. The course carries us through Africa‰Ûªs major civilizations clusters, and offers a comparative survey extending from the Nile Valley Civilizations, through the Niger River Civilizations, to the Bantu cluster comprising the Central, Southern and Swahili Civilizations. Particular attention is paid to religious and philosophical beliefs, literature and the arts, social and political organization, economic, scientific, and technological developments. Also highlighted are contributions of African women in the history and development of civilization, as well as contributions of Africa and Africans to the World.
The full course site is available at https://aas232.commons.gc.cuny.edu

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Ngo-Ngijol Banoum, Bertrade
Date Added:
10/01/2019
AAS 267 African American Literature
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A survey course that will take us from the early days of enslavement to the present. We will read, analyze, and discuss literary texts written by African Americans, paying particular attention to the political, historical and social context that informs these texts.
The full course site is available at https://aas267.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Rice, Anne
Date Added:
04/01/2018
ANTH 2140: Anthropology of Food
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As organisms, humans need to eat to live. As cultural beings, eating and food provide some of the most basic ways in which humans define themselves. One group’s delicacies are another’s taboos, and what defines comfort foods and favorite dishes shifts drastically across cultures and individuals. Eating and food are simultaneously profoundly personal, deeply cultural, inherently economic, and increasingly political. This course is organized around the production, circulation, and consumption of food, and the political and economic effects of those processes. Students will learn to use food as an analytical entry point for thinking about relationships among humans and with non-human beings.

Subject:
Agriculture
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Colin Pitet
Date Added:
03/08/2021
ANTH 3420 Urban Archaeology OER
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About Urban Archaeology
Archaeology is undoubtedly most famous for its exploration and discovery of “wonderful things” from the deep past in “exotic” places: Tutankhamun’s tomb! Lost Maya cities! Archaeologists are also keen sift through and ask questions of ancient garbage: What do these tools at Stonehenge suggest about Neolithic and Bronze Age social networks? These discoveries and questions are important for understanding where we came from. However, more and more archaeologists are turning their attention, their theory, and their methods to the recent past and contemporary worlds. This course explores a body of work that advances these efforts in American urban places and considers debates that make the more recent American urban world its object. The course then asks students to assess and evaluate various aspects of American urban life through exposure to a broad range of archaeological case studies.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Kelly Britt
Paul L Hebert
Date Added:
03/15/2021
ARH 141 Introduction to the History of Modern Art
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A study of the principles of art applied to visual forms, with emphasis on modern art of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Europe and the United States.
The full course site is available at https://arh141.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Jordan, Sharon L
Date Added:
04/01/2018
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Simon 2019)
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Introduce students to major works of art from cultures around the world, spanning ancient to modern periods. We will focus on developing skills of formal analysis by closely studying works of painting, sculpture, and architecture. We will also discuss the objects chosen in their historical, political, sociological, and religious contexts in order to better understand their meaning and significance.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 3066: MODERN ART
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This course will examine the art of the first half of the twentieth century. We will consider the works studies within their relevant political and cultural contexts. Topics addressed will include the rise of abstraction, the liberation of color, the interest in the subconscious. We will begin with precedents to Modernism in the 19th Century and will conclude with WWII. Additionally, students will learn methods of art historical research and develop skills of visual analysis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
06/18/2020
ART 7184G Museum Education
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Entails exploration of a variety of methodological approaches to object-based learning within a museum setting. Our goal is the achievement of a comprehensive understanding of methods in museum education.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Chris Richards
Date Added:
03/10/2021
Advanced Spanish Composition
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¡Hola! Welcome to SPN 117 Advanced Spanish Composition, also listed as “Writing intensive”. In this page you will find everything related to our class: syllabus, readings, assignments, bios (about us, as writers!), other resources, and calendar.

We will explore, learn and practice several modes of writing with the aim of producing texts of autobiography in Spanish. Why autobiography? Because we all have a story to tell and especially you: Why are you taking this advanced writing class in Spanish? Why do you speak Spanish? That is a story that deserves to be told! This class is designed to help students sharpen their tools in Spanish with personal expression. How is your family history? How was the journey that brought you here?
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¡Hola! Bienvenidas a SPN 117, Advanced Spanish Composition, también conocida como “Writing intensive”. En esta página encontrarás todo lo relacionado a nuestra clase: el syllabus, las lecturas, las tareas, las biografías (¡nuestras, como escritoras!), así como otros recursos y el calendario.

Exploraremos, aprenderemos y practicaremos varios tipos de escritura con el objetivo de escribir autobiografía en español. ¿Por qué la autobiografía? Porque todas tenemos una historia qué contar y especialmente, tú: ¿por qué estás tomando esta clase de escritura avanzada en español? ¿Por qué hablas español? Esa es una historia que amerita ser contada. Esta clase está diseñada para ayudar a las estudiantes a agudizar sus herramientas de la lengua desde la expresión personal. ¿Cómo es la historia de tu familia? ¿Cómo fue el viaje que te trajo hasta aquí?

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Bronx Community College
Author:
Natasha Tiniacos
Date Added:
06/14/2021
American Identities: AMST 1010
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This course is an introduction to American Studies through the questions of identity. How are our identities formed and how do they function? What does it mean to be “American,” who claims this identity, and on what terms? How do American identities shape—and how are they shaped by—factors such as class, race, ethnicity, gender, language, nation, and sexuality?

This semester, we will examine diverse American identities, with an emphasis on the social and cultural forces that mold them. We will explore the structural differences that divide individuals and groups, and ways that people challenge or transcend these divisions. This interdisciplinary course integrates materials from literary studies, history, ethnic and gender studies, and sociology. We will read some academic theories about identity, but will more often read what a wide range of Americans have written about their own individual and collective identities.

The aim is to help you better understand your own and other people’s identities, the languages and conventions that writers use to analyze identities, and how varied perspectives on identity in the United States and the Americas speak to—and at times against—one another. Rather than settle on a final definition of either “America” or “identity,” we will explore both as products of on-going dialogue, debate, and change.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Conor Tomas Reed
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/15/2021
The American Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives
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This OER (open educational resource) is to act as an ongoing resource for those full and part-time faculty teaching Brooklyn College’s Anthropology Course, ANTH 3135 — The US Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives. This is a living document, which came out of discussions among instructors teaching this course and will continue to grow as we continue to meet each semester to discuss the course.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Meghan Ference
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Astronomy 141
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Welcome to Astronomy 141. Through this course you’ll have an understanding of the sky, Earth, Moon and the Sun, the solar system and the universe. This laboratory course introduces the fundamentals of astronomy such as: the apparent motion of the sky, Sun, Moon and planets; the nature of light; gravity; the properties of planets; the life cycles of stars; and the structure of the universe. Laboratory and computer exercises will be used, and we will conduct one nighttime lab.

As the learning outcomes, students who succeed in this course may eventually respond to:

How does the process of science work, and how does that process manifest itself in astronomy?
How is astronomy of practical use? How has astronomy impacted our understanding of our world?
What is a planet, and how are planets similar to—and different from—one another?
What is the interior of the Earth like, and how do we know?
What is a star? How are the stars similar to and different from one another?
How did the universe get started? What is likely to happen to the universe in the distant future?
[This project was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship at the Mina Rees Library, The Graduate Center].

Read more about the course design here: https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2020/10/19/inclusive-education-and-research-for-astronomy/

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Yuzhe Song
Date Added:
06/24/2021
BIOL 4001: Field Botany
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Since we live in an urban environment with many trees, shrubs, and flower plantings this course is designed so that each student will always be able to walk down the street and have some familiarity with their environs. To that end, each student will learn to identify approximately 50-60 trees and shrubs and know them by their common name, scientific name and family, as well as some annuals and perennials commonly used as bedding plants. Students will learn some basic the botanical concepts, which are used in, plant identification, such as botanical structural features used in phylogeny and taxonomy of plants. In addition to this, students will get an overview of the ecological and economic aspects specific to urban botany.

Subject:
Botany
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Student Guide
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Anna Petrovicheva
Date Added:
06/02/2021
Comparative Studies in Cultures and Transformation
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This course will be a thematic exploration of culture and transformation in two distinct non-US and non-European areas. We will discuss the meanings of culture and ways cultures are studied and portrayed. We will explore the major drivers for cultural change in the modern world such as colonization, modernization, development, and globalization. We will use two case studies to examine important themes related to cultural transformation such as gender, race and ethnic relations, religion, nationalism, power relations, cultural encounter, and constructions of tradition and modernity.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Jessica Santos-López
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Contemporary Spanish Literature in Translation
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Contemporary Spanish Literature in Translation (SPAN264) will examine, in English, major Spanish authors, literary periods and artistic trends through narrative, poetic, dramatic and visual filmic cultural artifacts produced from 1936-1940 to the present day while learning about the historical, political and cultural contexts that surround them.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Analyze and formally interpret the assigned texts, visual and filmic artifacts.
Examine and reflect critically upon the cultural values and ideas conveyed by them.
Become familiar with basic cultural, social and political aspects of contemporary Spanish history.
Demonstrate knowledge of the themes, problems and ideas that appear in the texts.
Learn some key concepts, including literary and rhetorical terminology, for the analysis of contemporary literature and cultural production.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Cristina Pardo Porto
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Criminology
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This course aims to develop a sociological frame to describe and analyze the nature, function, and causes of “crime” and legal institutions in our society. The class begins with a broad overview of criminology as a field and some of the major classic and contemporary theories. The second part of the course reviews empirical works which illustrate, explore, and/or critique these theories. The final part of the course builds on Part 2 and reviews three recent topics of interest in modern criminology.

At the end of the course, you will be able to:
Describe, discuss, and critique arguments about how our society defines crime, why crime occurs, and how our society reacts to and controls behavior deemed “criminal”
Apply criminological theories to social problems of interest
Understand, critique, and/or apply reform and abolitionist frameworks to current key topics related to the nature and role of our criminal legal system

This course was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship, through the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center, CUNY.
Read more about the process of course design here: Criminology - A Critical and Open Approach
https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2021/03/19/criminology-a-critical-and-open-approach/

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Angela LaScala-Gruenewald
Date Added:
06/15/2021
A Critical Approach to Performance History
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World Theatre I is meant to provide a historical survey of performance practices across the globe covering early theatrical forms until broadly the 15th century and traveling through performance traditions in Africa, Western Europe, Asia, and the Americas. This course provides a historical survey of theatre across the globe, covering early theatrical forms until the 15th Century. Through traditions in Africa, Western Europe, Asia, and the Americas, we will examine a variety of theatre forms and styles, as well as individual plays, playwrights, and designers. We will study theoretical texts on theatre and performance from the periods and locales covered. We will also consider the influences on theatre from different cultural, social, political, and economic contexts, and the manners in which theatre has engaged critically and politically in different societies.

We’ll read scripts, theatre/performance theory, and look at some primary sources. All the materials for the class will be housed on this website, including our syllabus, videos from the series Theater CrashCourse, podcasts on Theatre History @Howlround Commons, Library Research Guides (Tools), and other Open Educational Resources. This site is also a work-in-progress platform for rethinking our class’s contents. It will host thoughts and open-access resources to question, research, and practice performance history. [This site was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship, hosted by the Mina Rees Library, The Graduate Center, CUNY].

Subject:
Performing Arts
History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Alex Viteri Arturo
Date Added:
06/24/2021
DFN 220 Ethnic and Therapeutic Meal Patterns
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An in-depth exploration of foods and foodways of diverse populations and cultures. Examination of the effect of ethnic, geographic, ecological and historical factors on foods, foodways, health and diet related diseases.
The full course site is available at https://culturalfoods.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Nutrition
Social Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Burt, Katherine
Date Added:
04/01/2018
Dante's Works
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This website was created by Julie Van Peteghem (Hunter College) for the course ITAL 37001 Prose Works of Dante with the support of a CUNY Academic Commons OER Faculty Teaching Fellowship during the Spring 2018 semester. A work-in-progress, the site provides the English translations of Dante’s Vita nuova, De vulgari eloquentia, Convivio, De monarchia, and the letters at zero cost, and other OER materials related to Dante’s works and world, including some created by the ITAL 37001 students. Unless otherwise indicated, the entries are written by Julie Van Peteghem.

Subject:
Languages
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Julie Van Peteghem
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Database Management Systems
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Database Management Systems - Baruch College - CIS3400
This course provides students with the background to design, implement and use database management systems in managing the data needs of an organization. It introduces, in a comparative framework, the structure, requirements, functions and evolution of database management systems. After covering conceptual data modeling and entity relationship data model the course focuses on relational data model. Students learn abstract languages such as relational algebra including their commercial implementations like SQL. Database design is introduced and discussed in detail. Concepts of data integrity, security, privacy, and concurrency control are introduced. Ethical issues in the maintenance and use of a database and globalization of information technology are also discussed. Students implement a major database application project using MS Access.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Baruch College
Author:
Di Wu
Date Added:
06/14/2021
The Dispossessed: Anarchism & Utopia
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This course is concerned with how practices of reading and writing can be wielded
as technologies of imagination and utopia. More precisely, we will approach, though
perhaps never arrive at, utopia through various theories and practices of anarchism.
What do we mean by ‘anarchism’? This is a question we will pursue again and again
through engaging with a plethora of different forms, practices, and expressions of
anarchism: essays, manifestos, conversations, speeches, poetry, fiction, among
others.

As we read, we will write and converse and hopefully practice our own
nascent form of anarchism centered around that most generous and natural of
human activities: sharing. Sharing writing, ideas, questions, uncertainties, doubts,
needs – rather than march linearly forward in the drive to reach some predetermined
end point, we will attempt to learn with and from one another in an echo of the
Zapatistas, not in order to provide answers, but to practice and celebrate our ability
to pose questions.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Jeff Voss
Date Added:
06/14/2021
The Divine Comedy in English
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The students will familiarize with Dante’s Divine Comedy 1) as a poetic and encyclopedic text that borrows and adapts from ancient texts and from contemporary culture 2) and as a text that, its turn, has influenced our imagination over the centuries.
While learning about the major characters, scenes and literary strategies of the Divine Comedy, the students will engage in discussions, research, writing and peer reviewing. Students will learn to describe a visual artifact in relation to Dante’s text.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Stefania Porcelli
Date Added:
06/24/2021
Drug Use and Policy in the US
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Human societies display remarkable creativity and persistence in the range of mind altering substances used historically and cross culturally, although drug use occupies very different social locations in different cultures and historical eras. In the modern era, the regulation of mind and mood altering substances has become enmeshed with larger systems of social control, including public health, criminal justice, immigration and economic globalization. While drug addiction is typically portrayed as an individual problem, both drug use and drug policy are fundamentally social processes, and cannot be separated from larger social and economic systems.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Naomi Braine
Date Added:
12/26/2020
ENG 121 English Composition II
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English 121 is a continuation of the work accomplished in ENG 111. ENG 121 will advance critical reading skills and essay development with an emphasis on writing analytical essays and papers based on research in various academic disciplines.
The full course site is available at https://english121.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Walia, Dhipinder
Date Added:
04/01/2018
English 1012
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We go to college not just to study something but to learn how to do something – something that those who don’t earn a degree normally do. What is our earned expertise? What is that extra something that college gives us the opportunity and support to pursue?

One answer is that college allows us to learn how to do research. Research involves the creation of questions worth asking, it involves gathering the materials that we need to address these questions, and it involves synthesizing our findings with our questions to come up with credible answers.

In our ENGL 1012 seminar, we will learn how to use the research methods practiced in literary studies. Within this discipline, researchers explore questions of identity, politics, history and aesthetics, among many others, by studying representations of people, places and events in literature. To guide our understanding of research through literature, we will be focusing on the kinds of questions that emerge from the study of early African American culture. We will read narratives of enslavement and resistance from the late 1700s through to the mid 1800s, and we will also read scholarly texts that help understand the historical and political context within which these early African American narratives were first written and read. The readings will serve as an inspiration and evidentiary base to pose questions such as – what is the use of personal narratives and fictional stories in society? How does reading literature change the way in which people think? When we talk about history, are we discussing the past or is our focus on understanding the present? How do race, class, and gender affect the lives and experiences of oppressed people? What strategies have the oppressed used to fight back and change the circumstances of their marginalization?

The written assignments for our seminar will teach us how to address such questions by doing research, and they will encourage us to come up with questions of our own. We will learn how the process of writing allows us to construct answers to our questions and express the value of our opinions. By moving through a series of written exercises that feed into each other, all the students in this course will produce a final research paper that draws on the general theme of the course and makes judicious use of the resources at the library to ask and answer a question of their own design. Possible topics for research can include food, fashion, celebration, medicine, religion, science, among many others. The research paper is a curiosity-driven project where students have the freedom to pursue their interests, within the specific context of early African American culture.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Param Ajmera
Date Added:
06/24/2021
English 220.12
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With an emphasis on close reading, English 220 is intended to develop in students the analytical and interpretive skills necessary for both written and verbal critical response to literature that is firmly grounded in the text. It also establishes a common knowledge base, however minimal, in literature in English, and it equips students with the vocabulary and techniques for describing and analyzing literary works, with an emphasis on developing critical writing skills specific to literary analysis. In addition, the course develops in students an appreciation and understanding of the aesthetic qualities of literature, as well as an awareness that literature is part of a larger ongoing cultural, social, and historical dialogue that informs, influences, and inspires our experience.

As important, English 220 introduces students to discipline specific academic writing, with an emphasis on thesis driven analytical and interpretive essays, including a substantial research paper. While each academic discipline has its own writing and research requirements, style, and conventions, 220 students will gain an understanding of the basic components of academic writing: thesis creation and development, argumentation, analytical reasoning, evidence, and the engagement of both primary and secondary sources. Students will be able to use the academic writing skills learned in this class across the disciplines, adapting them to the specific field of study they pursue.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Jacob Aplaca
Date Added:
06/24/2021
Food as Philosophy, System, Controversy
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Everyone eats. In this sense, the experience of food is common to us all. Yet the meanings we attach to food—as individuals with complex personal histories and needs, as members of particular cultures, communities, and belief systems—are remarkably diverse and powerful. In this course, we engage works by scholars, poets, and other writers to explore the significance of food as the source of inspiration and debate. This exploration will serve as a basis for our own writing. Our written responses will explore food as it relates to identity, social justice, and the environment—showing how far inquiry into one topic can stretch.

Course: ENG 110: Food as Philosophy, System, Controversy
Instructor: Nicole Cote
This project was first developed during the Open Pedagogy Fellowship (Winter 2021), through the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center.

Read more about this project: Cultivating Resources for the Future by Nicole Cote
https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2021/04/22/cultivating-resources-for-the-future/

Subject:
Literature
Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Queens College
Author:
Nicole Cote
Date Added:
05/10/2021
GEP 3750 Data Acquisition and Integration Methods for GIS Analysis
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The techniques and science of data acquisition and creation for spatial analysis in a geographic information system (GIS); includes field data collection. Students will be instructed in the use GPS devices, mobile GIS, workstation GIS, as well as data from other sources including remotely sensed data.
The full course site is available at https://gep3750.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Gorokhovich, Yuri
Date Added:
10/01/2017
General Chemistry Lab
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Chemistry is a challenging and often abstract science, but as you progress through this course we hope you will discover that chemistry is also exciting and that many of the key concepts in chemistry are both important and relevant to life on earth. Throughout this semester we will provide you with the basic skills and knowledge to think and feel like a chemist. You will learn that chemistry is exciting!

This course was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship, through the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Read more about the process of course design here: https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2021/04/29/oer-in-science-catching-up-in-stem/

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Inayah Entzminger
Date Added:
06/15/2021
History of New York City and State
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Hello and welcome to our course site for HIU348: The History of New York City and State.

In this online, writing-intensive course, we will explore several key moments in the political, cultural, and social development of New York City and State. We will focus particularly on New York City’s growth from a small colonial outpost to the metropolis of the United States and the challenges this growth presented.

This course is required for students with a major in History and a minor in Education. By the end of the class, students in this course should:

have a good understanding of events in the history of New York, especially New York City, and how historians have interpreted these events
explore the contemporary city and state and understand how current developments relate to the past
improve writing skills and engage with course material by completing a series of informal and formal writing assignments
sharpen analytical skills by engaging with primary and secondary sources

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Katie Uva
Date Added:
06/24/2021
Human Geography
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This course introduces students to the key concepts and principles of human geography. The course is designed to show how world geographic conditions such as climate, landform, natural resources, soil, space and ecology
have influenced human culture and civilization over time. We will examine the connectivity of global networks, human migration, citizenship, cultural identity, urbanization, and politics. The class will focus attention on the unequal distribution of power, resources and opportunity in order to highlight the challenges and struggles that these inequalities create.

Subject:
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Scott W. Schwartz
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish
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SPA 300 is an introduction to illustrative styles, movements, writers and cultural expressions in Latin America and Spain. It focuses on basic themes in twentieth and early twenty-first century Latin American fiction, especially the short story. Students will read and respond to issues related to twentieth and early twenty-first century Latin American fiction. Secondary sources will be consulted during class activities and as part of the written and oral assignments. There will be close reading of texts, and group discussions.

This course was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship, through the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Justo Planas-Cabreja
Date Added:
06/15/2021
Introduction to Mass Media
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In this course students will become familiar with the history, current industry practices, and controversies involved in the mainstream mass media (newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, film, recordings, and the Internet), their information and persuasion industries (news, advertising and public relations) and media issues (including impact, legal, and ethical issues).

In doing so, students will come to understand the relationships among the history of the media, their current industry practices, and the controversies that arise from these practices. A series of reading assignments, lectures, discussions (online, groups, pods) make up the course material. You are expected to read the assigned material before class and bring any questions or items for discussion. Following that discussion, we will explore areas in class that are beyond the readings.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Brian Dunphy
Colin McDonald
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Introduction to Open Digital Pedagogy
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What do we mean by “open” teaching? And how does “open” relate to “digital pedagogy”? This workshop will introduce the foundations of open digital pedagogy and provide examples from The CUNY Academic Commons, a WordPress teaching and learning platform used by faculty in a variety of graduate and undergraduate courses across CUNY.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Higher Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
CUNY Graduate Center
Author:
Laurie Hurson
Date Added:
09/08/2020
Introduction to Philosophy
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The world is a curious place. As children, we wonder about it. To questions like: “Why is the sky blue?” and “How do microwaves work?” we get initially satisfactory answers. To questions like “Why should I do what my parents tell me to do?” and “How do you know for sure there aren’t aliens on Mars?”, we get less satisfactory answers. Questions, and their possible answers, are the currency of philosophy, and (as you will see) permeate every aspect of human life. This class will interrogate our philosophically imbued experiences of the world by exploring questions like: How can we distinguish what is real from what is not real? How is knowledge shaped or constrained by one’s location? Why is truth important? What is morally important and why? Is it time for the revolution? Where is the self located? Are there different ‘kinds’ of people? In what sense do race(s) and gender(s) exist? You will leave this class with an understanding of some philosophical issues found in three main branches of Western philosophy: epistemology, value theory, and metaphysics.

Content-Based Objectives

Acquire an understanding of philosophical issues found in the study of epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics.
Learn about central arguments and positions on said problems.

Skill-Based Objectives

Critically examine arguments (test consistency among claims, test limits, or test capacity to address a relevant issue or problem).
Practice active listening, including the skill of charitable interpretation.
Identify arguments, including premises and conclusions.
Interrogate the weaknesses of one’s own view and the strengths of alternative views.
Formulate original arguments and foresee strong objections.
Identify and explain how philosophical concepts inform discussions of real-world issues.
Cultivate critical writing and communication skills.
Develop a philosophical curiosity that will serve you outside of the classroom.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Michael Greer
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Introduction to Sociology
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This course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. What is sociology? Why is it important? Over the course of the semester students will develop what C. W Mills called a “sociological imagination” that will allow them to see how individuals are shaped by social structures and institutions, and in turn recreate those institutions. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches, becoming aware of how sociologists make sense of this complex social world.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Carolina Bank Muñoz
Colin McDonald
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Introduction to Theater
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This survey course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding and greater appreciation of the theatrical form. Readings and lectures will focus on the relationship between theatrical theory and practice, the various creative/production roles essential to theatre, as well as major artists and movements throughout theatrical history. Students will analyze major works of dramatic literature to offer context for course content, as well as attend a live theatrical performance on campus.

Learning Objectives:

Theatrical Theories & Terminology: Identify and apply the fundamental concepts, theories and roles associated with modern theatrical practice and professional theatrical production (i.e. suspension of disbelief, empathy, actor, designer, Broadway, Off-Broadway, etc.).
Theatre & Creativity: Examine and define the skills, considerations and tasks associated with the creation of theatre, both individually and as a collective whole.
Theatre & Society: Evaluate and articulate how theatre is a socially-responsive artform that creates meaning and fosters discussion, debate and community.
Theatre, History & Cultures: Analyze and define the central characteristics of the theatrical artform, both generally and in relation to the history of the United States and Global Cultures.
Oral Communication & Writing Skills for the Theatre: Analyze and evaluate the experience and the various components of live theatrical production, and articulate its value both verbally and in writing.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Kingsborough Community College
Author:
Ryan McKinney
Date Added:
06/14/2021