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AAS 267 African American Literature
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A survey course that will take us from the early days of enslavement to the present. We will read, analyze, and discuss literary texts written by African Americans, paying particular attention to the political, historical and social context that informs these texts.
The full course site is available at https://aas267.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Rice, Anne
Date Added:
04/01/2018
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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This CUNY Student Edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is intended to provide a free-to-use, reliable text for students and instructors. It is published under a Creative Commons license which allows almost unlimited free-use. The text is based on the first American edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, published in 1885. CUNY student editions are created and maintained by a community of student-scholars. Join them on GitHub: https://github.com/CUNY-Student-Editions

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Mark Twain
Date Added:
03/28/2019
African-American Literature
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary production of African American authors from the Colonial period to the current day, examining the cultural, historical, and political contexts of the literature, as well as how the issues of gender, race, and class affect the production and meaning of these works. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the cultural influences and the development of African American literature; analyze the evolution of African American literature from an oral to a literary tradition; define the functions of African American literature from its inception in the period of slavery to the contemporary period; identify the major authors and/or literary works in the various literary periods and movements (Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism, and modernism; Black Arts; and the Contemporary Period). This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 411)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
African American Literature
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

AAS 267, African American Literature, is a survey course that will take us from the early days of enslavement to the present. We will read, analyze, and discuss literary texts written by African Americans, paying particular attention to the political, historical and social context that informs these texts.

Subject:
Literature
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Anne Rice
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Afro-Brazilian Music and Culture
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In this course students will learn about the musical heritage Africans brought to Brazil and how through forced conversion and cultural adaptation, their traditions quickly syncretized into distinct Afro-Brazilian artistic expressions. This course will explore many musical traditions, including; Samba, Pagode, Baile Funk, Candombl̩ and Ax̩ music for their social, religious and/or political significance, from the early twentieth century through today. In doing so, students will get to practice and learn the vocabulary and grammatical structures found in the music of these rich and varied genres, and acquire a familiarity with conversational Portuguese.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Castro McGowan, Regina
Date Added:
04/01/2020
Algorithms for Computer Animation, Fall 2002
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In-depth study of an active research topic in computer graphics. Topics change each term. Readings from the literature, student presentations, short assignments, and a programming project. Animation is a compelling and effective form of expression; it engages viewers and makes difficult concepts easier to grasp. Today's animation industry creates films, special effects, and games with stunning visual detail and quality. This graduate class will investigate the algorithms that make these animations possible: keyframing, inverse kinematics, physical simulation, optimization, optimal control, motion capture, and data-driven methods. Our study will also reveal the shortcomings of these sophisticated tools. The students will propose improvements and explore new methods for computer animation in semester-long research projects. The course should appeal to both students with general interest in computer graphics and students interested in new applications of machine learning, robotics, biomechanics, physics, applied mathematics and scientific computing.

Subject:
Computer Science
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Popovic, Jovan
Date Added:
01/01/2002
All's Well That Ends Well
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CC BY-NC
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The Folger Shakespeare Library provides the full searchable text of "All's Well That Ends Well" to read online or download as a PDF. All of the lines are numbered sequentially to make it easier and more convenient to find any line.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
William Shakespeare
Date Added:
10/23/2018
American Authors: American Women Authors, Spring 2003
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Examines in detail the works of several American authors. Through close readings of poetry, novels, or plays, subject addresses such issues as literary influence, cultural diversity, and the writer's career. Topic: American Women Authors. This subject, crosslisted in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and inclass reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate. A classroom electronic archive has been developed for this course and will be available as a resource for images and other media materials.

Subject:
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley
Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2003
American Classics, Spring 2006
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An examination of "classic" documents in American history from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, including writings by authors such as John Winthrop, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison; Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, and Abraham Lincoln; Horatio Alger, Jacob Riis and Thorstein Veblen; Franklin D. Roosevelt, Betty Friedan, Bob Dylan, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Music, taped speeches, television programs, motion pictures, and/or other visual materials may also be included. Class meetings consist primarily of discussions and there is one required museum trip.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2006
American Indian Stories
Read the Fine Print
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This collection of stories was written by Dakota Sioux author Zitkala-Sa, also known as Gertrude Bonnin. Helen Keller sent a testimonial letter to the author on August 25, 1919: "I thank you for your book on Indian legends. I have read them with exquisite pleasure. Like all folk tales they mirror the child life of the world. There is in them a note of wild, strange music." The text here presented was published in 1921 by Hayworth Publishing in Washington, D.C.

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Zitkala-Sa aka Gertrude Bonnin
Date Added:
10/22/2019
American Literature I
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Rating

This course is a survey of American Literature from 1650 through 1820. It covers Early American and Puritan Literature, Enlightenment Literature, and Romantic Literature. It teaches in the context of American History and introduces the student to literary criticism and research.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
03/06/2019
American Literature I (ENGL 246)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
03/06/2019
American Literature, Spring 2013
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger, Spring 2013
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This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wyn Kelley
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Renaissance
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_American Renaissance,ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the periodĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discriminate among the key economic, technological, social, and cultural transformations underpinning the American Renaissance; define the transformations in American Protestantism exemplified by the second Great Awakening and transcendentalism; list the key tenets of transcendentalism and relate them to romanticism more broadly and to social and cultural developments in the antebellum United States; analyze EmersonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s place in defining transcendentalism and his key differences from other transcendentalists; analyze competing conceptualizations of poetry and its construction and purpose, with particular attention to Poe, Emerson, and Whitman; define the formal innovations of Dickinson and their relationship to her central themes; describe the emergence of the short story as a form, with reference to specific stories by Hawthorne and Poe; distinguish among forms of the novel, with reference to specific works by Hawthorne, Thompson, and Fern; analyze the ways that writers such as Melville, Brownson, Davis, and Thoreau saw industrialization and capitalism as a threat to U. S. society; develop the relationship between ThoreauĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s interest in nature and his political commitments and compare and contrast his thinking with Emerson and other transcendentalists; analyze the different ways that sentimentalism constrained and empowered women writers to critique gender conventions, with reference to specific works by writers such as Fern, Alcott, and Stowe; define the ways that the slavery question influenced major texts and major controversies over literature during this period. This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 405)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Animal-human Vocabulary Builder
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The assignment helps students individually build a usable, expanding vocabulary of terms and concepts, enabling each to further contribute to the ongoing, evolving written, oral, and visual conversations centered on the use of and thought about animals for food, clothing, work, entertainment, experimentation, imagery, and companionship.

Subject:
Environmental Studies
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Social Science
Anthropology
Psychology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Acocella, Domenick
Cordero, Rene
Date Added:
01/01/2021
Annotated Bibliography Assignment for English 201
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This assignment will help students of English Composition II to construct an annotated bibliography as a precursor to a research paper.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
DeKlein, Elida
Date Added:
08/01/2018
Antillean Literature - Comparative Literature in the Spanish Antilles, Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course will cover literature from Spanish Antilles and will be conducted in English. We will include a study of foundational texts in translation, from the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as contemporary works by Cuban, Dominican, and Puerto Rican authors.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Romo-Carmona, Mariana
Date Added:
10/01/2019
Antología Abierta De Literatura Hispana
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Una antología crítica de textos literarios del mundo hispanohablante. Se enfoca en autores canónicos y también se intenta incluir voces marginadas. Cada texto tiene una introducción y anotaciones creadas por estudiantes.

A critical anthology of literary texts from the Spanish-speaking world. A focus on canonical authors and an attempt to include voices that have been marginalized. Each text includes an introduction and annotations created by students.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Julie Ward
Date Added:
01/01/2017