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Ethics, Fall 2009
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This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Markovits, Julia
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Ethics and Moral Issues Oral Inquiry and Problem Solving Research Project: Oral Presentation (Step 3) [Philosophy]
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This Ethics and Moral Issues (HUP 104) assignment incorporates the main elements of the rubrics for both Inquiry and Problem Solving (IPS) Core Competency as well as the Oral Communication Ability. It deposits Capstone Oral/IPS. The emphasis on the organization of the student‰Ûªs speech, evaluation of research that represents diverse points of view on the problem chosen, and emphasis on building an argument from true premises to well-supported conclusions all speak to the IPS rubric. The emphasis on communicating clearly the stakes of the problem and the student‰Ûªs solutions, the credibility and diversity of the research sources, as well as the nuances of attention to audience, body language, and voice all speak to the Oral Communication Ability rubric. The students typically come from many Liberal Arts majors, with at least one or two from Philosophy. They are typically second-semester or second-year students who are more advanced than incoming Freshmen. This assignment is staged across the semester. We build up to this step about ten weeks into the semester and actively work on it for about two weeks prior to the presentations, which take a week of class to produce. This assignment is worth 10% of the final grade. It was revised during the 2017-2018 Learning Matters Mini-Grant process, where the Philosophy Team, with help from Professor Patricia Sokolski, assessed artifacts from a previous version of the assignment and determined that the students‰Ûª attention to audience, active listening, and incorporation of research were the weakest points. All of this has been revised at the rubric-level as well as in the classroom work leading up to the presentation.
LaGuardia‰Ûªs Core Competencies and Communication Abilities

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
LaGuardia Community College
Author:
Carr, Cheri
Date Added:
07/01/2018
Ethics and Public Policy
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This course will provide the student with an overview of the role that ethical, cultural, religious, and moral principles play in public policy. The course will introduce the student to common themes found in the foundational theories of ethics and morality in politics such as justice, equality, fairness, individual liberty, free enterprise, charity, fundamental human rights, and minimizing harm to others. These themes are integrated into various decision-making models that you will learn about. Students will examine five types of decision frameworks used to make and implement public policy, as well as rationales used to justify inequitable impact and outcomes of policies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how personal morality and ethics impact the policymaking process; discuss various ethical frameworks used to resolve policy dilemmas; identify statutes, ethical codes, and legal opinions that define the normative parameters of key domestic and international policy issues; assess the impact that public interest groups have on policymaking and execution of policies. (Political Science 401)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
European Thought and Culture, Spring 2008
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This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Nolden, Tom
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Existentialism
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This course will examine the main focus that unites existentialists, "existence." Particularly, it will examine the concrete existence of individual human beings. Major figures or study will be, Blaise Pascal, Sóren Kierkegaard, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Albert Camus.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Feeling and Imagination in Art, Science, and Technology, Spring 2004
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Seminar on the creativity in art, science, and technology. Discussion of how these pursuits are jointly dependent on affective as well as cognitive elements in human nature. Feeling and imagination studied in relation to principles of idealization, consummation, and the aesthetic values that give meaning to science and technology as well as literature and the other arts. Readings in philosophy, psychology, and literature.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Singer Irving
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Film as Visual and Literary Mythmaking, Fall 2005
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This course examines problems in the philosophy of film as well as literature studied in relation to their making of myths. The readings and films that are discussed in this course draw upon classic myths of the western world. Emphasis is placed on meaning and technique as the basis of creative value in both media.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Singer, Irving
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Foundations of Cognition, Spring 2003
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Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project is required for graduate credit.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Linguistics
Philosophy
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Boroditsky, Lera
Tenenbaum, Joshua
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Foundations of Western Culture:  Homer to Dante, Fall 2008
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" As we read broadly from throughout the vast chronological period that is "Homer to Dante," we will pepper our readings of individual ancient and medieval texts with broader questions like: what images, themes, and philosophical questions recur through the period; are there distinctly "classical" or "medieval" ways of depicting or addressing them; and what do terms like "Antiquity" or "the Middle Ages" even mean? (What are the Middle Ages in the "middle" of, for example?) Our texts will include adventure tales of travel and self-discovery (Homer's Odyssey and Dante's Inferno); courtroom dramas of vengeance and reconciliation (Aeschylus's Oresteia and the Icelandic NjĚÁls saga); short poems of love and transformation (Ovid's Metamorphoses and the Lais of Marie de France); and epics of war, nation-construction, and empire (Homer's Iliad, Virgil's Aeneid, and the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf)."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bahr, Arthur
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Foundations of Western Culture II: Renaissance to Modernity, Spring 2003
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This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about the nature of mankind's ethical and political life in the West since the renaissance It will deal with the change in perspective imposed by scientific ideas, the general loss of a supernatural or religious perspective upon human events, and the effects for good or ill of the increasing authority of an intelligence uninformed by religion as a guide to life. The readings are roughly complementary to the readings in 21L001, and classroom discussion will stress appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the cultural heritage of the modern world.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kibel, Alvin C.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Foundations of World Culture I: World Civilizations and Texts, Fall 2011
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This course aims to introduce students to the rich diversity of human culture from antiquity to the early 17th century. In this course, we will explore human culture in its myriad expressions, focusing on the study of literary, religious and philosophical texts as ways of narrating, symbolizing, and commenting on all aspects of human social and material life. We will work comparatively, reading texts from various cultures: Mesopotamian, Greek, Judeo-Christian, Chinese, Indian, and Muslim. Throughout the semester, we will be asking questions like: How have different cultures imagined themselves? What are the rules that they draw up for human behavior? How do they represent the role of the individual in society? How do they imagine 'universal' concepts like love, family, duty? How have their writers and artists dealt with encounters with other cultures and other civilizations?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ghenwa Hayek
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Fundamental Methods of Logic
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Fundamental Methods of Logic is suitable for a one-semester introduction to logic/critical reasoning course. It covers a variety of topics at an introductory level. Chapter One introduces basic notions, such as arguments and explanations, validity and soundness, deductive and inductive reasoning; it also covers basic analytical techniques, such as distinguishing premises from conclusions and diagramming arguments. Chapter Two discusses informal logical fallacies. Chapters Three and Four concern deductive logic, introducing the basics of Aristotelian and Sentential Logic, respectively. Chapter Five deals with analogical and causal reasoning, including a discussion of Mill's Methods. Chapter Six covers basic probability calculations, Bayesian inference, fundamental statistical concepts and techniques, and common statistical fallacies.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Author:
Matthew Knachel
Date Added:
09/08/2017
General Philosophy Lectures
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A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. Taking a chronological view of the history of philosophy, each lecture is split into 3 or 4 sections which outline a particular philosophical problem and how different philosophers have attempted to resolve the issue. Individuals interested in the 'big' questions about life such as how we perceive the world, who we are in the world and whether we are free to act will find this series informative, comprehensive and accessible.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Peter Millican
Date Added:
02/19/2010
Global Social Theory
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This course is designed as an introduction to the key questions and concepts of the Social Sciences. It aims at exposing students to a conceptual repertoire that prepares the ground for them to develop critical responses to pressing global issues. To this end, its itinerary engages with a variety of texts that comprise global social theory. A main focus of the course is to train students to read these texts carefully with an eye toward using them to analyze the world around us. In pursuing this goal, we ask: what does it mean to understand humans as thoroughly social, cultural, and historical creatures? How do humans create, maintain, and transform their social worlds? How are forms of social difference (race, class, ethnicity, language, citizenship, gender, sexuality, etc.) produced and how do they shape our experiences? In what sense is the contemporary world shaped by particular pasts? What historical transformations lie on the horizon?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Suarez, Dora
Date Added:
10/01/2021
History and Philosophy of Mechanics: Newton's Principia Mathematica, Fall 2011
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This course focuses on an in-depth reading of Principia Mathematica Philosophiae Naturalis by Isaac Newton, as well as several related commentaries and historical philosophical texts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Calculus
Mathematics
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Adam Schulman
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The History of MIT, Spring 2011
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This course examines the history of MIT through the lens of the broader history of science and technology, and vice versa. The course covers the founding of MIT in 1861 and goes through the present, including such topics as William Barton Rogers, educational philosophy, biographies of MIT students and professors, intellectual and organizational development, the role of science, changing laboratories and practices, and MIT's relationship with Boston, the federal government, and industry. Assignments include short papers, presentations, and final paper. A number of classes are concurrent with the MIT150 Symposia.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Higher Education
History
Philosophy
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mindell, David
Smith, Merritt Roe
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Intelligent Troglodyte's Guide to Plato's Republic
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The Republic of Plato is one of the classic gateway texts into the study and practice of philosophy, and it is just the sort of book that has been able to arrest and redirect lives. How it has been able to do this, and whether or not it will be able to do this in your own case, is something you can only discover for yourself. The present guidebook aims to help a person get fairly deep, fairly quickly, into the project. It divides the dialogue into 96 sections and provides commentary on each section as well as questions for reflection and exploration. It is organized with a table of contents and is stitched together with a system of navigating bookmarks. Links to external sites such as the Perseus Classical Library are used throughout. This book is suitable for college courses or independent study.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Reading
Student Guide
Textbook
Provider:
Fort Hays State University
Provider Set:
FHSU Scholars Repository
Author:
Douglas Drabkin
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Interdisciplinary Health Care Ethics
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Welcome to Interdisciplinary Health Care Ethics (PHIL 2203ID). Here you will find a sample syllabus with links to course readings.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
D. Robert McDougall
Date Added:
10/18/2019
Introduction to Biomedical Ethics
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This course introduces students to issues in the field of biomedical ethics, the theoretical tools bioethicists use to analyze them, and methodology for resolving clinical ethical dilemmas.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Arts and Humanities
Life Science
Philosophy
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Mendis, Katherine
Date Added:
08/12/2019