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AAS 232 African Civilizations
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Exploration of the development of African civilizations from the origin of humankind to the present day. Their contributions to the development of the continent and the major world civilizations. The course carries us through Africa‰Ûªs major civilizations clusters, and offers a comparative survey extending from the Nile Valley Civilizations, through the Niger River Civilizations, to the Bantu cluster comprising the Central, Southern and Swahili Civilizations. Particular attention is paid to religious and philosophical beliefs, literature and the arts, social and political organization, economic, scientific, and technological developments. Also highlighted are contributions of African women in the history and development of civilization, as well as contributions of Africa and Africans to the World.
The full course site is available at https://aas232.commons.gc.cuny.edu

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Ngo-Ngijol Banoum, Bertrade
Date Added:
10/01/2019
AAS 267 African American Literature
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A survey course that will take us from the early days of enslavement to the present. We will read, analyze, and discuss literary texts written by African Americans, paying particular attention to the political, historical and social context that informs these texts.
The full course site is available at https://aas267.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Rice, Anne
Date Added:
04/01/2018
ANTH 2140: Anthropology of Food
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As organisms, humans need to eat to live. As cultural beings, eating and food provide some of the most basic ways in which humans define themselves. One group’s delicacies are another’s taboos, and what defines comfort foods and favorite dishes shifts drastically across cultures and individuals. Eating and food are simultaneously profoundly personal, deeply cultural, inherently economic, and increasingly political. This course is organized around the production, circulation, and consumption of food, and the political and economic effects of those processes. Students will learn to use food as an analytical entry point for thinking about relationships among humans and with non-human beings.

Subject:
Agriculture
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Colin Pitet
Date Added:
03/08/2021
ANTH 3420 Urban Archaeology OER
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About Urban Archaeology
Archaeology is undoubtedly most famous for its exploration and discovery of “wonderful things” from the deep past in “exotic” places: Tutankhamun’s tomb! Lost Maya cities! Archaeologists are also keen sift through and ask questions of ancient garbage: What do these tools at Stonehenge suggest about Neolithic and Bronze Age social networks? These discoveries and questions are important for understanding where we came from. However, more and more archaeologists are turning their attention, their theory, and their methods to the recent past and contemporary worlds. This course explores a body of work that advances these efforts in American urban places and considers debates that make the more recent American urban world its object. The course then asks students to assess and evaluate various aspects of American urban life through exposure to a broad range of archaeological case studies.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Kelly Britt
Paul L Hebert
Date Added:
03/15/2021
ARH 141 Introduction to the History of Modern Art
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A study of the principles of art applied to visual forms, with emphasis on modern art of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Europe and the United States.
The full course site is available at https://arh141.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Jordan, Sharon L
Date Added:
04/01/2018
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Simon 2019)
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Introduce students to major works of art from cultures around the world, spanning ancient to modern periods. We will focus on developing skills of formal analysis by closely studying works of painting, sculpture, and architecture. We will also discuss the objects chosen in their historical, political, sociological, and religious contexts in order to better understand their meaning and significance.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 3066: MODERN ART
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This course will examine the art of the first half of the twentieth century. We will consider the works studies within their relevant political and cultural contexts. Topics addressed will include the rise of abstraction, the liberation of color, the interest in the subconscious. We will begin with precedents to Modernism in the 19th Century and will conclude with WWII. Additionally, students will learn methods of art historical research and develop skills of visual analysis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
06/18/2020
ART 7184G Museum Education
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Entails exploration of a variety of methodological approaches to object-based learning within a museum setting. Our goal is the achievement of a comprehensive understanding of methods in museum education.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Chris Richards
Date Added:
03/10/2021
Advanced Spanish Composition
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¡Hola! Welcome to SPN 117 Advanced Spanish Composition, also listed as “Writing intensive”. In this page you will find everything related to our class: syllabus, readings, assignments, bios (about us, as writers!), other resources, and calendar.

We will explore, learn and practice several modes of writing with the aim of producing texts of autobiography in Spanish. Why autobiography? Because we all have a story to tell and especially you: Why are you taking this advanced writing class in Spanish? Why do you speak Spanish? That is a story that deserves to be told! This class is designed to help students sharpen their tools in Spanish with personal expression. How is your family history? How was the journey that brought you here?
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¡Hola! Bienvenidas a SPN 117, Advanced Spanish Composition, también conocida como “Writing intensive”. En esta página encontrarás todo lo relacionado a nuestra clase: el syllabus, las lecturas, las tareas, las biografías (¡nuestras, como escritoras!), así como otros recursos y el calendario.

Exploraremos, aprenderemos y practicaremos varios tipos de escritura con el objetivo de escribir autobiografía en español. ¿Por qué la autobiografía? Porque todas tenemos una historia qué contar y especialmente, tú: ¿por qué estás tomando esta clase de escritura avanzada en español? ¿Por qué hablas español? Esa es una historia que amerita ser contada. Esta clase está diseñada para ayudar a las estudiantes a agudizar sus herramientas de la lengua desde la expresión personal. ¿Cómo es la historia de tu familia? ¿Cómo fue el viaje que te trajo hasta aquí?

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Bronx Community College
Author:
Natasha Tiniacos
Date Added:
06/14/2021
American Identities: AMST 1010
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This course is an introduction to American Studies through the questions of identity. How are our identities formed and how do they function? What does it mean to be “American,” who claims this identity, and on what terms? How do American identities shape—and how are they shaped by—factors such as class, race, ethnicity, gender, language, nation, and sexuality?

This semester, we will examine diverse American identities, with an emphasis on the social and cultural forces that mold them. We will explore the structural differences that divide individuals and groups, and ways that people challenge or transcend these divisions. This interdisciplinary course integrates materials from literary studies, history, ethnic and gender studies, and sociology. We will read some academic theories about identity, but will more often read what a wide range of Americans have written about their own individual and collective identities.

The aim is to help you better understand your own and other people’s identities, the languages and conventions that writers use to analyze identities, and how varied perspectives on identity in the United States and the Americas speak to—and at times against—one another. Rather than settle on a final definition of either “America” or “identity,” we will explore both as products of on-going dialogue, debate, and change.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Conor Tomas Reed
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/15/2021
The American Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives
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This OER (open educational resource) is to act as an ongoing resource for those full and part-time faculty teaching Brooklyn College’s Anthropology Course, ANTH 3135 — The US Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives. This is a living document, which came out of discussions among instructors teaching this course and will continue to grow as we continue to meet each semester to discuss the course.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Meghan Ference
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Astronomy 141
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Welcome to Astronomy 141. Through this course you’ll have an understanding of the sky, Earth, Moon and the Sun, the solar system and the universe. This laboratory course introduces the fundamentals of astronomy such as: the apparent motion of the sky, Sun, Moon and planets; the nature of light; gravity; the properties of planets; the life cycles of stars; and the structure of the universe. Laboratory and computer exercises will be used, and we will conduct one nighttime lab.

As the learning outcomes, students who succeed in this course may eventually respond to:

How does the process of science work, and how does that process manifest itself in astronomy?
How is astronomy of practical use? How has astronomy impacted our understanding of our world?
What is a planet, and how are planets similar to—and different from—one another?
What is the interior of the Earth like, and how do we know?
What is a star? How are the stars similar to and different from one another?
How did the universe get started? What is likely to happen to the universe in the distant future?
[This project was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship at the Mina Rees Library, The Graduate Center].

Read more about the course design here: https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2020/10/19/inclusive-education-and-research-for-astronomy/

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Yuzhe Song
Date Added:
06/24/2021
BIOL 4001: Field Botany
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Since we live in an urban environment with many trees, shrubs, and flower plantings this course is designed so that each student will always be able to walk down the street and have some familiarity with their environs. To that end, each student will learn to identify approximately 50-60 trees and shrubs and know them by their common name, scientific name and family, as well as some annuals and perennials commonly used as bedding plants. Students will learn some basic the botanical concepts, which are used in, plant identification, such as botanical structural features used in phylogeny and taxonomy of plants. In addition to this, students will get an overview of the ecological and economic aspects specific to urban botany.

Subject:
Botany
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Student Guide
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Anna Petrovicheva
Date Added:
06/02/2021
Comparative Studies in Cultures and Transformation
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This course will be a thematic exploration of culture and transformation in two distinct non-US and non-European areas. We will discuss the meanings of culture and ways cultures are studied and portrayed. We will explore the major drivers for cultural change in the modern world such as colonization, modernization, development, and globalization. We will use two case studies to examine important themes related to cultural transformation such as gender, race and ethnic relations, religion, nationalism, power relations, cultural encounter, and constructions of tradition and modernity.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Jessica Santos-López
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Contemporary Spanish Literature in Translation
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Contemporary Spanish Literature in Translation (SPAN264) will examine, in English, major Spanish authors, literary periods and artistic trends through narrative, poetic, dramatic and visual filmic cultural artifacts produced from 1936-1940 to the present day while learning about the historical, political and cultural contexts that surround them.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Analyze and formally interpret the assigned texts, visual and filmic artifacts.
Examine and reflect critically upon the cultural values and ideas conveyed by them.
Become familiar with basic cultural, social and political aspects of contemporary Spanish history.
Demonstrate knowledge of the themes, problems and ideas that appear in the texts.
Learn some key concepts, including literary and rhetorical terminology, for the analysis of contemporary literature and cultural production.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Cristina Pardo Porto
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Criminology
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This course aims to develop a sociological frame to describe and analyze the nature, function, and causes of “crime” and legal institutions in our society. The class begins with a broad overview of criminology as a field and some of the major classic and contemporary theories. The second part of the course reviews empirical works which illustrate, explore, and/or critique these theories. The final part of the course builds on Part 2 and reviews three recent topics of interest in modern criminology.

At the end of the course, you will be able to:
Describe, discuss, and critique arguments about how our society defines crime, why crime occurs, and how our society reacts to and controls behavior deemed “criminal”
Apply criminological theories to social problems of interest
Understand, critique, and/or apply reform and abolitionist frameworks to current key topics related to the nature and role of our criminal legal system

This course was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship, through the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center, CUNY.
Read more about the process of course design here: Criminology - A Critical and Open Approach
https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2021/03/19/criminology-a-critical-and-open-approach/

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Angela LaScala-Gruenewald
Date Added:
06/15/2021
A Critical Approach to Performance History
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World Theatre I is meant to provide a historical survey of performance practices across the globe covering early theatrical forms until broadly the 15th century and traveling through performance traditions in Africa, Western Europe, Asia, and the Americas. This course provides a historical survey of theatre across the globe, covering early theatrical forms until the 15th Century. Through traditions in Africa, Western Europe, Asia, and the Americas, we will examine a variety of theatre forms and styles, as well as individual plays, playwrights, and designers. We will study theoretical texts on theatre and performance from the periods and locales covered. We will also consider the influences on theatre from different cultural, social, political, and economic contexts, and the manners in which theatre has engaged critically and politically in different societies.

We’ll read scripts, theatre/performance theory, and look at some primary sources. All the materials for the class will be housed on this website, including our syllabus, videos from the series Theater CrashCourse, podcasts on Theatre History @Howlround Commons, Library Research Guides (Tools), and other Open Educational Resources. This site is also a work-in-progress platform for rethinking our class’s contents. It will host thoughts and open-access resources to question, research, and practice performance history. [This site was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship, hosted by the Mina Rees Library, The Graduate Center, CUNY].

Subject:
Performing Arts
History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Alex Viteri Arturo
Date Added:
06/24/2021
DFN 220 Ethnic and Therapeutic Meal Patterns
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An in-depth exploration of foods and foodways of diverse populations and cultures. Examination of the effect of ethnic, geographic, ecological and historical factors on foods, foodways, health and diet related diseases.
The full course site is available at https://culturalfoods.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Nutrition
Social Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Burt, Katherine
Date Added:
04/01/2018
Dante's Works
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This website was created by Julie Van Peteghem (Hunter College) for the course ITAL 37001 Prose Works of Dante with the support of a CUNY Academic Commons OER Faculty Teaching Fellowship during the Spring 2018 semester. A work-in-progress, the site provides the English translations of Dante’s Vita nuova, De vulgari eloquentia, Convivio, De monarchia, and the letters at zero cost, and other OER materials related to Dante’s works and world, including some created by the ITAL 37001 students. Unless otherwise indicated, the entries are written by Julie Van Peteghem.

Subject:
Languages
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hunter College
Author:
Julie Van Peteghem
Date Added:
12/10/2018