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  • Queens College
Food as Philosophy, System, Controversy
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CC BY-NC
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Everyone eats. In this sense, the experience of food is common to us all. Yet the meanings we attach to food—as individuals with complex personal histories and needs, as members of particular cultures, communities, and belief systems—are remarkably diverse and powerful. In this course, we engage works by scholars, poets, and other writers to explore the significance of food as the source of inspiration and debate. This exploration will serve as a basis for our own writing. Our written responses will explore food as it relates to identity, social justice, and the environment—showing how far inquiry into one topic can stretch.

Course: ENG 110: Food as Philosophy, System, Controversy
Instructor: Nicole Cote
This project was first developed during the Open Pedagogy Fellowship (Winter 2021), through the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center.

Read more about this project: Cultivating Resources for the Future by Nicole Cote
https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2021/04/22/cultivating-resources-for-the-future/

Subject:
Literature
Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Queens College
Author:
Nicole Cote
Date Added:
05/10/2021
Literature and Place - New York City: 1880-1930
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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COURSE GOALS

Develop an appreciation for literature and its analysis as part of encountering and understanding the world and its regions in a cultural and historical context;
Develop close reading skills to interpret literary texts across different genres;
Develop familiarity with some conventional disciplinary language and its use to think about how texts work (for example, assessing literary works in terms of voice, tone, and structure);
Understand how context works with ideas to produce the meaning of a text;
Use both informal and formal writing as opportunities to discover one’s own ideas in conversation with the ideas of others;
Write a thoughtful, analytical and coherent essay that is firmly grounded in the text and adheres to MLA guidelines.

Subject:
Literature
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Primary Source
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Queens College
Author:
Stefano Morello
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Multimodal Writing – in the standards-based ELA classroom
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this course, we examine contemporary discourse and practice around writing instruction in the secondary English Language Arts (ELA) classroom. School-based composition is often framed and assessed as a specific set of discrete skills that can be developed through decontextualized “best practices.” We will interrogate the assumptions about writing and literacy that sustain these practices and contextualize them within larger (settler) colonial projects. Ultimately, we will develop our own writing philosophies and associated curricular innovations and pedagogical moves.

Specifically, throughout this course, we will:

Review the social, historical, and political contexts that shape contemporary approaches to standards-based writing instruction
Investigate our assumptions about the writing process and our conceptions of “good” writing
Explore the challenges, tensions, and possibilities of a decolonial educational framework
Develop a range of creative, collaborative, and nontraditional approaches to standards-based writing instruction

Read more about the course design:
Mina Rees Library | Drafting Possible Futures
https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2020/05/06/oer-drafting-possible-futures/

See also: Drafting Possible Futures: An Open-Access Handbook for English Educators
Link: https://764handbook.commons.gc.cuny.edu/
This website was collaboratively created by students enrolled in Multimodal Writing in the Standards-Based ELA Classroom. Students wrote the introduction and all chapters, and two student editors reviewed all pieces and created the website design. The result is a document that can be used by any ELA teachers as well as future English Education students.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Language Education (ESL)
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Queens College
Author:
Karen Zaino
Date Added:
06/14/2021