Search Resources

406 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Reading
ANTH 2140: Anthropology of Food
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

As organisms, humans need to eat to live. As cultural beings, eating and food provide some of the most basic ways in which humans define themselves. One group’s delicacies are another’s taboos, and what defines comfort foods and favorite dishes shifts drastically across cultures and individuals. Eating and food are simultaneously profoundly personal, deeply cultural, inherently economic, and increasingly political. This course is organized around the production, circulation, and consumption of food, and the political and economic effects of those processes. Students will learn to use food as an analytical entry point for thinking about relationships among humans and with non-human beings.

Subject:
Agriculture
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Colin Pitet
Date Added:
03/08/2021
ANTH 3135: Home The American Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course engages students in the diversity of American urban life and introduces various modes of analyzing socio-cultural scenes, communities, and urban institutions. In the first part of the course, we will lay the foundations for understanding urban processes and communities. We will examine the racial and ethnic diversity in cities and the ways people understand and cope with being in an environment filled with "strangers". We will develop an understanding of urban political economy and the effects of inequality and economic strain on urban life. In the second part of the course, we will focus on the effects of globalization, post-industrial decline, and post-modernism on cities. In this section, we will focus on the production and consumption of urban spaces. We will look at the ways American cities have developed and changed as well as the competing views and political contestations behind these transformations.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Reference
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Christa Paterline
Date Added:
09/03/2021
ANTH 3360: Language Loss: Culture, Politics and Self
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

Libguide OER for Prof. Jill Cavanaugh's course: ANTH 3360: Language Loss: Culture, Politics and Self. What does it mean to lose or risk losing your language? What is the value of language, to speakers, to experts like anthropologists, to humanity more broadly? This course explores answers to these questions through thinking about language as a cultural practice and object, a political activity and topic, and something that is deeply entwined with speakers’ senses of self. We will consider case studies from the US immigrant experience as well as cases of language endangerment and loss around the globe. To analyze these issues more immediately, students will do a research project about a language in Brooklyn, which will involve mapping ethnographic research, photographic, interviews, and other evidence to tell a story about a particular language’s current vitality

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Jill Cavanaugh
Date Added:
12/08/2020
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Bleeke)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Examine the history of visual art across world cultures from the fourth millennium BCE to the twentieth century CE. Starting with the early civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia, we will explore the ways in which art has shaped, and been shaped by,the development of empires, cities, religions, politics, and social life through history. Our focus will be on major monuments and artworks that are exemplary of their time and place, but we will also look at lesser known objects to nuance and deepen our historical understanding. Classes will be primarily lecture-based, with time for discussion and questions as we explore the issues raised by both the artworks and the required readings.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Jeremy Bleeke
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Carroll)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

An introduction to the history of art, emphasizing visual literacy in an historical context. Major works of art and architecture, drawn from a wide range of world cultures and periods from ancient times to the present, will be explored.

Students will learn to analyze works of art critically from both an historical and an interpretative point of view; in addition, they will gain an understanding of the importance of cultural diversity through exposure to the arts of many different times and places.
Students will have extensive practice in articulating aesthetic judgments effectively in spoken and written form.
Students will learn how to draw upon the cultural riches of New York City to enhance their learning within and outside the classroom.
Identify unique characteristics of several artistic traditions, and recognize and analyze the differences among the major periods, artists, genres, and theories of art.
Use terms of art historical analysis correctly and be able to apply them to unfamiliar works.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Reading
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Anna Carroll
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Fabris)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

What is art? Why is it created? What is its meaning? These are some of the questions we will ponder in this class. This course serves as an introduction to art, with an emphasis on visual literacy and historical context. We will explore major works of art and architecture, drawn from a wide range of world cultures and periods, from ancient times to the present.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Rita Fabris
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Greenberg)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

An introduction to the study of art and its history from ancient times to the present. In this course, we will study the history of Western art, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of contemporary times.

The information presented in this course will provide you with the tools to recognize important works of art and historical styles, as well as to understand the historical context and cultural developments of Western art history through the end of the modern period. Introductory readings paired with detailed lectures will provide you with a well-rounded sense of the history, art, and culture of the West up through modern times.

At the end of this course, you will be able to identify key works of art and artistic periods in Western history. You will also be able to discuss the development of stylistic movements and relate those developments to important historical events.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Natalie Greenberg
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (McCreight)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Introductory course offers various windows into the development of human expression through the arts, spanning prehistory to the 21st century. Using art from diverse cultures and time periods, we will explore the way that art functions within broader societal trends and ideas, both reacting to and influencing major historical moments. Students will become comfortable with speaking and writing about specific art-historical styles, issues and key terms, and be able to approach art in both a formal/visual and historic context. They will also learn how to navigate and explore their own specific interests within the history of art and become aware of resources that will guide them to further complexify their own research and writing.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Maura McCreight
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Simon 2019)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Introduce students to major works of art from cultures around the world, spanning ancient to modern periods. We will focus on developing skills of formal analysis by closely studying works of painting, sculpture, and architecture. We will also discuss the objects chosen in their historical, political, sociological, and religious contexts in order to better understand their meaning and significance.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Smilow)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

What is art? Why does it matter? This course presents a general global view of art history through slide lectures, class discussions, video resources and a museum visit. It selectively surveys the visual arts, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of today, covering concurrent historical periods in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

Using art from diverse cultures and time periods, we will explore the way that art functions within broader societal trends and ideas, both reacting to and influencing major historical moments.

You will become comfortable with speaking and writing about specific art historical styles, issues and key terms, and be able to approach art in both a formal/visual and historic context. You will also learn how to navigate and explore your own specific interests within the history of art and become aware of resources that will guide you to further your own academic pursuit

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Reading
Syllabus
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Lindsay Smilow
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 3066: MODERN ART
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course will examine the art of the first half of the twentieth century. We will consider the works studies within their relevant political and cultural contexts. Topics addressed will include the rise of abstraction, the liberation of color, the interest in the subconscious. We will begin with precedents to Modernism in the 19th Century and will conclude with WWII. Additionally, students will learn methods of art historical research and develop skills of visual analysis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Malka Simon
Date Added:
06/18/2020
ART 3094/7024G-Postwar Art: From World War II to 1989
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

Home OER for Mona Hadler's ART3094-Postwar Art: From World War II to 1989. Twentieth-century art from World War II to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Major movements include Abstract Expressionism, Fluxus and performance, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Postmodernism. Major artists include Pollock, Rauschenberg, Hesse, Serra, Richter, Warhol, Sherman. Issues of gender, race and politics are integrated into the entire curriculum. For document passwords, please contact Mona Hadler or the Brooklyn College Library.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Mona Hadler
Date Added:
12/08/2020
ART 3134/7142 Subject, Creator, Consumer: Women and African Art (Richards)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

Chris Richards' course at Brooklyn College offers a thematic examination of African art with an emphasis on the importance of women, a group recognized for their influence on and creation of artistic forms, yet seldom the exclusive focus of academic inquiry. Students will examine a diverse range of visual art forms throughout the African continent, in both historical and contemporary contexts. Although the course is organized thematically, students will be encouraged to interrogate these categories, exploring how specific art forms can fit into multiple categories. The thematic structure will allow students to compare similar art forms from different African cultures, such as pottery and masquerades. Lastly, this course will encourage students to question academic sources for potential biases, particularly in regards to the representation of women.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Chris Richards
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 7184G Museum Education
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Entails exploration of a variety of methodological approaches to object-based learning within a museum setting. Our goal is the achievement of a comprehensive understanding of methods in museum education.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Chris Richards
Date Added:
03/10/2021
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating

This CUNY Student Edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is intended to provide a free-to-use, reliable text for students and instructors. It is published under a Creative Commons license which allows almost unlimited free-use. The text is based on the first American edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, published in 1885. CUNY student editions are created and maintained by a community of student-scholars. Join them on GitHub: https://github.com/CUNY-Student-Editions

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Mark Twain
Date Added:
03/28/2019
All's Well That Ends Well
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The Folger Shakespeare Library provides the full searchable text of "All's Well That Ends Well" to read online or download as a PDF. All of the lines are numbered sequentially to make it easier and more convenient to find any line.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
William Shakespeare
Date Added:
10/23/2018
American Government (POLS 202)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course covers American Government: the Constitution, the branches of government (Presidency, Congress, Judiciary) and how politics works: elections, voting, parties, campaigning, policy making. In addition weęll look at how the media, interest groups, public opinion polls and political self-identification (are you liberal or conservative, Democrat or Republican or something else?) impact politics and political choices. Weęll also cover the basics in economic, social and foreign policy and bring in current issues and show how they illustrate the process.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
03/04/2019
American Indian Stories
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This collection of stories was written by Dakota Sioux author Zitkala-Sa, also known as Gertrude Bonnin. Helen Keller sent a testimonial letter to the author on August 25, 1919: "I thank you for your book on Indian legends. I have read them with exquisite pleasure. Like all folk tales they mirror the child life of the world. There is in them a note of wild, strange music." The text here presented was published in 1921 by Hayworth Publishing in Washington, D.C.

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Zitkala-Sa aka Gertrude Bonnin
Date Added:
10/22/2019
American Literature I (ENGL 246)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
03/06/2019
The American Renaissance
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_American Renaissance,ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the periodĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discriminate among the key economic, technological, social, and cultural transformations underpinning the American Renaissance; define the transformations in American Protestantism exemplified by the second Great Awakening and transcendentalism; list the key tenets of transcendentalism and relate them to romanticism more broadly and to social and cultural developments in the antebellum United States; analyze EmersonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s place in defining transcendentalism and his key differences from other transcendentalists; analyze competing conceptualizations of poetry and its construction and purpose, with particular attention to Poe, Emerson, and Whitman; define the formal innovations of Dickinson and their relationship to her central themes; describe the emergence of the short story as a form, with reference to specific stories by Hawthorne and Poe; distinguish among forms of the novel, with reference to specific works by Hawthorne, Thompson, and Fern; analyze the ways that writers such as Melville, Brownson, Davis, and Thoreau saw industrialization and capitalism as a threat to U. S. society; develop the relationship between ThoreauĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s interest in nature and his political commitments and compare and contrast his thinking with Emerson and other transcendentalists; analyze the different ways that sentimentalism constrained and empowered women writers to critique gender conventions, with reference to specific works by writers such as Fern, Alcott, and Stowe; define the ways that the slavery question influenced major texts and major controversies over literature during this period. This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 405)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
American Sign Language I (ASL 121)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

ASL I is an introduction to the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
03/06/2019
American Sign Language II (ASL 122)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

ASL II is a sequential course following ASL I, which continues to build knowledge of the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to continue to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
03/06/2019
American Sign Language III (ASL 123)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

ASL III is the third quarter of the first year study of American Sign Language (ASL) and the people who use it. ASL III will enhance the use of ASL grammar and consist of concentrated efforts to develop the studentęs expressive and receptive skills. The course will continue to provide insights into Deaf Cultural values, attitudes and the Deaf community. Now learning more abstract concepts of the language, ASL III students will be able to: narrate events that occurred in the past, ask for solutions to everyday problems, tell about life events, and describe objects. Students will also be able to: demonstrate intermediate finger spelling competency, generate complex ASL structures with intermediate vocabulary knowledge, execute a wide variety of grammatical principles, including classifiers and inflections, adapt to different sign language registers, dialects and accents, and create opportunities to interact with members of the Deaf community.

Subject:
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
03/06/2019
The American Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

This OER (open educational resource) is to act as an ongoing resource for those full and part-time faculty teaching Brooklyn College’s Anthropology Course, ANTH 3135 — The US Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives. This is a living document, which came out of discussions among instructors teaching this course and will continue to grow as we continue to meet each semester to discuss the course.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Meghan Ference
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Ancient Medicine: The Classical Roots of the Medical Humanities
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This site is for those interested in ancient medicine and the medical humanities, both at Brooklyn College and around the world. It features open access web resources and other resources available to the City University of New York community. It is committed to the use of Open Educational Resources (OER).

The medical humanities is a multidisciplinary field that embraces the study of medicine through the lenses of literature, history, philosophy, the social sciences, and the arts in the context of applied medicine and bioethics. It draws upon these diverse disciplines in pursuit of medical educational goals, and in its continued valuation of liberal arts education supports the classical ideals of critical analysis and cultural awareness concerning the sickness and health of society and the individual.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Michael Goyette
Date Added:
03/15/2021
Anthropology 1200: Human Origins
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course aims to teach students about the evolutionary history, ecology, and behavior of humans and other primates, while also providing information on a range of topics including the history of evolutionary thought, natural selection, basic genetics, and elementary skeletal anatomy. No prior courses in anthropology or evolutionary biology are required.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Abigail Colby
Colin McDonald
Date Added:
05/14/2021
Antony and Cleopatra
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The Folger Shakespeare Library provides the full searchable text of "As You Like It" to read online or download as a PDF. All of the lines are numbered sequentially to make it easier and more convenient to find any line.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
William Shakespeare
Date Added:
10/23/2018
Art Appreciation and Techniques
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Art Appreciation and Techniques
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. It is the only resource I have found that approximates techniques, media, and an overview of different processes that is usually the first half of a printed text on art appreciation or an introduction to art. This is geared toward an undergraduate, lower-level student population. The art history survey is inadequate, but combined with another source, like Boundless' art history, this can be a complete text for an Art 100 course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Module
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Afshan Bokhari
Amy Gansell
Andrew E. Hershberger
Andrew Marvick
Anne Bertrand-Dewsnap
Denise Rogers
Hilda Werschkul
Jelena Bogdanovic
Jennifer Palinkas
Jill Kiefer
Lynn E. Roller
Marjorie Munsterberg
Michelle Greet
Shaoqian Zhang
Tracy Musacchio
William V. Ganis
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Artificial Intelligence
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course includes materials on AI programming, logic, search, game playing, machine learning, natural language understanding, and robotics, which will introduce the student to AI methods, tools, and techniques, their application to computational problems, and their contribution to understanding intelligence. The material is introductory; the readings cite many resources outside those assigned in this course, and students are encouraged to explore these resources to pursue topics of interest. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Describe the major applications, topics, and research areas of artificial intelligence (AI), including search, machine learning, knowledge representation and inference, natural language processing, vision, and robotics; Apply basic techniques of AI in computational solutions to problems; Discuss the role of AI research areas in growing the understanding of human intelligence; Identify the boundaries of the capabilities of current AI systems. (Computer Science 405)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/07/2019
The Art of Romare Bearden
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The visual narratives and abstractions of this preeminent African American artist explore the places where he lived and worked: the rural South, Pittsburgh, Harlem, and the Caribbean. Bearden's central themesŃreligion, jazz and blues, history, literature, and the realities of black lifeŃendured throughout his remarkable career in watercolors, oils, and especially collages and photomontages from the 1940s through the 1980s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Provider:
National Gallery of Art
Date Added:
03/06/2019
As You Like It
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The Folger Shakespeare Library provides the full searchable text of "All's Well That Ends Well" to read online or download as a PDF. All of the lines are numbered sequentially to make it easier and more convenient to find any line.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
William Shakespeare
Date Added:
10/23/2018
BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Course Pack 6
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course pack is designed to meet the learning outcomes for Adult Literacy Fundamental English Level 6 (roughly equivalent to grades 7.5 to 9 in the K-12 system). Every chapter includes a level-appropriate, high-interest reading of between 500 and 1,000 words. The readings are freely available in a separate reader with convenient links to the readings in each chapter of this course pack. Font size and line spacing can be adjusted in the online view, and have been enhanced for the print and PDF versions for easier reading. This course pack has been reviewed by subject experts from colleges and universities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Shantel Ivits
Date Added:
09/15/2017
BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Reader 2
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This reader, written specifically for adults, contains eight chapters about Langston Hughes' family history and personal life. It includes excerpts from many of Hughes' poems and is designed to accompany the BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Course Pack 2. This level 2 reader, one of a series of six readers, is roughly equivalent to grades 1.5 to 3 in the K-12 system. Font size and line spacing can be adjusted in the online view, and have been enhanced for the print and PDF versions for easier reading. This reader has been reviewed by subject experts from colleges and universities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Shantel Ivits
Date Added:
05/17/2017