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AAS 267 African American Literature
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A survey course that will take us from the early days of enslavement to the present. We will read, analyze, and discuss literary texts written by African Americans, paying particular attention to the political, historical and social context that informs these texts.
The full course site is available at https://aas267.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Rice, Anne
Date Added:
04/01/2018
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
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CC BY-SA
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This CUNY Student Edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is intended to provide a free-to-use, reliable text for students and instructors. It is published under a Creative Commons license which allows almost unlimited free-use. The text is based on the first American edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, published in 1885. CUNY student editions are created and maintained by a community of student-scholars. Join them on GitHub: https://github.com/CUNY-Student-Editions

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Mark Twain
Date Added:
03/28/2019
African-American Literature
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CC BY
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This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary production of African American authors from the Colonial period to the current day, examining the cultural, historical, and political contexts of the literature, as well as how the issues of gender, race, and class affect the production and meaning of these works. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the cultural influences and the development of African American literature; analyze the evolution of African American literature from an oral to a literary tradition; define the functions of African American literature from its inception in the period of slavery to the contemporary period; identify the major authors and/or literary works in the various literary periods and movements (Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism, and modernism; Black Arts; and the Contemporary Period). This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 411)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
African American Literature
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AAS 267, African American Literature, is a survey course that will take us from the early days of enslavement to the present. We will read, analyze, and discuss literary texts written by African Americans, paying particular attention to the political, historical and social context that informs these texts.

Subject:
Literature
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Anne Rice
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Afro-Brazilian Music and Culture
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In this course students will learn about the musical heritage Africans brought to Brazil and how through forced conversion and cultural adaptation, their traditions quickly syncretized into distinct Afro-Brazilian artistic expressions. This course will explore many musical traditions, including; Samba, Pagode, Baile Funk, Candombl̩ and Ax̩ music for their social, religious and/or political significance, from the early twentieth century through today. In doing so, students will get to practice and learn the vocabulary and grammatical structures found in the music of these rich and varied genres, and acquire a familiarity with conversational Portuguese.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Castro McGowan, Regina
Date Added:
04/01/2020
Algorithms for Computer Animation, Fall 2002
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In-depth study of an active research topic in computer graphics. Topics change each term. Readings from the literature, student presentations, short assignments, and a programming project. Animation is a compelling and effective form of expression; it engages viewers and makes difficult concepts easier to grasp. Today's animation industry creates films, special effects, and games with stunning visual detail and quality. This graduate class will investigate the algorithms that make these animations possible: keyframing, inverse kinematics, physical simulation, optimization, optimal control, motion capture, and data-driven methods. Our study will also reveal the shortcomings of these sophisticated tools. The students will propose improvements and explore new methods for computer animation in semester-long research projects. The course should appeal to both students with general interest in computer graphics and students interested in new applications of machine learning, robotics, biomechanics, physics, applied mathematics and scientific computing.

Subject:
Computer Science
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Popovic, Jovan
Date Added:
01/01/2002
All's Well That Ends Well
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CC BY-NC
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The Folger Shakespeare Library provides the full searchable text of "All's Well That Ends Well" to read online or download as a PDF. All of the lines are numbered sequentially to make it easier and more convenient to find any line.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
William Shakespeare
Date Added:
10/23/2018
American Authors: American Women Authors, Spring 2003
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Examines in detail the works of several American authors. Through close readings of poetry, novels, or plays, subject addresses such issues as literary influence, cultural diversity, and the writer's career. Topic: American Women Authors. This subject, crosslisted in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and inclass reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate. A classroom electronic archive has been developed for this course and will be available as a resource for images and other media materials.

Subject:
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley
Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2003
American Classics, Spring 2006
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An examination of "classic" documents in American history from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, including writings by authors such as John Winthrop, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison; Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, and Abraham Lincoln; Horatio Alger, Jacob Riis and Thorstein Veblen; Franklin D. Roosevelt, Betty Friedan, Bob Dylan, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Music, taped speeches, television programs, motion pictures, and/or other visual materials may also be included. Class meetings consist primarily of discussions and there is one required museum trip.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2006
American Indian Stories
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This collection of stories was written by Dakota Sioux author Zitkala-Sa, also known as Gertrude Bonnin. Helen Keller sent a testimonial letter to the author on August 25, 1919: "I thank you for your book on Indian legends. I have read them with exquisite pleasure. Like all folk tales they mirror the child life of the world. There is in them a note of wild, strange music." The text here presented was published in 1921 by Hayworth Publishing in Washington, D.C.

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Zitkala-Sa aka Gertrude Bonnin
Date Added:
10/22/2019
American Literature I
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This course is a survey of American Literature from 1650 through 1820. It covers Early American and Puritan Literature, Enlightenment Literature, and Romantic Literature. It teaches in the context of American History and introduces the student to literary criticism and research.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
03/06/2019
American Literature I (ENGL 246)
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In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
03/06/2019
American Literature, Spring 2013
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This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger, Spring 2013
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This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wyn Kelley
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Renaissance
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The ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_American Renaissance,ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the periodĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discriminate among the key economic, technological, social, and cultural transformations underpinning the American Renaissance; define the transformations in American Protestantism exemplified by the second Great Awakening and transcendentalism; list the key tenets of transcendentalism and relate them to romanticism more broadly and to social and cultural developments in the antebellum United States; analyze EmersonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s place in defining transcendentalism and his key differences from other transcendentalists; analyze competing conceptualizations of poetry and its construction and purpose, with particular attention to Poe, Emerson, and Whitman; define the formal innovations of Dickinson and their relationship to her central themes; describe the emergence of the short story as a form, with reference to specific stories by Hawthorne and Poe; distinguish among forms of the novel, with reference to specific works by Hawthorne, Thompson, and Fern; analyze the ways that writers such as Melville, Brownson, Davis, and Thoreau saw industrialization and capitalism as a threat to U. S. society; develop the relationship between ThoreauĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s interest in nature and his political commitments and compare and contrast his thinking with Emerson and other transcendentalists; analyze the different ways that sentimentalism constrained and empowered women writers to critique gender conventions, with reference to specific works by writers such as Fern, Alcott, and Stowe; define the ways that the slavery question influenced major texts and major controversies over literature during this period. This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 405)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Animal-human Vocabulary Builder
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The assignment helps students individually build a usable, expanding vocabulary of terms and concepts, enabling each to further contribute to the ongoing, evolving written, oral, and visual conversations centered on the use of and thought about animals for food, clothing, work, entertainment, experimentation, imagery, and companionship.

Subject:
Environmental Studies
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Social Science
Anthropology
Psychology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Acocella, Domenick
Cordero, Rene
Date Added:
01/01/2021
Annotated Bibliography Assignment for English 201
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CC BY
Rating

This assignment will help students of English Composition II to construct an annotated bibliography as a precursor to a research paper.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
DeKlein, Elida
Date Added:
08/01/2018
Antillean Literature - Comparative Literature in the Spanish Antilles, Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
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This course will cover literature from Spanish Antilles and will be conducted in English. We will include a study of foundational texts in translation, from the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as contemporary works by Cuban, Dominican, and Puerto Rican authors.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Romo-Carmona, Mariana
Date Added:
10/01/2019
Antología Abierta De Literatura Hispana
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CC BY
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Una antología crítica de textos literarios del mundo hispanohablante. Se enfoca en autores canónicos y también se intenta incluir voces marginadas. Cada texto tiene una introducción y anotaciones creadas por estudiantes.

A critical anthology of literary texts from the Spanish-speaking world. A focus on canonical authors and an attempt to include voices that have been marginalized. Each text includes an introduction and annotations created by students.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Julie Ward
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Antony and Cleopatra
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CC BY-NC
Rating

The Folger Shakespeare Library provides the full searchable text of "As You Like It" to read online or download as a PDF. All of the lines are numbered sequentially to make it easier and more convenient to find any line.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
William Shakespeare
Date Added:
10/23/2018
Approaching Shakespeare Lecture Series
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Each lecture in this series focuses on a single play by Shakespeare, and employs a range of different approaches to try to understand a central critical question about it. Rather than providing overarching readings or interpretations, the series aims to show the variety of different ways we might understand Shakespeare, the kinds of evidence that might be used to strengthen our critical analysis, and, above all, the enjoyable and unavoidable fact that Shakespeare's plays tend to generate our questions rather than answer them.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Emma Smith
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Arabic Grammar of the Written Language (PDF)
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First published in 1910, this book focuses exclusively on the grammar of Modern Standard Arabic as it is used in written Arabic. It contains an introduction that explains the Arabic alphabet and pronunciation and 49 lessons that describe the foundational grammatical elements of MSA, including articles, gender, and the noun and verb systems. The text includes Arabic-English and English-Arabic vocabulary sections as well as a supplement with extract from the Qur'an, classical literature, media, and correspondence. The filesize of the PDF is 32 MB.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Julius Groos
Author:
Ernst Harder
Griffithes Wheeler Thatcher
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization, Spring 2005
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Studies the relation between imaginative texts and the culture surrounding them. Emphasizes ways in which imaginative works absorb, reflect, and conflict with reigning attitudes and world views. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication. Topic for Fall: Ethical Interpretation. Topic for Spring: Women Reading, Women Writing. The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, ChrĚŠtien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attention will be paid to how the narrative material of the story gets transformed according to the particular religious and political agendas of each new author.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cain
James
Date Added:
01/01/2005
The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability, Spring 2008
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The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course therefore aims to broaden students’ appreciation for and understanding of how literature interacts with--both reflecting upon and contributing to--the scientific understanding of the world. We are just as centrally committed to encouraging students to regard imaginative literature as a unique contribution to knowledge in its own right, and to see literary works of art as objects that demand and richly repay close critical analysis. It is our hope that the course will serve students well if they elect to pursue further work in Literature or other discipline in SHASS, and also enrich or complement their understanding of probability and statistics in other scientific and engineering subjects they elect to take.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jackson, Noel
Kibel, Alvin
Raman, Shankar
Date Added:
01/01/2008
As You Like It
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The Folger Shakespeare Library provides the full searchable text of "All's Well That Ends Well" to read online or download as a PDF. All of the lines are numbered sequentially to make it easier and more convenient to find any line.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
William Shakespeare
Date Added:
10/23/2018
Basic Themes in French Literature and Culture, Spring 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Childhood is a source of fascination in most Western cultures. It is both a major inspiration for artistic creation and a political ideal, which aims at protecting future generations. Which role does it play in French society and in other francophone areas? Why is the French national anthem (La Marseillaise) addressed to its 'children'? This course will study the transformation of childhood since the 18th century and the development of sentimentality within the family. We will examine various representations of childhood in literature (e.g. Pagnol, Proust, Sarraute, Laye, Morgiĺvre), movies (e.g. Truffaut), and songs (e.g. Brel, Barbara). Course taught in French.

Subject:
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perreau, Bruno
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Benito Cereno
Read the Fine Print
Rating

An edition of Melville's text with resources added by a student group project.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Herman Melville
Date Added:
03/28/2019
Bestsellers: The Memoir, Spring 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
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What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions and others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will closely examine some recent memoirs: Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life, Barack Obama's Dreams From My Father, Edwidge Danticat's Brother, I'm Dying, Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Infidel, and Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. Students will write two brief papers: a critical essay and an experiment in memoir.As a "Sampling," this class offers 6 units, with a strong emphasis on close reading, group discussion, focused writing, and research and presentation skills.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2010
British Literature II: Romantic Era to the Twentieth Century and Beyond
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CC BY-SA
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The University of North Georgia Press and Affordable Learning Georgia bring you British Literature II: Romantic Era to the Twentieth Century and Beyond.
Featuring 37 authors and full texts of their works, the selections in this open anthology represent the literature developed within and developing through their respective eras. This completely-open anthology will connect students to the conversation of literature that has captivated readers in the past and still holds us now.
Features:
Contextualizing introductions to the Romantic era; the Victorian era; and the Twentieth Century and beyond.
Over 90 historical images.
In-depth biographies of each author.
Instructional Design features, including Reading and Review Questions.
This textbook is an Open Educational Resource. It can be reused, remixed, and reedited freely without seeking permission.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Bonnie J Robinson
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Building & Managing Teams in Support-Based Teaching by Lea Fridman
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This method and enclosed materials developed by Professor Lea W. Fridman, Ph.D., uses Permanent Teams, a rotating Team Leader and the use of social media and group chats to facilitate student teams as support.

Subject:
Literature
World Cultures
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Student Guide
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Christina Katopodis
Date Added:
03/04/2021
CLAS 2109: Self and Society
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Open Educational Resource (OER) created for the Classics 2109 sections taught by professors Thibodeau, Smith, Luhrs, and Sage. This course is designed to introduce you to the main themes and ideas of self and society in the literature ranging from Classical to modern. We will explore the social, political, and religious environments that govern different societies, and the role of the individual in these societies, as shown in literature of different periods and cultures. Through a combination of lectures, class discussions, and student writing assignments, we will actively engage and critically analyze the texts themselves. By the end of the term you, the student, will be able to use with accuracy and precision basic terms of literary analysis relevant to the class readings, to read literary texts critically and to write interpretive prose, which is clear and cogent.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
David K. Sage
Gail Smith
JoAnn Luhrs
Philip Thibodeau
Date Added:
12/26/2020
CLAS 3200: Greek and Roman Mythology
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Open Educational Resource (OER) created for the Classics 3200 sections taught by professors Pletcher and Schur.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
David Schur
James Pletcher
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Civil War, Spring 2010
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This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Petersen, Roger
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome, Fall 2004
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Concentrates on specific periods of Classical Greek and Roman Literature in translation with attention to cultural, political, and social influences. Topics vary from year to year chosen from among fifth-century Athens, the Golden Age of Latin Literature, the Silver Age, and Late Antiquity. Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses among individual authors to the profound structural changes that Roman society was undergoing at this time. Particular attention will be devoted to the reorganization of society and the self through textuality, the changing dimensions of the public and the private, the roles of class and gender, and the relationship between art and pleasure. Writings covering a wide variety of literary genres will include the works of Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Livy, Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, with additional readings from Cassius Dio for background.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cain, James
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Classics of Chinese Literature, Fall 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course is an introduction to three of the major genres of traditional Chinese literature - poetry, fiction and drama, with a focus on vernacular fiction. We will read translations of a number of the "masterworks" of Chinese literature. We will also examine the intertextuality between these genres - how poetry blends into narrative, how fiction becomes drama, and drama inspires fiction. Through reading these selected works of traditional Chinese literature, we will examine some of the major features of traditional Chinese society: religious and philosophical beliefs, the imperial system and dynastic change, gender relations, notions of class and ethnicity, family, romance and sexuality. All works are read in translation; no language background is necessary.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Emma Teng
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Claudia Rankine‰Ûªs Citizen and South African Literature: Comparing and Contrasting Racism in the US and South African Context [Literature]
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ENG295 World Literatures Written in English is the capstone course for the Writing and Literature major. Students in their final year at LaGuardia take the course before many of them move on to English programs at Hunter, Queens, Brooklyn, and City Colleges. This section of the course focused on South African literature from right before the fall of Apartheid (1990) through the present. Throughout the semester, we discussed the question of individual responsibility in relation to the readings, particularly in Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela's A Human Being Died That Night and JM Coetzee's Disgrace. These particular texts brought up questions of how we deal with stories of unspeakable trauma and what is the price that society has to pay in order to overcome them. The ethics of individual responsibility is central to these texts. In addition, we also had a guest speaker who visited the class and graciously told us the story of her own upbringing in Apartheid South Africa. Her descriptions of the way skin and hair became markers of racial categorization held resonance in the United States' own history of racial oppression. I thought these discussions would culminate in an in-class reflective essay that would allow the students to make connections between their own experiences and those that they read and heard about coming from the other side of the world. The glue that would bind South Africa and the United States was a poem by Claudia Rankine's Citizen: An American Lyric. The concrete experience of micro-aggression captured in the small prose poem would allow the students to compare and contrast the systematic oppression of South Africa and the current pernicious and pervasive forms of racism present in our own society. This reflective essay would be an opportunity for the students to synthesize the discussions and readings from throughout the semester and bring it back to their own experience. In the end, the assignment captured all three of the dimensions found in the Global Learning Competency and expected students to demonstrate advanced the writing skills.
LaGuardia's Core Competencies and Communication Abilities
Main Course Learning Objectives: Enable students to understand evolving literary traditions in the global context. Compare and contrast historical and social periods across geo-political boundaries. Enable students to compare and contrast historical and social periods across geo-political boundaries. Reinforce and develop research and writing skills acquired in English 101 and 102. Reinforce and develop critical thinking skills needed to interpret and analyze literary texts.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
LaGuardia Community College
Author:
Kapetanakos, Demetrios
Date Added:
10/01/2017