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  • Ecology
Animal Behavior, Fall 2013
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Most of the major categories of adaptive behavior can be seen in all animals. This course begins with the evolution of behavior, the driver of nervous system evolution, reviewed using concepts developed in ethology, sociobiology, other comparative studies, and in studies of brain evolution. The roles of various types of plasticity are considered, as well as foraging and feeding, defensive and aggressive behavior, courtship and reproduction, migration and navigation, social activities and communication, with contributions of inherited patterns and cognitive abilities. Both field and laboratory based studies are reviewed; and finally, human behavior is considered within the context of primate studies.

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Schneider, Gerald
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Applied Ecology
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Applied ecology is a framework for the application of knowledge about ecosystems so that actions can be taken to create a better balance and harmony between people and nature in order to reduce human impact on other beings and their habitats.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Chemicals in the Environment
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This kit is a historical overview of American representations of chemicals from the three sisters to the Love Canal. It compares conflicting constructions about nuclear reactor safety, depleted uranium, Rachel Carson and DDT. Through analyzing diverse historic and contemporary media messages, students understand changing public knowledge, impressions and attitudes about chemicals in the environment.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Biology
Ecology
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Coastal Processes, Hazards and Society
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Has your attention recently been caught by news of coastal catastrophes such as hurricanes and tsunamis? Do you wonder why so many coastal communities in the world are vulnerable to flooding and other coastal hazards? Have you considered what coastal flood protections cities like Houston and Miami will need in the future to protect their residents? This course will provide a better understanding of these phenomena. We present a global perspective of coastal landscapes, the geologic processes responsible for their formation, and ways that society responds to hazards like sea level rise and catastrophic weather events. You will participate in active learning exercises such as analyzing real-world datasets and applying critical thinking to real-world societal problems while investigating a coastal community.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Biology
Ecology
Oceanography
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Brent Yarnal
Tim Bralower
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Dynamics of Complex Systems: Complexity in Ecology, Spring 2000
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An introduction to theoretical studies of systems of many interacting components, the individual dynamics of which may be simple, but the collective dynamics of which are often nonlinear and analytically intractable. Topics vary from year to year. Format includes both pedagogical lectures and round-table reviews of current literature. Subjects of interest include: problems in natural science (e.g., geology, ecology, and biology) where quantitative theory is still in development; problems in physics, such as turbulence, that demonstrate powerful concepts such as scaling and universality; and modern computational methods for the simulation and study of such problems. Discussions in context of contemporary experimental or observational data.

Subject:
Ecology
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Rothman, Daniel
Date Added:
01/01/2000
Earth Law and the Rights of Nature A New Generation of Laws Built for Nature
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Earth Law and the Rights of Nature: A New Generation of Laws Built for Nature Wilson, Grant, Kayman, Lindsey, Bartlett, Paul, and Milena Popov John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Earth Law Center, Environmental Education Fund
Forget doom and gloom. Let’s educate students about the Rights of Nature, an inspiring, evolving legal development which is gaining traction in the US and around the world, and which can promote the cultural shift needed to address our overlapping intersecting environmental crises — climate change, accelerating species extinction, and ecosystem collapse. The Rights of Nature is one aspect of Earth Law. Some of the other specific movements falling under the banner of Earth law are nonhuman rights for animals, defining ecocide as a crime, rights of future generations, legal guardianship for nature, and Indigenous legalities. In most countries, Nature has the legal status of mere property. The Rights of Nature recognizes that humans and Nature are in a relationship, rather than Nature merely providing a hoard of natural resources for indiscriminate human use. The legal structures discussed in Rights of Nature literature codifies the details of this restored relationship, rather than actually creating it. Nature becomes a legal entity with basic rights: the right to exist, flourish, thrive and regenerate. The Rights of Nature can also complement Indigenous rights by empowering Indigenous peoples to serve as legal guardians of their traditional territories. This poster and a companion open access CUNY Commons webpage and repository will provide links to curated video clips, films, case studies, a course book, a graduate level course syllabus, mock trial workshops, and written materials that can be used for incorporating the Rights of Nature and complimentary legal movements concepts into curricula.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Law
Life Science
Biology
Ecology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Author:
Bartlett, Paul
Kayman, Lindsey
Popov, Milena
Wilson, Grant
Date Added:
04/22/2021
Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability, Spring 2008
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This course provides a review of physical, chemical, ecological, and economic principles used to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Mass balance concepts are applied to ecology, chemical kinetics, hydrology, and transportation; energy balance concepts are applied to building design, ecology, and climate change; and economic and life cycle concepts are applied to resource evaluation and engineering design. Numerical models are used to integrate concepts and to assess environmental impacts of human activities. Problem sets involve development of MATLABĺ¨ models for particular engineering applications. Some experience with computer programming is helpful but not essential.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Ecology
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
McLaughlin, Dennis
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Ecology I: The Earth System, Fall 2009
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" We will cover fundamentals of ecology, considering Earth as an integrated dynamic system. Topics include coevolution of the biosphere, geosphere, atmosphere and oceans; photosynthesis and respiration; the hydrologic, carbon and nitrogen cycles. We will examine the flow of energy and materials through ecosystems; regulation of the distribution and abundance of organisms; structure and function of ecosystems, including evolution and natural selection; metabolic diversity; productivity; trophic dynamics; models of population growth, competition, mutualism and predation. This course is designated as Communication-Intensive; instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided. Biology is a recommended prerequisite."

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Chisholm, Penny
DeLong, Edward
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Ecology and Evolution
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Introduction to the basic principles of ecology and evolutionary biology emphasizing quantitative approaches and hypothesis testing. Scientific reasoning, computer literacy, and writing skills are developed in the laboratory.

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Lohman, David J
Date Added:
08/26/2020
Energy Conservation
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Much of the general population believes that the energy sources we depend on are perpetual. While people believe that energy use is the culprit for environmental damage, they are not aware of the methods and principles by which energy conversion devices operate. This course will provide you with knowledge and information on the main operating principles of devices/appliances in common use and will help you in making energy efficient and economical choices. The objective of the course is to expose you to energy efficiency in day to day life in order to save money and energy and thereby protect the environment. I hope the information in this course will help you become an environmentally-responsible individual of this Global Village.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Sarma Pisupati
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Environmental Assessment Course
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This semester-long project on conducting an environmental audit of a college campus can be done by an individual or by groups of students working in teams. Each group will research a different aspect of campus operations; they will collect data, analyze their findings, and make recommendations for improvements. This SERC Starting Point site includes learning goals, context for use, teaching tips and materials, assessment, and references.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Life Science
Biology
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Cathy Manduca
Suzanne Savanick
Suzanne Savanick, Science Education Resource Center, Carleton College. Based on a Greening the Campus environmental studies colloquium course taught at Carleton College in 1991.
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Environmental Justice, Fall 2004
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Examines theories and practice of environmental justice, concerns about race, poverty, and the environment in both domestic and international contexts, exploring and critically analyzing philosophies, frameworks, and strategies underlying environmental justice movements. Examines case studies of environmental injustices, including: distribution of environmental quality and health, unequal enforcement of regulations, unequal access to resources to respond to environmental problems, and the broader political economy of decision-making around environmental issues. Explores how environmental justice movements relate to broader sustainable development goals and strategies. This class explores the foundations of the environmental justice movement, current and emerging issues, and the application of environmental justice analysis to environmental policy and planning. It examines claims made by diverse groups along with the policy and civil society responses that address perceived inequity and injustice. While focused mainly on the United States, international issues and perspectives are also considered.

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Carmin, JoAnn
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Environment and the Earth
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The Environment and the Earth class at the University of South Carolina participated in a campus environmental service-learning project where students collected data lighting, water fixtures, recycling bins, and trash in five academic buildings.

Subject:
Education
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Compiled by Suzanne Savanick, Science Education Resource Center. Based on Bixby et al. (2003), Ecology on Campus: Service Learning in Introductory Environmental Courses, Journal of College Science Teaching, v. 32, n.5, o, 327-331.
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Essentials of Oceanography
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The year is 2050 and your once-idyllic beachfront vacation home is now flooded up to the second story. The crab your family has enjoyed every Christmas for as long as you can remember has now become an endangered species. The oceans have changed. In Earth 540, Oceanography for Educators, we explore the mechanisms that lead to sea level rise and ocean acidification. We strive to understand how natural processes such as ocean currents, the gulf-stream, tides, plate tectonics, and the Coriolis Effect, affect our oceans and ocean basins. We then predict how man-made issues such as climate change and overfishing will affect our beloved waters and our livelihoods. Want to see into the future? Then this course is for you!

Subject:
Environmental Science
Biology
Ecology
Astronomy
Atmospheric Science
Oceanography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Chris Marone
Mike Arthur
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Estuarine Geography E & G SCI
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Estuarine Geography utilizes an ecological approach to understanding physical and biological parameters to estuarine evolution.. Superimposed upon that spatial site and situation are social, human, cultural and political activities. Humans role in estuarine evolution is discussed at length.

Subject:
Ecology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
John Looney
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Field Seminar in International Political Economy, Fall 2003
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Review of IPE field covering previous and core research focusing on dual national objectives in a global context, namely pursuit of power and pursuit of wealth. Surveys major paradigms of international political economy, including neoclassical economics, development and ecological economics, lateral pressure, and perspectives and structural views of power relations. Examines interaction of politics and economics on international trade, capital flows, foreign investment, intellectual property rights, international migration, and select issues in foreign economic policy in global context. Examines the evolution of international economic institutions and attendant political implications. Open to undergraduates by permission of instructor.

Subject:
Finance
Ecology
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Choucri, Nazli
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Food and the Future Environment
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The Future of Food is an introductory-level science course that emphasizes the challenges facing food systems in the 21st century, and issues of sustainability for agriculture and other food production activities, as well as the challenges posed by food insecurity and modern diets to human health and well-being. Topics covered include introduction to the coupled-system perspective, historical development of food systems, socioeconomic aspects of the food system, interaction of the food system with the Earth's environment including soil, water, biota and climate, and the future of the food system considering potential changes such as in climate, urbanization, and demography.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Biology
Ecology
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
NULL
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Foshan China Workshop, Spring 2004
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This practicum focuses on applying the principles of sustainability to improve the quality of life and activity along the Foshan downtown riverfront. The City has recently engaged in several planning efforts that, with the help of consultants and experts, will help to identify strategies to revitalize the City's center and establish a new downtown. This practicum will compliment these efforts by focusing on planning and design options in and around the Pearl River, a now underutilized waterway that runs through the City's new downtown.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lee, Tunney
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Freshwater Ecology/Limnology
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Students study aquatic organisms in relation to the environmental conditions of lakes and streams. The course develops substantial quantities of data concerning the local watershed. This data is used by community partners in many contexts.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Ecology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Course taught by Dave Potter, Unity College. Example compiled by Suzanne Savanick, Science Education Resource Center.
Date Added:
03/04/2019
From Meteorology to Mitigation: Understanding Global Warming
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Human-caused climate change represents one of the great environmental challenges of our time. As it is inextricably linked with issues of energy policy, a familiarity with the fundamentals of climate change is critical for those looking to careers in the energy field. To appreciate the societal, environmental, and economic implications of policies governing greenhouse gas emissions, one must understand the basic underlying science. METEO 469 serves to lay down the fundamental scientific principles behind climate change and global warming. A firm grounding in the science is then used as a launching point for exploring issues involving climate change impacts and mitigation.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ecology
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Brian Gaudet
Michael Mann
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Gaoming Studio - China, Spring 2005
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The studio will focus on the district of Gaoming, located in the northwest of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) - the fastest growing and most productive region of China. The District has recently completed a planning effort in which several design institutes and a Hong Kong planning firm prepared ideas for a new central area near the river. The class will complement these efforts by focusing on planning and design options on the waterfront of the proposed new district and ways of integrating water/hydrological factors into all aspects and land uses of a modern city (residential, commercial, industrial) - including watershed and natural ecosystem protection, economic and recreational activities, transportation, and tourism.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Ecology
Hydrology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lee, Tunney
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Geographic Perspectives on Sustainability and Human-Environment Systems
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What factors lead to a natural disaster? What causes a famine? Why do cities flood? According to a recent article in The Atlantic, Houston's flooding during the 2017 Hurricane Harvey was primarily caused by impervious pavement which prevents the absorption of water into the land. This example illustrates how nature and society are interlinked, which is the main focus of Geography 30, Penn State's introductory course to nature-society geography. In addition to examining the linkages between human development and natural hazards, this course will also explore human society's connection to food systems, climate change, urbanization and biodiversity. The course will also cover topics of ethics and decision making in order to help students evaluate the tradeoffs of these interconnections.
\The Atlantic\" needs to be made into a link pointing to this: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/08/why-cities-flood/538251/"

Subject:
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ecology
Geology
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Brian King
Chongming Wang
Karl Zimmerer
Petra Tschakert
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Geography of Water Resources
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Geography 431 is designed to further understanding of the natural processes of aquatic ecosystems, management of water resources, and threats to sustaining water quantity. Develop awareness and appreciation of the perspectives about water as a precious resource, commodity, and sometimes hazard. Learn how and why water is distributed unevenly around the Earth. Examine how resource management decisions are strongly related to water availability, quantity, and quality. The course examines water resources management; dams and dam removal; provision of safe potable water; threats to water quantity and quality; land use changes; the water economy; water laws and policy; institutions for water management at the global, national, regional, and local scale; and issues of water security and climate change.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Ecology
Hydrology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Michael Nassry
Rob Brooks
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Geology of the National Parks
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Geysers and grizzlies and glaciers, oh my. The national parks may be America's best idea, saving the finest parts of the nation for everyone to enjoy forever. What better way to learn about the natural world than to tour the parks with us? We'll explore how the mountains and valleys formed and why they often come with volcanoes and earthquakes. You'll see what really killed the dinosaurs and how we can help save their modern relatives in the parks. With film clips, slide shows, and our geological interpretations of classic rock songs, isn't it time for a road trip?

Subject:
Environmental Science
Biology
Ecology
Geology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Richard Alley
Sridhar Anandakrishnan
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Good Food: The Ethics and Politics of Food Choices, Spring 2017
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This course explores the values (aesthetic, moral, cultural, religious, prudential, political) expressed in the choices of food people eat. It analyzes the decisions individuals make about what to eat, how society should manage food production and consumption collectively, and how reflection on food choices might help resolve conflicts between different values.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ecology
Nutrition
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Sally Haslanger
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Healing Earth: Energy
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Meeting the energy needs of human beings depends on a thorough understanding of the science of energy. Acting to meeting those needs in an environmentally and socially responsible way depends on ethical analysis and spiritual reflection. As with every topic in Healing Earth, today's energy challenges must be approached from the standpoint of an integral ecology--a standpoint that integrates science, ethics, spirituality, and action.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Loyola University Chicago
Provider Set:
International Jesuit Ecology Project
Author:
Bill Anderson
Carolyn Martsberger
Christopher Peterson
Clyde Goulden
David Slavsky
George McGraw
Hilly Ann Roa-Quiaoit
Jaime Tatay
Jame Schaefer
Jennifer L. Snyder
Jesse Manuta
Jo Beth D'Agostino
Julie Belandres-Otadoy
Lazar Savari
Leonard Chiti
Luiz Felife Guanaes Rego
Meghan Toomey
Michael Schuck
Nancy Tuchman
Nélida Naveros Córdova
Nicholas Tete
Patrick Daubenmire
Paulus Wiryono
Pedro Linares
Pedro Walpole
Philip Nahlik
Ping Jing
Rachel Hart Winter
Rev. John S.J. Braverman
Shannon Jung
Stephen Mitten
Thomas Lovejoy
Veronica Gaylie
William French
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Healing Earth: Natural Resources
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All life depends on Earth's natural resources. In a tragic paradox, human beings are extracting needed, non-renewable resources at a rate that will exhaust the supply for future generations. It is imprudent to place all hope in a technological solution to this paradox. A change in human behavior will have to accompany any realistic attempt to preserve and protect Earth's precious natural resources.

Meeting this challenge must begin with a thorough understanding of the science behind natural resources. Similarly, any proposed actions will require careful ethical analysis and spiritual reflection. As with every topic in Healing Earth, natural resources must be approached from the standpoint of an integral ecology--a standpoint that integrates science, ethics, spirituality, and action.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Loyola University Chicago
Provider Set:
International Jesuit Ecology Project
Author:
Bill Anderson
Carolyn Martsberger
Christopher Peterson
Clyde Goulden
David Slavsky
George McGraw
Hilly Ann Roa-Quiaoit
Jaime Tatay
Jame Schaefer
Jennifer L. Snyder
Jesse Manuta
Jo Beth D'Agostino
Julie Belandres-Otadoy
Lazar Savari
Leonard Chiti
Luiz Felife Guanaes Rego
Meghan Toomey
Michael Schuck
Nancy Tuchman
Nélida Naveros Córdova
Nicholas Tete
Patrick Daubenmire
Paulus Wiryono
Pedro Linares
Pedro Walpole
Philip Nahlik
Ping Jing
Rachel Hart Winter
Rev. John S.J. Braverman
Shannon Jung
Stephen Mitten
Thomas Lovejoy
Veronica Gaylie
William French
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Healing Earth: Water
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This chapter of the Healing Earth e-textbook outlines the water's physical structure and characteristics, describes the hydrologic cycle and shows the sources and uses of water. The chapter utilizes the Ignatian pedagogy to further a reader's understanding of water in terms of ethics, spirituality, and action. It includes a case study of the River Ganges.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Loyola University Chicago
Provider Set:
International Jesuit Ecology Project
Author:
Bill Anderson
Carolyn Martsberger
Christopher Peterson
Clyde Goulden
David Slavsky
George McGraw
Hilly Ann Roa-Quiaoit
Jaime Tatay
Jame Schaefer
Jennifer L. Snyder
Jesse Manuta
Jo Beth D'Agostino
Julie Belandres-Otadoy
Lazar Savari
Leonard Chiti
Luiz Felife Guanaes Rego
Meghan Toomey
Michael Schuck
Nancy Tuchman
Nélida Naveros Córdova
Nicholas Tete
Patrick Daubenmire
Paulus Wiryono
Pedro Linares
Pedro Walpole
Philip Nahlik
Ping Jing
Rachel Hart Winter
Rev. John S.J. Braverman
Shannon Jung
Stephen Mitten
Thomas Lovejoy
Veronica Gaylie
William French
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Household Food Security. Module 4 - Food Behaviour and Nutrition
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CC BY-SA
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In Module 4 you are revising the important concepts from Module 1 such as food security,food insecurity, nutrition security and livelihood security. We add nutrition for the vulnerable,food behaviour, food choices, dietary patterns and diet diversity, as well as the role played by different stakeholders involved in food security. Together with the households you will gain knowledge on these issues and help the households themselves to gather information about their nutrition related problems, vulnerability, risks and malnutrition. You will together with them analyse the causes of these problems on different levels, from the macro to the micro level. The most important set of skills you will learn is how to work with households as a facilitator.

Subject:
Ecology
Nutrition
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
OER Africa
Author:
FM Ferreira
Date Added:
07/01/2010
Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) ePrimer
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This ITS ePrimer provides transportation professionals with fundamental concepts and practices related to ITS technologies. This resource can help practicing professionals and students better understand how ITS is integrated into the planning, design, deployment, and operations of surface transportation systems. The ePrimer is both a stand-alone reference document for the practitioner as well as a text for education and training programs.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Automotive Technology and Repair
Education
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Case Study
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Center for Automotive Technology - Macomb
Provider Set:
Center for Advanced Automotive Technology
Author:
Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office, U.S. Department of Transportation
Date Added:
09/01/2013
Introduction to Ecology (Open Course)
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CC BY-NC
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Introduction to Ecology is an open course remix of the OpenStax Biology open textbook. The remix includes a modular revision of parts of the text with supplemental questions added.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Andrea Darracq
Ching-Yu Huang
Enes Aganovic
Hugo Collantes
James Wilkison
Janice Crook-Hill
Terri Bell
Date Added:
03/20/2018
Introduction to Environmental History, Spring 2011
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Focusing primarily on the period since 1500, explores the influence of climate, topography, plants, animals, and microorganisms on human history and the reciprocal influence of people on the environment. Topics include the European encounter with the Americas, the impact of modern technology, and the historical roots of the current environmental crisis.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ritvo, Harriet
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Introduction to Evolutionary Biology and Ecology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course describes biological changes that happen on a very large scale, across entire populations of organisms and over the course of millions of years, in the form of evolution and ecology. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Use their understanding of Mendelian genetics and patterns of inheritance to predict genotypes and phenotypes of offspring or work backwards to identify the genotypes and phenotypes of a parental generation; Distinguish between inheritance patterns that involve autosomal vs. sex-linked traits and identify the respective consequences of each type of inheritance; Identify what distinguishes DarwinĺÎĺĺÎĺs theory of evolution from other arguments that attempt to explain diversity across species and/or many generations; Identify which of many types of natural selection is acting on a particular population/species; Identify which of many types of sexual selection is acting on a particular population/species; Identify the factors that alter the frequencies of alleles in populations over time and describe the effects of these factors on populations; Recognize, read, and create phylogenies and cladograms, using them to explain evolutionary relationships; Determine the ecological interactions affecting a particular community and identify the effects of specific relationships (e.g. symbiosis, competition) on species within that community; Distinguish between world biomes in terms of their climate, nutrient cycles, energy flow, and inhabitants; Use their knowledge of nutrient cycles and energy flow to estimate the effect that changes in physical or biological factors would have on a particular ecosystem. (Biology 102; See also: Psychology 204)

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Introduction to Evolutionary Biology and Ecology - Laboratory
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This lab course supplements ĺÎĺĺĺŤIntroduction to Evolutionary Biology and EcologyĄ_ĺĺö. Although it does not replicate a true lab experience, it does encourage greater familiarity with scientific thinking and techniques, and will enable exploration of some key principles of evolutionary biology and ecology. This lab supplement focuses on visual understanding, application, and practical use of knowledge. In each unit, the student will work through tutorials related to important scientific concepts and then will be asked to think creatively about how that knowledge can be put to practical or experimental use. Upon successful completion of this lab supplement, the student will be able to: Display an understanding of Mendelian inheritance as applied to organisms in virtual experiments; Describe the process of natural selection and understand how it will alter populations over generations and under a variety of selection pressures; Understand how the process of speciation is affected by isolation and selection pressures; Understand predator-prey dynamics under a variety of ecological conditions; Distinguish between biomes in terms of their structure/climates as well as the types and diversity of organisms that inhabit them. (Biology 102 Laboratory)

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Genetics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Population Ecology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Population ecology is the subfield of ecology that identifies those ecological factors--in the community or in the ecosystem--that regulate a population's size. The student will learn about intrinsic population growth and discover how such growth can be quantified, along with the factors that inhibit growth. Also, the student will apply his or her understanding of population ecology to determine a population's current status and construct a management plan to maintain population size. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how population ecology is used to address problems in evolution, conservation, epidemiology, and resource management; describe the interactions among and between the biotic and abiotic components of a healthy ecosystem and explain how these components are interdependent; identify factors that threaten the maintenance of biodiversity in ecosystems and the population measures used to sustain ecosystem biodiversity; use mathematical models and equations to describe population growth and interaction between populations; identify density-dependent and density-independent factors that affect population growth and regulation; employ the principles and techniques of population dynamics and ecology to analyze population viability and develop a resource management plan by using data gathered from a sample population. (Biology 313)

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Sarita Wetland Restoration
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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The Sarita Wetland restoration on the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities campus is used as teaching tools by numerous classes. Students, staff and faculty have collaborated on the planning and implementation of the project. This example highlights the restoration process, and specifically references one of the classes, the Water Quality class.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Syllabus
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Suzanne Savanick, Science Education Resource Center, Carleton College, ssavanic@carleton.edu. Based on a Water Quality class taught by Jim Perry, University of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota Sustainable Campus Initiative, coordinated by Suzanne Savanick.
Date Added:
03/04/2019
The Science Essay, Spring 2009
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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" The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact")."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Journalism
Educational Technology
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Boiko, Karen
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Soil Behavior, Spring 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Detailed study of soil properties with emphasis on interpretation of field and laboratory test data and their use in soft-ground construction engineering. Includes: consolidation and secondary compression; basic strength principles; stress-strain strength behavior of clays, emphasizing effects of sample disturbance, anisotropy, and strain rate; strength and compression of granular soils; and engineering properties of compacted soils. Some knowledge of field and laboratory testing assumed.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jen, Lucy
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Sustainable Design and Technology Research Workshop, Spring 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This workshop investigates the current state of sustainability in regards to architecture, from the level of the tectonic detail to the urban environment. Current research and case studies will be investigated, and students will propose their own solutions as part of the final project.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Ecology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Glicksman, Leon R.
Date Added:
01/01/2004