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Africana Folklore
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Welcome to Africana Folklore. This course explores the oral, customary and material folklore of Africans and their descendants in the Americas and the Caribbean. We will use readings and films to examine various ways West African folklore was transmitted to and survived in the New World, and how Africans in the Americas created new oral, customary and material traditions. We will compare and contrast fictional and historical folk characters from Africa, the Northern and Southern American hemispheres, with a special focus on the English, Spanish and French-speaking Caribbean. We will examine some of the customs and practices that continue to exist in those regions and how all have contributed to global culture. In addition to required readings, there will also be weekly writing exercises. This course is designed to help prepare you for further academic study in general, and African, African-American and Caribbean studies, specifically. It will introduce you to the various disciplines that inform the study of people of African descent worldwide.

Subject:
Anthropology
Ethnic Studies
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Javiela Evangelista
Date Added:
12/10/2018
American Identities: AMST 1010
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This course is an introduction to American Studies through the questions of identity. How are our identities formed and how do they function? What does it mean to be “American,” who claims this identity, and on what terms? How do American identities shape—and how are they shaped by—factors such as class, race, ethnicity, gender, language, nation, and sexuality?

This semester, we will examine diverse American identities, with an emphasis on the social and cultural forces that mold them. We will explore the structural differences that divide individuals and groups, and ways that people challenge or transcend these divisions. This interdisciplinary course integrates materials from literary studies, history, ethnic and gender studies, and sociology. We will read some academic theories about identity, but will more often read what a wide range of Americans have written about their own individual and collective identities.

The aim is to help you better understand your own and other people’s identities, the languages and conventions that writers use to analyze identities, and how varied perspectives on identity in the United States and the Americas speak to—and at times against—one another. Rather than settle on a final definition of either “America” or “identity,” we will explore both as products of on-going dialogue, debate, and change.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Conor Tomas Reed
Emily Fairey
Date Added:
03/15/2021
American Indian Stories
Read the Fine Print
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This collection of stories was written by Dakota Sioux author Zitkala-Sa, also known as Gertrude Bonnin. Helen Keller sent a testimonial letter to the author on August 25, 1919: "I thank you for your book on Indian legends. I have read them with exquisite pleasure. Like all folk tales they mirror the child life of the world. There is in them a note of wild, strange music." The text here presented was published in 1921 by Hayworth Publishing in Washington, D.C.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Literature
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Zitkala-Sa aka Gertrude Bonnin
Date Added:
10/22/2019
The American Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives
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This OER (open educational resource) is to act as an ongoing resource for those full and part-time faculty teaching Brooklyn College’s Anthropology Course, ANTH 3135 — The US Urban Experience: Anthropological Perspectives. This is a living document, which came out of discussions among instructors teaching this course and will continue to grow as we continue to meet each semester to discuss the course.

Subject:
Anthropology
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Meghan Ference
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Analog and Digital Telephony
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This course is an introduction to modern telephone networks and interfaces. Telephone sets, the central office and the Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN) are discussed in detail. Private Branch Exchanges (PBX) and public switches, both digital and analog, are discussed, with emphasis on features, signaling and technology. Concludes with the transmission of audio signals through different networks. Laboratory experiments supplement the course and expose students to the fundamentals of telephony.

Subject:
Applied Science
Career and Technical Education
Electronic Technology
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Zory Marantz
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Anatomy & Physiology I Lab
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This is the laboratory component of Anatomy & Physiology I. The concepts covered range from anatomical terminology, directional terms, body orientation to exercises on tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Olufemi Sodeinde
Date Added:
10/18/2019
Anatomy and Human Physiology Lab II
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This course is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. It covers the study of the structure and function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive and endocrine system, as well as development, metabolism, electrolytes and acid base balance.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Ralph Alcendor
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Anatomy and Physiology
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This is the open educational resource for BIO2311: Anatomy & Physiology I. This site provides all you will need for the course including a syllabus, link to the textbook, lecture notes, assignments, and all other related resources.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Debbie Priftakis
Date Added:
12/10/2018
Anatomy and Physiology I Lecture
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This course is the first part of the two semester course of Anatomy and Physiology. It integrates the anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs and human body systems, It includes the study of the gross and microscopic structure of the systems of the human body with special emphasis on the relationship between structure and function. It is based on OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology book and is supplemented by content from the Open Learning Initiative (Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initative) and Boundless Physiology Open Book.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Judyta Juranek
Date Added:
10/18/2019
Ancient Medicine: The Classical Roots of the Medical Humanities
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This site is for those interested in ancient medicine and the medical humanities, both at Brooklyn College and around the world. It features open access web resources and other resources available to the City University of New York community. It is committed to the use of Open Educational Resources (OER).

The medical humanities is a multidisciplinary field that embraces the study of medicine through the lenses of literature, history, philosophy, the social sciences, and the arts in the context of applied medicine and bioethics. It draws upon these diverse disciplines in pursuit of medical educational goals, and in its continued valuation of liberal arts education supports the classical ideals of critical analysis and cultural awareness concerning the sickness and health of society and the individual.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Michael Goyette
Date Added:
03/15/2021
Anthropology 1200: Human Origins
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This course aims to teach students about the evolutionary history, ecology, and behavior of humans and other primates, while also providing information on a range of topics including the history of evolutionary thought, natural selection, basic genetics, and elementary skeletal anatomy. No prior courses in anthropology or evolutionary biology are required.

Subject:
Anthropology
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Abigail Colby
Colin McDonald
Date Added:
05/14/2021
Anthropology - Culture and Society
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In this course, we will focus on a survey of topics that will help us hone the discussion on cultural production, manifestations, and contestations. The course will provide an interdisciplinary perspective grounded in Anthropology, but also including materials from other fields in the social sciences, such as History, and Cultural Studies. The course will also introduce students to the four-field approach in Anthropology (Cultural Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, and Linguistics). The geographical regions that will be covered in this class will be Latin America and the Caribbean (including its diasporas) and the United States of America. This will provide students with a context to discuss topics that include culture, race and ethnicity, connecting it to the main arguments around cultural difference, identity, political economy, health, food, environment, language, politics, gender, sports, and religion.

Subject:
Anthropology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Joseph A. Torres-González
Date Added:
07/18/2022
Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR)
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Created by Michelle Millar Fisher of the CUNY Graduate Center and Karen Shelby of Baruch College, "Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR) is a peer-populated platform for art history teachers. AHTR is home to a constantly evolving and collectively authored online repository of art history teaching content including, but not limited to, lesson plans, video introductions to museums, book reviews, image clusters, and classroom and museum activities. The site promotes discussion and reflection around new ways of teaching and learning in the art history classroom through a peer-populated blog, and fosters a collaborative virtual community for art history instructors at all career stages."

Subject:
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Lesson Plan
Reference
Provider:
CUNY
Author:
Karen Shelby
Michelle Millar Fisher
Date Added:
02/27/2019
Astronomy 141
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Welcome to Astronomy 141. Through this course you’ll have an understanding of the sky, Earth, Moon and the Sun, the solar system and the universe. This laboratory course introduces the fundamentals of astronomy such as: the apparent motion of the sky, Sun, Moon and planets; the nature of light; gravity; the properties of planets; the life cycles of stars; and the structure of the universe. Laboratory and computer exercises will be used, and we will conduct one nighttime lab.

As the learning outcomes, students who succeed in this course may eventually respond to:

How does the process of science work, and how does that process manifest itself in astronomy?
How is astronomy of practical use? How has astronomy impacted our understanding of our world?
What is a planet, and how are planets similar to—and different from—one another?
What is the interior of the Earth like, and how do we know?
What is a star? How are the stars similar to and different from one another?
How did the universe get started? What is likely to happen to the universe in the distant future?
[This project was created as part of the Open Pedagogy Fellowship at the Mina Rees Library, The Graduate Center].

Read more about the course design here: https://gclibrary.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2020/10/19/inclusive-education-and-research-for-astronomy/

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Yuzhe Song
Date Added:
06/24/2021
BIO 3004 Videos Research Experiences in Microbiomes Network (REMNet)
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Welcome to the Research Experiences in Microbiomes Network (REMNet) videos for Biology 3004. Here you will learn how you can incorporate next-generation microbiome sequencing into your biology course curriculum.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
REMNet (Research Experiences in Microbiomes Network)
Date Added:
03/09/2020
BIOL 4001: Field Botany
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Since we live in an urban environment with many trees, shrubs, and flower plantings this course is designed so that each student will always be able to walk down the street and have some familiarity with their environs. To that end, each student will learn to identify approximately 50-60 trees and shrubs and know them by their common name, scientific name and family, as well as some annuals and perennials commonly used as bedding plants. Students will learn some basic the botanical concepts, which are used in, plant identification, such as botanical structural features used in phylogeny and taxonomy of plants. In addition to this, students will get an overview of the ecological and economic aspects specific to urban botany.

Subject:
Botany
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Diagram/Illustration
Student Guide
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Anna Petrovicheva
Date Added:
06/02/2021