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The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries, Spring 2011
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This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey S.
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
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CC BY
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Ancient Civilizations of the World
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In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Building & Managing Teams in Support-Based Teaching by Lea Fridman
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This method and enclosed materials developed by Professor Lea W. Fridman, Ph.D., uses Permanent Teams, a rotating Team Leader and the use of social media and group chats to facilitate student teams as support.

Subject:
Literature
World Cultures
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Student Guide
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Christina Katopodis
Date Added:
03/04/2021
Canadian History: Post-Confederation
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This textbook introduces aspects of the history of Canada since Confederation. “Canada” in this context includes Newfoundland and all the other parts that come to be aggregated into the Dominion after 1867. Much of this text follows thematic lines. Each chapter moves chronologically but with alternative narratives in mind. What Aboriginal accounts must we place in the foreground? Which structures (economic or social) determine the range of choices available to human agents of history? What environmental questions need to be raised to gain a more complete understanding of choices made in the past and their ramifications? Each chapter is comprised of several sections and some of those are further divided. In many instances you will encounter original material that has been contributed by other university historians from across Canada who are leaders in their respective fields. They provide a diversity of voices on the subject of the nation’s history and, thus, an opportunity to experience some of the complexities of understanding and approaching the past. Canadian History: Post-Confederation includes Learning Objectives and Key Points in most chapter sections, intended to help identify issues of over-arching importance. Recent interviews with historians from across Canada have been captured in video clips that are embedded throughout the web version of the book. At the end of each chapter, the Summary section includes additional features: Key Terms, Short Answer Exercises, and Suggested Readings. The key terms are bolded in the text, and collected in a Glossary in the appendix.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century, Spring 2011
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This course covers the role of physics and physicists during the 20th century, focusing on Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Feynman. Beyond just covering the scientific developments, institutional, cultural, and political contexts will also be examined.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kaiser, David
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Empire and States in the Middle East and Southwest Asia
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This course introduces the history of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the pre-Islamic period to the end of World War I. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discuss the history of East Asia from the pre-Islamic period through the beginning of the 20th century; analyze the interactions between ancient civilizations of the Middle East and Southwest Asia in the pre-Islamic period; identify the origins of Islam, and assess the political and cultural impact of the Muslim faith on the peoples of the Middle East and the Mediterranean Basin; identify the origins of the Umayyad and Abbasid Empires, and assess how these dynasties reshaped political and economic life throughout the Middle East and Southwest Asia; describe and assess the social and cultural impact of Islam on the peoples of the Middle East and the Mediterranean Basin; identify external threats to the Muslim world during the Middle Ages, and analyze how Muslim leaders responded to these threats; identify the origins of the Ottoman Empire, and assess how the Ottomans established political and economic control over the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East; analyze the political, economic, and military interactions between the Ottoman Empire and the nations of Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries; explain how European imperialism destabilized the Middle East and Southwest Asia in the 19th and early 20th centuries and allowed European nations to establish political control over many Middle Eastern nations; analyze the political impact of World War I on the peoples and nations of the Middle East; analyze and interpret primary source documents from the pre-Islamic period through the beginning of the 20th century using historical research methods. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 231)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Foundations of the Modern World HIS 1102 ONLINE
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A chronological and thematic introduction to the history of European interaction with the wider world from the 1400s to the end of the 1800s. The course focuses on the central themes of global interconnectivity and discussions of nationalism, capitalism, colonialism, slavery, and trade. The purpose of this course is to give the student a taste of the people, events, triumphs, failures, anxieties, hopes, and fears that have shaped our histories and cultures.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Syllabus
Author:
Stefan Stankovic
Date Added:
05/01/2020
France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon, Spring 2011
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This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jeffrey S.
Ravel
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Heritage of Imperialism
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Welcome to The Heritage of Imperialism. This course offers an examination of the thought, structure, operation and results of imperialism in human history generally, and in the 19th/21st centuries in particular.

We will use readings and films to examine European/American imperialism in the non-white areas of the world: the role of the Industrial Revolution; the imposition of Western European institutions on indigenous peoples of Africa, Asia, North/South America; colonialism; attempts by these people to reestablish autonomous sociological and cultural system

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Javiela Evangelista
Date Added:
10/18/2019
Introduction to Puerto Rican and Latin@ Studies
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Survey and theoretical foundations in Puerto Rican and Latin@ Studies. Case study on Puerto Rico. Pertinent themes in Puerto Rican and Latin@ history, culture, literature, contemporary society, and politics. Impact of the United States? economic policies on Puerto Rico and the causes of Puerto Rican and LatinX migration to New York City and urban centers. Satisfies Pathways Flexible Core US Experience in Its Diversity requirement.

Subject:
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Bibliography
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Laura Pavón Aramburú
Date Added:
01/10/2022
Islam, The Middle East, and The West
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the twenty-first century. The course will emphasize the encounters and exchanges between the Islamic world and the West. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Islam became a sophisticated and far-reaching civilization and how conflicts with the West shaped the development of the Middle East from the medieval period to the present day. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify and describe the nature of pre-Islamic society, culture, and religion. They will also be able to describe the subsequent rise of the prophet Muhammad and his monotheistic religion, Islam; identify and describe the elements of Islamic law, religious texts and practices, and belief systems; identify and describe the rise of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties in the Middle East. Students will also be able to compare and contrast the two empires; identify and describe the emergence of the Umayyad dynasty in Spain. Students will also be able to analyze the conflicts between Muslims and Christians on the Iberian Peninsula; identify and describe the Crusades. They will be able to describe both Muslim and Christian perceptions of the holy wars; identify and describe the impact of the Mongol invasions on the Middle East; compare and contrast the Ottoman and Safavid empires; analyze the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the beginning of European imperialism/domination of the Middle East in the 1800s; identify and describe how and why European powers garnered increased spheres of influence after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the end of World War I; analyze and describe the rise of resistance and independence movements in the Middle East; identify and describe the rise of Islamic nationalism and the emergence of violent anti-Western sentiment; analyze (and synthesize) the relationship between the Middle East and the West between the 600s and the present day; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the exchanges and conflicts between the Islamic world and the West over time. (History 351)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Jewish History from Biblical to Modern Times, Fall 2007
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"This course explores how our views of Jewish history have been formed and how this history can explain the survival of the Jews as an ethnic/religious group into the present day. Special attention is given to the partial and fragmentary nature of our information about the past, and the difficulties inherent in decoding statements about the past that were written with a religious agenda in mind. It also considers complex events in Jewish history -- from early history as portrayed in the Bible to recent history, including the Holocaust."

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Temin, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2007
LAC 118 - Caribbean Society and Culture - Textbook
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Materials compiled for a Latin American Culture course on Caribbean society and culture. Seven units include: Pre-Colonial; Conquest and Genocide; Slaveholding System; Slavery & Capitalism; Caribbean Thinkers; Cold War & Development; Transnationalism and Diaspora.

Subject:
World Cultures
History
Ancient History
World History
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Hostos Community College
Author:
Víctor Torres-Vélez
Date Added:
04/03/2020
Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective, Fall 2009
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This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Smith, Merritt Roe
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Maria
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Una de las novelas cl‡sicas del romanticismo latinoamericano, Mar’a del colombiano Jorge Isaacs fue publicada en 1867. El intenso relato de amor entre Efra’n y Mar’a, enmarcado en la belleza y tenacidad del paisaje local, integra modelos estŽticos europeos a la realidad americana.

Subject:
Languages
Literature
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
Jorge Isaacs
Date Added:
03/28/2019
The Middle East in the 20th Century, Fall 2015
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This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abigail Jacobson
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy, Spring 2005
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Rating

Selective survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence at the start of the nineteenth century to the present. Issues studied include: independence and its aftermath, slavery and its abolition, Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the US, dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, and revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Modern Middle East and Southwest Asia
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of the nations and peoples of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from 1919 to the present. The course covers the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout the region during this 100-year period. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and explain major political, social and economic trends, events, and people in history of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the beginning of the 20th century to the present; Explain how the countries of the region have overcome significant social, economic, and political problems as they have grown from weak former colonies into modern nation-states; Identify and explain the emergence of nationalist movements following World War I, European political and economic imperialism during the first half of the 20th century, the creation of the nation of Israel, regional economic development, and the impact of secular and religious trends on Middle Eastern society and culture during the second half of the 20th century; Identify and explain the important economic, political, and social developments in the Middle East and Southwest Asia during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 20th and 21st centuries that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes. (History 232)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Modern Northeast Asia
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CC BY
Rating

Study of the history of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam) from the 19th century to the present. Analyzes the impact of European imperialism, Communism, and the creation of modern nation-states.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Narrating the Battle of Ciudad Juárez: An OER term project for a Latin American/border studies course
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A term project for undergraduate students of Latin American and/or border studies, focusing on the 1911 battle of Ciudad Juárez during the Mexican Revolution.

Subject:
Languages
World Cultures
Journalism
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Oswaldo Zavala
Date Added:
05/02/2021
The New Spain:1977-2015
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In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: Sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Margery Resnick
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Origins of Western Civilization
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This course is a chronological and thematic introduction to the history of Western interactions with the wider world from the late 1800s to the present, emphasizing the following events: the rise of nationalism in Europe and the race for empire in the late 19th century, the First World War, the interwar years, the Second World War, the Cold War, the post-Cold War world and the effects of globalization. It explores how the United State engaged with the Soviet Union via proxy wars and spheres of influence via third parties in Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. It shows students the cultural, social and political background and implications of this important period in history.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
New York City College of Technology
Author:
Stephanie Boyle
Date Added:
10/18/2019
Quiz on AfroLatinx Revolution
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CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

This sample quiz can be used by instructors after students watch Natasha S. Alford’s “Afro-Latinx Revolution: Puerto Rico,” a 30-minute documentary on Afro-Latinx experiences in Puerto Rico: https://youtu.be/8uM83LNZmWs. This resource is provided by Prof. Sonia Alejandra Rodríguez.Sonia Alejandra Rodríguez is an Associate Professor in the English Department at LaGuardia Community College, CUNY, where she teaches composition, literature, and creative writing.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
World Cultures
Journalism
Public Relations
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Christina Katopodis
Date Added:
04/06/2021
Trials in History, Fall 2000
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. Considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussion at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subject:
World History
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wood, Elizabeth A.
Date Added:
01/01/2000
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This historic document "was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly at its 183rd session on 10 December 1948 as Resolution 217 at the Palais de Chaillot in Paris, France." Prepared by the United Nationals Department of Public Information. For more information visit [The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights](https://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Pages/Language.aspx?LangID=eng).

Subject:
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Graduate Center
Author:
The United Nations
Date Added:
10/22/2019
The World: 1400-Present, Spring 2014
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course surveys the increasing interaction between communities, as the barrier of distance succumbed to both curiosity and new transport technologies. It explores Western Europe and the United States' rise to world dominance, as well as the great divergence in material, political, and technological development between Western Europe and East Asia post–1750, and its impact on the rest of the world. It examines a series of evolving relationships, including human beings and their physical environment; religious and political systems; and sub-groups within communities, sorted by race, class, and gender. It introduces historical and other interpretive methodologies using both primary and secondary source materials.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Anne McCants
Jeffrey S. Ravel
Date Added:
01/01/2014
World Civilizations I (Open Course)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This open course for World Civilization I at Georgia Southern University (Armstrong) was created under a Round Eight ALG Textbook Transformation Grant. The course includes readings, films, research, writing guidelines, online resources, and publishing opportunities.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Caroline Hopkinson
Hongjie Wang
Date Added:
03/20/2018
World History: Cultures, States, and Societies to 1500
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World History: Cultures, States, and Societies to 1500 offers a comprehensive introduction to the history of humankind from prehistory to 1500. Authored by six USG faculty members with advance degrees in History, this textbook offers up-to-date original scholarship. It covers such cultures, states, and societies as Ancient Mesopotamia, Ancient Israel, Dynastic Egypt, India’s Classical Age, the Dynasties of China, Archaic Greece, the Roman Empire, Islam, Medieval Africa, the Americas, and the Khanates of Central Asia.

It includes 350 high-quality images and maps, chronologies, and learning questions to help guide student learning. Its digital nature allows students to follow links to applicable sources and videos, expanding their educational experience beyond the textbook. It provides a new and free alternative to traditional textbooks, making World History an invaluable resource in our modern age of technology and advancement.

Subject:
Ancient History
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Andrew Reeves
Brian Parkinson
Charlotte Miller
Eugene Berger
George Israel
Nadejda Williams
Date Added:
09/22/2016