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  • Chemistry
1: Measurements in the Laboratory (Experiment)
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Chemistry is the study of matter. Our understanding of chemical processes thus depends on our ability to acquire accurate information about matter. Often, this information is quantitative, in the form of measurements. In this lab, you will be introduced to some common measuring devices, and learn how to use them to obtain correct measurements, each with correct precision. A metric ruler will be used to measure length in centimeters (cm).

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Textbook
Provider:
LibreTexts
Author:
Santa Monica College
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Advanced Chemical Experimentation and Instrumentation, Fall 2007
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Advanced experimentation, with particular emphasis on chemical synthesis and the fundamentals of quantum chemistry illustrated through molecular spectroscopy. Instruction and practice in the written and oral presentation of experimental results.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tokmakoff, Andrei
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
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Advanced Inorganic Chemistry is designed to give you the knowledge to explain everyday phenomena of inorganic complexes. The student will study the various aspects of their physical and chemical properties and learn how to determine the practical applications that these complexes can have in industrial, analytical, and medicinal chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain symmetry and point group theory and demonstrate knowledge of the mathematical method by which aspects of molecular symmetry can be determined; Use molecular symmetry to predict or explain the chemical properties of a molecule, such as dipole moment and allowed spectroscopic transitions; Construct simple molecular orbital diagrams and obtain bonding information from them; Demonstrate an understanding of valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR), which is used for predicting the shapes of individual molecules; Explain spectroscopic information obtained from coordination complexes; Identify the chemical and physical properties of transition metals; Demonstrate an understanding of transition metal organometallics; Define the role of catalysts and explain how they affect the activation energy and reaction rate of a chemical reaction; Identify the mechanisms of both ligand substitution and redox processes in transition metal complexes; Discuss some current, real-world applications of transition metal complexes in the fields of medicinal chemistry, solar energy, electronic displays, and ion batteries. (Chemistry 202)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Advanced Kitchen Chemistry, Spring 2002
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This seminar will be a scientific exploration of the food we eat and enjoy. Each week we shall have a scientific edible experiment that will explore a specific food topic. Topics include, but are not limited to, what makes a good experiment, cheese making, joys of tofu, food biochemistry, the science of spice, what is taste?

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Christie, Patricia
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Advanced Organic Chemistry
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Organic chemistry is the discipline that studies the properties and reactions of organic, carbon-based compounds. The student will begin by studying a unit on ylides, benzyne, and free radicals. Many free radicals affect life processes. For example, oxygen-derived radicals may be overproduced in cells, such as white blood cells that try to defend against infection in a living organism. Afterward the student will move into a comprehensive examination of stereochemistry, as well as the kinetics of substitution and elimination reactions. The course wraps up with a survey of various hetereocyclic structures, including their MO theory, aromaticity, and reactivity. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Describe free radicals in terms of stability, kinetics, and bond dissociation energies; Describe the stereochemistry and orbitals involved in photochemical reactions; Describe enantiomers, diastereomers, pro-S and pro-R hydrogens, and Re/Si faces of carbonyls; Perform conformational analysis of alkanes and cyclohexanes; Describe reaction mechanisms in terms of variousparameters (i.e.,kinetics, Curtin-Hammet principle, Hammond postulate,etc.); Describe the chemistry of the heterocycles listed in Unit3 in terms of molecular orbital theory, aromaticity, and reactions. (Chemistry 201)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Advanced Organic Chemistry, Spring 2007
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Application of structure and theory to the study of organic reaction mechanisms: stereochemical features including conformation and stereoelectronic effects; reaction dynamics, isotope effects and molecular orbital theory applied to pericyclic and photochemical reactions; and special reactive intermediates including carbenes, carbanions, and free radicals.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Movassaghi, Mohammad
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Advanced Seminar in Geology and Geochemistry: Organic Geochemistry, Fall 2005
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12.491 is a seminar focusing on problems of current interest in geology and geochemistry. For Fall 2005, the topic is organic geochemistry. Lectures and readings cover recent research in the development and properties of organic matter.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Atmospheric Science
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Summons, Roger
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Air Pollution [Liberal Arts: Math and Science/Natural Science]
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This assignment was designed for students in the pathways introductory chemistry class and the first year seminar and aligns with the Inquiry and Problem Solving core competency. In this context, there is a focus on framing the issues (identifies and/or addresses questions and problems), evidence gathering (assembles, reviews and synthesizes evidence from several diverse sources), evidence (analyze the data to address the questions posed) and conclusions (critical thinking, reflect on the outcomes, draw conclusions and generate new knowledge). There is also a Global Learning component based on comparing data collected locally with corresponding data from other locations or countries. The assignment includes the written communication ability with a focus on "Content Development and Organization," as well as the clarity of the communication and its purpose. The overall aim of this assignment is to enhance students' conceptual learning and understanding of key issues related to society as well as their course. This assignment was developed as part of a LaGuardia Global Learning mini-grant and CUNY Experiential Learning and Research in the Classroom mini-grants.
The assignment will be scaffolded over about 3 weeks and is worth about 10% of the final grade.
To further increase the success of this assignment, instructors might want to consider the following: Use class discussions to focus on the relevance and importance of conceptual learning. In order to improve the data analysis aspect, incorporating class demonstrations of how to conduct the analysis and guide discussions about what the data means. Giving students more detailed rubrics with formal expectations of the requirements of the assignments, particularly in the written format Find ways to increase student participation in class discussions.
When this assignment has been utilized in previous semesters, students clearly displayed the capability to relate the co-curricular experiences in the data collection and its analysis to concepts and ideas covered during class. Evidence for this came from very dynamic and interactive class discussions based on air pollution as well as from the output of the written assignment, in which students were able to relate the nature, sources and chemical properties of the pollutants to their impact on the environment, health and society in general.
LaGuardia's Core Competencies and Communication Abilities
List the Program Goal(s) that this assignment targets
Global Learning based on comparing pollutant levels around the LaGuardia campus with those in other locations or countries. It is also an IPS assignment, incorporating scientific literacy and thinking, as students need to analyze the data, interpret it and reflect on the outcomes.
List the Student Learning Objective(s) that this assignment targets
Identify and apply fundamental chemical concepts and methods. Gather, analyze, and interpret data.
List the Course Objectives(s) that this assignment targets
Explore the complex connections between chemistry and society. Apply chemical principles to real world issues, including ethical aspects. Gather, analyze, and interpret data.
Write a short description of the pedagogy involved in executing this assignment
Students collect and analyze the data, interpret the results in terms of pollution levels, safety and ethics and compare with EPA standard levels and with levels in other countries.
Outside the classroom events will be organized for data collection. There will be class and group-based discussions focused on the data, its analysis and the connections to society.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Biology
Statistics and Probability
Chemistry
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
LaGuardia Community College
Author:
Alberts, Ian
Date Added:
10/01/2018
Alternative Fuels from Biomass Sources
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Is climate change real? Yes, it is! And technologies to reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions are being developed. One type of technology that is imperative in the short run is biofuels; however, biofuels must meet specifications for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, or catastrophic damage could occur. This course will examine the chemistry of technologies of bio-based sources for power generation and transportation fuels. We'll consider various biomasses that can be utilized for fuel generation, understand the processes necessary for biomass processing, explore biorefining, and analyze how biofuels can be used in current fuel infrastructure.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Caroline Clifford
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Analysis of Biological Networks (BE.440), Fall 2004
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This class analyzes complex biological processes from the molecular, cellular, extracellular, and organ levels of hierarchy. Emphasis is placed on the basic biochemical and biophysical principles that govern these processes. Examples of processes to be studied include chemotaxis, the fixation of nitrogen into organic biological molecules, growth factor and hormone mediated signaling cascades, and signaling cascades leading to cell death in response to DNA damage. In each case, the availability of a resource, or the presence of a stimulus, results in some biochemical pathways being turned on while others are turned off. The course examines the dynamic aspects of these processes and details how biochemical mechanistic themes impinge on molecular/cellular/tissue/organ-level functions. Chemical and quantitative views of the interplay of multiple pathways as biological networks are emphasized. Student work will culminate in the preparation of a unique grant application in an area of biological networks.

Subject:
Biology
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Essigmann, John
Sasisekharan, Ram
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Analytical Chemistry
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Analytical chemistry is the branch of chemistry dealing with measurement, both qualitative and quantitative. This discipline is also concerned with the chemical composition of samples. In the field, analytical chemistry is applied when detecting the presence and determining the quantities of chemical compounds, such as lead in water samples or arsenic in tissue samples. It also encompasses many different spectrochemical techniques, all of which are used under various experimental conditions. This branch of chemistry teaches the general theories behind the use of each instrument as well analysis of experimental data. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Demonstrate a mastery of various methods of expressing concentration; Use a linear calibration curve to calculate concentration; Describe the various spectrochemical techniques as described within the course; Use sample data obtained from spectrochemical techniques to calculate unknown concentrations or obtain structural information where applicable; Describe the various chromatographies described within this course and analyze a given chromatogram; Demonstrate an understanding of electrochemistry and the methods used to study the response of an electrolyte through current of potential. (Chemistry 108)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Analytical Chemistry
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Analytical chemistry spans nearly all areas of chemistry but involves the development of tools and methods to measure physical properties of substances and apply those techniques to the identification of their presence (qualitative analysis) and quantify the amount present (quantitative analysis) of species in a wide variety of settings.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
U.C. Davis
Provider Set:
ChemWiki
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Analytical Chemistry 2.0
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Analytical chemistry is more than a collection of analytical methods and an understanding of equilibrium chemistry; it is an approach to solving chemical problems. Although equilibrium chemistry and analytical methods are important, their coverage should not come at the expense of other equally important topics. The introductory course in analytical chemistry is the ideal place in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum for exploring topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, optimization, statistics, and the validation of experimental results. Analytical methods come and go, but best practices for designing and validating analytical methods are universal. Because chemistry is an experimental science it is essential that all chemistry students understand the importance of making good measurements.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
David Harvey
Date Added:
10/28/2014
Analytical Chemistry 2.1
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As currently taught in the United States, introductory courses in analytical chemistryemphasize quantitative (and sometimes qualitative) methods of analysis along with a heavydose of equilibrium chemistry. Analytical chemistry, however, is much more than a collection ofanalytical methods and an understanding of equilibrium chemistry; it is an approach to solvingchemical problems. Although equilibrium chemistry and analytical methods are important, theircoverage should not come at the expense of other equally important topics.

The introductory course in analytical chemistry is the ideal place in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum forexploring topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization,optimization, statistics, and the validation of experimental results. Analytical methods comeand go, but best practices for designing and validating analytical methods are universal. Becausechemistry is an experimental science it is essential that all chemistry students understand theimportance of making good measurements.

My goal in preparing this textbook is to find a more appropriate balance between theoryand practice, between “classical” and “modern” analytical methods, between analyzing samplesand collecting samples and preparing them for analysis, and between analytical methods anddata analysis. There is more material here than anyone can cover in one semester; it is myhope that the diversity of topics will meet the needs of different instructors, while, perhaps,suggesting some new topics to cover.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
DePauw University
Author:
David Harvey
Date Added:
06/20/2016
Aquatic Chemistry, Fall 2005
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This course details the quantitative treatment of chemical processes in aquatic systems such as lakes, oceans, rivers, estuaries, groundwaters, and wastewaters. It includes a brief review of chemical thermodynamics that is followed by discussion of acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, coordination, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Emphasis is on equilibrium calculations as a tool for understanding the variables that govern the chemical composition of aquatic systems and the fate of inorganic pollutants.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Moffett, Jim
Seewald, Jeff
Tivey, Meg
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry, Spring 2006
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This course provides an introduction to the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, including experience with computer codes. It is intended for undergraduates and first year graduate students.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mcrae, Gregory
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Atomic Theory #1: Principles and Laws
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Atomic Theory #2: Structures and Symbols
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Atomic Theory #3: Evolution of Atomic Theory History and Experiments
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Atomic Theory #4: Periodic Table
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019