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AFN 121 Yoruba Tradition and Culture
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A class presentation as part of the discussion on West Africa about the instructor’s Yoruba Heritage, Research, Tradition and Culture in the AFN 121 course: History of African Civilizations on April 20, 2021.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Religious Studies
History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Alapo, Remi
Date Added:
04/01/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Carroll)
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An introduction to the history of art, emphasizing visual literacy in an historical context. Major works of art and architecture, drawn from a wide range of world cultures and periods from ancient times to the present, will be explored.

Students will learn to analyze works of art critically from both an historical and an interpretative point of view; in addition, they will gain an understanding of the importance of cultural diversity through exposure to the arts of many different times and places.
Students will have extensive practice in articulating aesthetic judgments effectively in spoken and written form.
Students will learn how to draw upon the cultural riches of New York City to enhance their learning within and outside the classroom.
Identify unique characteristics of several artistic traditions, and recognize and analyze the differences among the major periods, artists, genres, and theories of art.
Use terms of art historical analysis correctly and be able to apply them to unfamiliar works.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Reading
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Anna Carroll
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 3094/7024G-Postwar Art: From World War II to 1989
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Home OER for Mona Hadler's ART3094-Postwar Art: From World War II to 1989. Twentieth-century art from World War II to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Major movements include Abstract Expressionism, Fluxus and performance, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Postmodernism. Major artists include Pollock, Rauschenberg, Hesse, Serra, Richter, Warhol, Sherman. Issues of gender, race and politics are integrated into the entire curriculum. For document passwords, please contact Mona Hadler or the Brooklyn College Library.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Emily Fairey
Mona Hadler
Date Added:
12/08/2020
Accessibility: the Whys and the Hows
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This presentation introduces Computer Science students to the notion of accessibility: developing software for people with disabilities. This lesson provides a discussion of why accessibility is important (including the legal, societal and ethical benefits) as well as an overview of different types of impairments (visual, auditory, motor, neurological/cognitive) and how developers can make their software accessible to users with those disabilities. This lesson includes videos and links to readings and tutorials for students.

Subject:
Computer Science
Education
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Kletenik, Devorah
Date Added:
01/01/2020
Advanced Mechatronics
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Project-based course on the design of mechatronic devices to address needs identified by hospital-based clinicians and industry. Students work in teams to develop a mechatronic prototype. The lectures will cover the design of medical devices and robotics including sensors, actuators, and robots. The students will communicate with customers to understand design needs, then conduct study on prior art, intellectual property, due diligence, and idea conceptualization. Students will present ideas in class and to a broad audience from local industry. Students will also write a publication-quality final report, which they will be encouraged for publication submission.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Manufacturing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College
Author:
Su, Hao
Date Added:
04/01/2020
African-American Literature
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This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary production of African American authors from the Colonial period to the current day, examining the cultural, historical, and political contexts of the literature, as well as how the issues of gender, race, and class affect the production and meaning of these works. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the cultural influences and the development of African American literature; analyze the evolution of African American literature from an oral to a literary tradition; define the functions of African American literature from its inception in the period of slavery to the contemporary period; identify the major authors and/or literary works in the various literary periods and movements (Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism, and modernism; Black Arts; and the Contemporary Period). This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 411)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
African Politics
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This course will provide the student with a broad overview of African politics placed within the context of Africa's recent history, taking into account Africa's colonial relationships and then the post-colonial period. This course will analyze on the internal workings and challenges of African states, including their movements towards democratization, their economic statuses, the connections between their governmental and non-governmental institutions/organizations, and the various ways in which their societies and cultures impact their politics. This course also asks questions about the nature of Africa's conflicts, reviewing larger trends within Africa's political economy, and inquiring about the promise of continental and sub-continental political integration efforts. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how colonialism and independence movements contributed to and shaped contemporary African statehood; identify the main causes of state and political failure in Africa; define underdevelopment and explain the causes of economic failure in Africa; discuss the causes of civil and interstate conflict in Africa; apply knowledge of Africa's history to explain current causes of crisis and the roles of different actors within the state and international community; compare and contrast economically and politically stable states with those that are unstable and identify the main features of stability; identify and explain some of the major social, cultural, and economic challenges (such as HIV/AIDS) that contemporary African states face, as well as the role international actors play in addressing these challenges. (Political Science 325)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Ai Weiwei's "Remembering" and the Politics of Dissent
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All art is political in the sense that all art takes place in the public arena and engages with an already existing ideology. Chinese artist, Ai Weiwei, offers an important contemporary example. The news that Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has been detained by authorities has prompted significant concern. Ai Weiwei has ben arrested by the Chinese authorities.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Albrecht Dürer, Self-Portrait (1500)
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In this art history video discussion Beth Harris and Steven Zucker look at Albrecht Durer's "Self-Portrait, 1500." (Alte Pinakothek, Munich).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris Ph.D.
Steven Zucker Ph.D.
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Alexander Mosaic
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This art history video examines the "Alexander Mosaic" c. 100 B.C.E., tessera mosaic from the House of the Faun, Pompeii. This Roman floor mosaic may be based on a lost Hellenistic painting by Philoxenos of Eretria, The Battle of Issus, c. 315 B.C.E.). Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Algebra2Go - Prealgebra
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Prepare yourself to take an Algebra course with the Algebra2go䋢 prealgebra resources page. Whether you are attending Saddleback College's prealgebra class (math 351), taking a prealgebra class at another school, or need to refresh your math skills for a business or science class, Professor Perez and his favorite student Charlie have the tools that can help you. We have five primary types of study materials: class notes, video worksheets, video lectures, practice problems, and practice quizzes. For some topics we have some additional tools to assist you.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Algebra2go:  Decimals
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Part of the course for community college students featuring Professor Perez and his student Charlie, teaching about decimal concepts and operations.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Algebra2go- PreAlgebra - Intro to Subtraction
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This course is for community college students featuring Professor Perez and his student Charlie. This lesson demonstrates subtraction, including when the answer is negative, on the number line.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Algebra2go: Pre-algebra Conversions
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This is part of the course for community college students featuring Professor Perez and his student Charlie, teaching how to make conversions between different kinds of units.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Lecture
Unit of Study
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Allston's Elijah in the Desert
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This art history video discussion examines Washington Allston's "Elijah in the Desert", 1818, oil on canvas, 125.09 x 184.78 cm / 49 1/4 x 72 3/4 inches (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Altdorfer's The Battle of Issus
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In this art history video discussion Beth Harris and Steven Zucker examine Albrecht Altdorfer's "The Battle of Issus," 1529, oil on panel. Alte Pinokothek, Munich.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris and Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Ambrogio Lorenzetti's Palazzo Pubblico Frescos: Allegory and Effect of Good and Bad Government
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In this art history video discussion Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker consider Ambrogio Lorenzetti's series of frescos "Allegory of Good Government", "Effects of Good Government in the City and the Country", and "Allegory and Effects of Bad Government in the City and the Country" Siena c. 1337-40. Sala della Pace (Hall of Peace) also known as the Sala dei Nove (the Hall of the Nine), Palazzo Pubblico, Siena.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris and Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
American Art
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This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. The student will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Understand the historical (geographic, political) formation of the present United States of America; Be familiar with renowned influential American artists from the 18th through the 20th century; Be conversant in common stylistic designations used in Western art of the 17th through 20th centuries; Recognize subjects and forms in American art through history that mark its distinction; Be able to engage specific images, objects, and structures from different critical perspectives to consider their functions and meanings. (Art History 210)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
American Political Thought
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This course will cover American political thought from the nation's founding through the 1960s, exploring the political theories that have shaped its governance. As there is no one philosopher or idea that represents the totality of American political thought, the student will survey the writings and speeches of those who have had the greatest impact over this period of time. Much of the study required in this course is based on the original texts and speeches of those who influenced political thought throughout American history. The student will learn and understand the impact that their views and actions have had on the modern American state. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the religious and political origins of the American political system; explain how Enlightenment thinkers, such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Baron de Montesquieu, influenced the political philosophies of American founding fathers; analyze how the colonial American experience shaped many of the core values represented in American government and expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution; compare and contrast the differing opinions on the role of the government that the founders expressed; trace the development and evolution of the concepts of 'states rights' and 'federal (national) supremacy'; connect the observations of De Tocqueville in Democracy in America to the concepts of equality, individuality, and civic engagement in American political discourse; examine the evolution of race in the American political system (from slavery to the 2008 election of Barack Obama); discuss the changes in the political role of women in America from its colonial days to the present; connect the concept of 'American Exceptionalism' to the industrial revolution, capitalism, and imperialism; analyze the roots of reform in the Progressive Era and their impact on modern political discourse; explain major principles of American foreign relations over time; assess the purpose and impact of ĺÎĺĺĺŤAmerican war rhetoricĄ_ĺĺö over time; differentiate between 'liberal' and 'conservative' political beliefs in modern American government; illustrate how the political turmoil in the 1960s greatly shaped contemporary American political discourse; evaluate the current political discourse as represented in the 2008 and 2010 elections. (Political Science 301)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Ancient Civilizations of the World
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In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Andrea Mantegna, Camera Degli Sposi
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This art history video discussion examines Andrea Mantegna's "Camera degli Sposi" (Frescos in the ducal palace, Mantua), 1465-74.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
David Drogin
Date Added:
03/01/2019
The Anthropocene, Overview
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This presentation offers an overview of the developing concept of The Anthropocene -- a term coined to describe our current geological epoch, in which human impact on the planet will leave a permanent trace.

Subject:
Environmental Studies
Physical Geography
Social Science
Anthropology
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
schwartz, scott w
Date Added:
05/11/2017
Antoine or Louis Le Nain, Peasant Family in an Interior
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This art history video discussion examines Antoine or Louis Le Nain's "Peasant Family in an Interior", 2nd quarter of the 17th century, oil on canvas (Musee du Louvre, Paris).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Apollonius, Boxer at Rest, c. 100 B.C.E.
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This art history video discussion examines Apollonius' "Boxer at Rest", c. 100 B.C.E., bronze, Palazzo Massimo, Museo Nazionale Romano, Rome.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Valentina Follo
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Approaching Shakespeare Lecture Series
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Each lecture in this series focuses on a single play by Shakespeare, and employs a range of different approaches to try to understand a central critical question about it. Rather than providing overarching readings or interpretations, the series aims to show the variety of different ways we might understand Shakespeare, the kinds of evidence that might be used to strengthen our critical analysis, and, above all, the enjoyable and unavoidable fact that Shakespeare's plays tend to generate our questions rather than answer them.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Emma Smith
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Arch of Titus
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This art history video discussion examines the Arch of Titus, originally Pentelic marble, early 19h-century restoration is in travertine, c. 81 C.E. (Via Sacra, Rome).

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Art Appreciation and Techniques
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Rating

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. It is the only resource I have found that approximates techniques, media, and an overview of different processes that is usually the first half of a printed text on art appreciation or an introduction to art. This is geared toward an undergraduate, lower-level student population. The art history survey is inadequate, but combined with another source, like Boundless' art history, this can be a complete text for an Art 100 course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Module
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Afshan Bokhari
Amy Gansell
Andrew E. Hershberger
Andrew Marvick
Anne Bertrand-Dewsnap
Denise Rogers
Hilda Werschkul
Jelena Bogdanovic
Jennifer Palinkas
Jill Kiefer
Lynn E. Roller
Marjorie Munsterberg
Michelle Greet
Shaoqian Zhang
Tracy Musacchio
William V. Ganis
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Art Historical Methodologies
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This course is an introduction to the major methodologies used by art historians. Although not a history of art history per se, it is organized in a roughly chronological order that traces major methodological developments within the discipline from the birth of art history in the nineteenth century through the late twentieth century. The course will also examine how artworks are displayed in modern art museums. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain what art historians study and what kinds of questions they ask about works of art; Identify major art historical methodologies and their associated theories and theorists; Write a critical summary of a piece of art historical scholarship; Explain the major aspects of the methodological approaches outlined in this course and how they relate to the philosophical, historical, and social context in which they first appeared; Explain how different methodologies can be used to analyze works of art; Compare and contrast major art historical methodologies; Use different art historical approaches to interpret, analyze, and write about works of art. (Art History 301)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Art in Nazi Germany
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In this art history video Beth Harris and Steven Zucker discuss Paul Troost's House of (German) Art (1933-37) in relation to the Great Exhibition of German Art and the Entartete Kunst (Degenerate Art) Exhibitions of 1937 in Munich.

The House of German Art now exhibits international contemporary art in direct opposition to original National Socialist intent.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris and Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Art of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East
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This course serves as an introduction to the major artistic and architectural traditions of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East. This course will explore how artifacts and monuments can be used to study the history and culture of the ancient world. It is divided into two units that chronologically focus on the art, architecture, and archaeology of each region. The first unit examines Ancient Egyptian tombs, monuments, and art from the Early Dynastic (c. 3100-2650 BCE) through the Roman (30 BCE- 4thcentury CE) periods. The second unit focuses on Ancient Near Eastern artistic and architectural traditions from the late Neolithic (c. 9500-4500 BCE) through the conquest of the Achaemenid Persian Empire (550-330 BCE) by Alexander the Great. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify major ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern architectural sites, monuments, and works of art; Identify the general characteristics of ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern art and recognize the names and characteristics of the major art historical time periods of each region; Describe how art and architecture can be used to understand the politics, history, and culture of Ancient Egypt and the Near East; Explain ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern cosmology, conceptions of the afterlife, and kingship, as well as their relationship to architectural sites, monuments, and works of art. (Art History 201)

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Art of Ancient Greece and Rome
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Rating

In this course, the student will study the art of Classical Antiquity. The different units of the course reflect the main chronological stages in art development in Ancient Greece and Rome, from the coming together of the Greek city-state and the emergence of ĺÎĺĺĺŤgeometric art (around 900 B.C.) to the fourth century A.D. shift that took place within Roman culture and art due to the growing influence of Christianity. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain why ancient Greek and Roman art can be studied together as ĺÎĺĺĺŤthe art of Classical Antiquity; Trace the timeline of major events in Ancient Greece and Rome; Link important developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome to specific geographical contexts; Explain how important historical developments and social-historical contexts had an impact on artĺÎĺĺÎĺs evolution in Ancient Greece and Rome; Identify the important stylistic and technical developments of Ancient Greek and Roman art; Discuss important artworks, presenting relevant information on each workĺÎĺĺÎĺs historical context and constitution; Discuss important artists in terms of the style of their work. (Art History 202)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Art of the Islamic World
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This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. It surveys core Islamic beliefs, the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture, and art and architecture created under each dynasty and ruling party. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Islam, the major characteristics of Islamic art, and the major forms of Islamic architecture; identify major pre-modern Islamic works of art and monuments from the Middle East, Northern Africa, Spain, and South Asia; explain how the core beliefs of Islam contributed to the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture and the secular art works and architecture of the Islamic world; identify the succeeding dynasties that ruled the Islamic world; explain the important role that the patronage of art and architecture had played in definitions of kingship. (Art History 303)

Subject:
Art History
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Arts of Asia
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This course serves as an introduction to the major pre-Modern artistic traditions of India, China, and Japan. It first examines Indian Art, focusing on Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic art and architecture. Then, the student will cover the arts of China, detailing the interaction between art, politics, and culture throughout Chinese dynastic history. Lastly, the course discusses Japanese Art, exploring the effects that various sub-traditions and sub-cultures had on the art of Japan. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify major pre-modern Indian, Chinese, and Japanese works of art and architecture; identify the major art historical time periods in India, China, and Japan and the important artistic developments that occurred during each of them; recognize how art and architecture can be used to understand the politics, history, and culture of India, China, and Japan; look at, analyze, and compare and contrast different types of Asian art. (Art History 305)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Asia-Pacific Politics
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This course will introduce the student to the international relations of the Asia-Pacific region. Globalization, economic ties, national security issues, and politico-military alliances with the U.S. make an understanding of this region important to any political science student or participant in American government. This course will examine the differences between Western political thought and the general philosophical outlooks of the Asian population, which have been molded by societal forces for thousands of years. It will also address politics in Asia by examining pre-colonial systems of government, Western imperialism, national liberation movements, and proxy wars fought by the Superpowers in the Cold War. This course is important because the Asia-Pacific has given rise to several of the U.S.'s major security concerns: financial support of the U.S. economy by China and Japan through the purchase of U.S. government debt securities, conflict with China over Taiwan, North Korea's nuclear weapons program, separatist movements in several of the smaller Pacific Rim nations, and the growth and support of transnational terrorism within the region. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how religion and culture impact government and political systems in Eastern Asia; discuss philosophies of government in Eastern Asia from ancient times to the present; identify the ways in which Western imperialism has impacted Eastern Asia; demonstrate an understanding of systems of governance currently in existence in Eastern Asia; analyze contemporary political and security issues in Eastern Asia that may impact U.S. national interests; assess the relationship that exists between economic development, systems of governance, and political stability of a Third World nation. (Political Science 322)

Subject:
Philosophy
World Cultures
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Atomic Theory #1: Principles and Laws
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Atomic Theory #2: Structures and Symbols
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Atomic Theory #3: Evolution of Atomic Theory History and Experiments
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Atomic Theory #4: Periodic Table
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Atomic Theory #5: Molecules and Compounds
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Atomic Theory #6: Ionic Compounds
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Video lectures on atomic theory incorporating a simulated student class working problems to increase accessibility and relatablility.
Open Educational Resource funded by a City University of New York OER Grant. Produced by the Department of Chemistry, York College/CUNY and the Department of Natural Sciences, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
York College
Author:
Chang, Emmanuel J.
Mark, Kevin J.
Date Added:
01/01/2019
August Sander's Portraits
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This art history video discussion examines these portraits by August Sander: "Pastry Cook", gelatin silver print, 1928, "Secretary at a Radio Station", Cologne, gelatin silver print, c. 1931, and "Disabled Man", gelatin silver print, 1926.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Juliana Kreinik
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
BUSN 3400: Introduction to Economics and Business Statistics
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This open education resource (OER) contains course materials for a full semester course in Statistics. These course materials were developed by Professors Linda Weiser Friedman (Baruch College, CUNY) and Hershey H. Friedman (Brooklyn College, CUNY).

Subject:
Business and Communication
Statistics and Probability
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Module
Syllabus
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Hershey Friedman
Linda Weiser Friedman
Date Added:
06/18/2020
The Balance of Payments, Exchange Rates and Aggregate Expenditure
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This lecture examines the effects of the economy‰Ûªs openness on macroeconomic policy. The three main topics covered in this lecture are: the effect of exports and imports on the Gross Domestic Product; the workings of a foreign exchange market; and the effects of exchange rates on the economy.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Nunez-Torres, Alexander
Date Added:
04/01/2018
Barberini Faun, c. 220 B.C.E.
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In this art history video discussion Beth Harris and Steven Zucker consider the Barberini Faun, c. 220 B.C.E. (Glyptothek, Munich).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris and Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Barnett Newman's Painting Technique
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This art history video looks at "The Painting Techniques of Barnett Newman: Vir Heroicus Sublimis" Abstract Expressionist New York, The Museum of Modern Art, October 3, 2--April 11, 2011. Filmed by Plowshares Media; Music by Chris Parrello, Ian Young, Kevin Thomas, Ziv Ravitz.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Baroque Art in Holland Vermeer's Young Woman with a Water Pitcher
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This art history video discussion looks at Johannes Vermeer's "Young Woman with a Water Pitcher", oil on canvas, c. 1662 (Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Baroque Art to Neoclassicism
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This course will examine the history of Western art from approximately 1600 to approximately 1800 period that bridges the gap from the Renaissance to the earliest days of the Modern era. Beginning with the Baroque in Counter-Reformation Italy and concluding with Neoclassicism in the late 18th century, the student will trace the stylistic developments in Europe and America through a variety of religious, political, and philosophical movements. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify works of art from the Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, and Neoclassical periods and be able to distinguish between these different periods; Discuss and identify the oeuvre of the major artists working in Western Europe from 1600-1800; Explain and identify the regional and cultural differences between works of art produced in the same period (i.e., Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, or Neoclassical); Recognize important works of art from the Baroque through Neoclassical periods, recalling such information as date of creation, artist, patron (if known), medium, and period; Recognize the features (stylistic and iconographic) typical of each period studied; Explain and discuss the general arc of Western history from approximately 1600-1800, as seen through the lens of the arts; Explain the forces influencing the change in style and subject matter in Western art from 1600-1800; Discuss the sources of influence (from previous historical periods as well as from neighboring geographical regions) that affected art produced from the Baroque to Neoclassical periods; Compare and contrast works of art from the Baroque through Neoclassical periods to those of other periods and cultures; Describe the methods and materials used to create works of art from the Baroque to Neoclassical periods; Explain the ways in which Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, and Neoclassical art reveal the social, religious, and political mores of their respective times and places. (Art History 207)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Bed, Bank and Shoreline Protection
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Design of shoreline protection along rivers, canals and the sea; load on bed and shoreline by currents, wind waves and ship motion; stability of elements under current and wave conditions; stability of shore protection elements; design methods, construction methods. Flow: recapitulation of basics from fluid mechanics (flow, turbulence), stability of individual grains (sand, but also rock) in different type of flow conditions (weirs, jets), scour and erosion. Porous Media: basic equation, pressures and velocities on the stability on the boundary layer; groundwater flow with impermeable and semi-impermeable structures; granular filters and geotextiles. Waves: recapitulation of the basics of waves, focus on wave forces on the land-water boundary, specific aspects of ship induced waves, stability of elements under wave action (loose rock, placed blocks, impermeable layers) Design: overview of the various types of protections, construction and maintenance; design requirements, deterministic and probabilistic design; case studies, examples Materials and environment: overview of materials to be used, interaction with the aquatic environment, role of the land-water boundary as part of the ecosystem; environmentally sound shoreline design.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ir. H.J. Verhagen
Date Added:
02/22/2016
Beginning Algebra (BPCC Open Campus: Math 098)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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In this beginning algebra course, you'll learn about fundamental operations on real numbers, exponents, solving linear equations and inequalities, applications, functions, graphing linear equations, slope, and systems of linear equations. This course was created by Bossier Parish Community College as part of its MOOC series "Open Campus." NOTE: Open Campus courses are non-credit reviews and tutorials and cannot be used to satisfy requirements in any curriculum at BPCC. (Beginning Algebra Course by Bossier Parish Community College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://bpcc.edu/opencampus/index.html.)

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Bossier Parish Community College
Author:
Gail Hendrix
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Bellini's St. Francis
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This art history video discussion examines Giovanni Bellini's "Saint Francis in the Desert", c. 1480, oil and tempera on poplar, 124.5 x 141.9 cm (The Frick Collection, New York).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Bellini's and Titian's The Feast of the Gods
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This art history video discussion looks at Giovanni Bellini and Titian, The Feast of the Gods, 1514 and 1529, oil on canvas (National Gallery of Art).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Berlinghieri's St. Francis Altarpiece
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This art history video discussion looks at Bonaventura Berlinghieri's "Altarpiece of St. Francis", c. 1235 (Church of San Francesco, Pescia, Italy).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
03/01/2019