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ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Carroll)
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An introduction to the history of art, emphasizing visual literacy in an historical context. Major works of art and architecture, drawn from a wide range of world cultures and periods from ancient times to the present, will be explored.

Students will learn to analyze works of art critically from both an historical and an interpretative point of view; in addition, they will gain an understanding of the importance of cultural diversity through exposure to the arts of many different times and places.
Students will have extensive practice in articulating aesthetic judgments effectively in spoken and written form.
Students will learn how to draw upon the cultural riches of New York City to enhance their learning within and outside the classroom.
Identify unique characteristics of several artistic traditions, and recognize and analyze the differences among the major periods, artists, genres, and theories of art.
Use terms of art historical analysis correctly and be able to apply them to unfamiliar works.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Reading
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Anna Carroll
Date Added:
03/10/2021
ART 1010 Art: Its History and Meaning (Greenberg)
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An introduction to the study of art and its history from ancient times to the present. In this course, we will study the history of Western art, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of contemporary times.

The information presented in this course will provide you with the tools to recognize important works of art and historical styles, as well as to understand the historical context and cultural developments of Western art history through the end of the modern period. Introductory readings paired with detailed lectures will provide you with a well-rounded sense of the history, art, and culture of the West up through modern times.

At the end of this course, you will be able to identify key works of art and artistic periods in Western history. You will also be able to discuss the development of stylistic movements and relate those developments to important historical events.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Natalie Greenberg
Date Added:
03/10/2021
AUTO-2440 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Power Management
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This three credit course offered at Macomb Community College discusses the practical application of hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) power management systems. Areas of study include computer controls of the internal combustion engine (ICE), battery types, HEV thermal management, motors, safety, and HEV/EV accessories. System types, service procedures, and diagnostic procedures are covered for Ford, General Motors, Honda, and Lexus/Toyota vehicles. Included educational materials for this course are homework, sample exams and quizzes, labs, lesson plans, pre-assessment, and syllabus. Solutions are not provided with any materials. If you're an instructor and would like complete exams, quizzes, or solutions, please contact theCAAT. This course is composed of six modules that can be used to supplement existing courses or taught together as a complete course. These modules are Intro to HEVs,Honda HEVs, Toyota HEVs,Ford HEVs, GM HEVs, and Fuel Cells

Subject:
Automotive Technology and Repair
Education
Physics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Center for Automotive Technology - Macomb
Provider Set:
Center for Advanced Automotive Technology
Author:
Macomb Community College
Date Added:
09/27/2012
African Politics
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CC BY
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This course will provide the student with a broad overview of African politics placed within the context of Africa's recent history, taking into account Africa's colonial relationships and then the post-colonial period. This course will analyze on the internal workings and challenges of African states, including their movements towards democratization, their economic statuses, the connections between their governmental and non-governmental institutions/organizations, and the various ways in which their societies and cultures impact their politics. This course also asks questions about the nature of Africa's conflicts, reviewing larger trends within Africa's political economy, and inquiring about the promise of continental and sub-continental political integration efforts. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how colonialism and independence movements contributed to and shaped contemporary African statehood; identify the main causes of state and political failure in Africa; define underdevelopment and explain the causes of economic failure in Africa; discuss the causes of civil and interstate conflict in Africa; apply knowledge of Africa's history to explain current causes of crisis and the roles of different actors within the state and international community; compare and contrast economically and politically stable states with those that are unstable and identify the main features of stability; identify and explain some of the major social, cultural, and economic challenges (such as HIV/AIDS) that contemporary African states face, as well as the role international actors play in addressing these challenges. (Political Science 325)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
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CC BY
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Algebra2Go - Prealgebra
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Prepare yourself to take an Algebra course with the Algebra2go䋢 prealgebra resources page. Whether you are attending Saddleback College's prealgebra class (math 351), taking a prealgebra class at another school, or need to refresh your math skills for a business or science class, Professor Perez and his favorite student Charlie have the tools that can help you. We have five primary types of study materials: class notes, video worksheets, video lectures, practice problems, and practice quizzes. For some topics we have some additional tools to assist you.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Algebra2go- PreAlgebra - Intro to Subtraction
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CC BY-SA
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This course is for community college students featuring Professor Perez and his student Charlie. This lesson demonstrates subtraction, including when the answer is negative, on the number line.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
03/04/2019
American Political Thought
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course will cover American political thought from the nation's founding through the 1960s, exploring the political theories that have shaped its governance. As there is no one philosopher or idea that represents the totality of American political thought, the student will survey the writings and speeches of those who have had the greatest impact over this period of time. Much of the study required in this course is based on the original texts and speeches of those who influenced political thought throughout American history. The student will learn and understand the impact that their views and actions have had on the modern American state. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the religious and political origins of the American political system; explain how Enlightenment thinkers, such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Baron de Montesquieu, influenced the political philosophies of American founding fathers; analyze how the colonial American experience shaped many of the core values represented in American government and expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution; compare and contrast the differing opinions on the role of the government that the founders expressed; trace the development and evolution of the concepts of 'states rights' and 'federal (national) supremacy'; connect the observations of De Tocqueville in Democracy in America to the concepts of equality, individuality, and civic engagement in American political discourse; examine the evolution of race in the American political system (from slavery to the 2008 election of Barack Obama); discuss the changes in the political role of women in America from its colonial days to the present; connect the concept of 'American Exceptionalism' to the industrial revolution, capitalism, and imperialism; analyze the roots of reform in the Progressive Era and their impact on modern political discourse; explain major principles of American foreign relations over time; assess the purpose and impact of ĺÎĺĺĺŤAmerican war rhetoricĄ_ĺĺö over time; differentiate between 'liberal' and 'conservative' political beliefs in modern American government; illustrate how the political turmoil in the 1960s greatly shaped contemporary American political discourse; evaluate the current political discourse as represented in the 2008 and 2010 elections. (Political Science 301)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Art of the Islamic World
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CC BY
Rating

This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. It surveys core Islamic beliefs, the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture, and art and architecture created under each dynasty and ruling party. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Islam, the major characteristics of Islamic art, and the major forms of Islamic architecture; identify major pre-modern Islamic works of art and monuments from the Middle East, Northern Africa, Spain, and South Asia; explain how the core beliefs of Islam contributed to the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture and the secular art works and architecture of the Islamic world; identify the succeeding dynasties that ruled the Islamic world; explain the important role that the patronage of art and architecture had played in definitions of kingship. (Art History 303)

Subject:
Art History
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Arts of Asia
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CC BY
Rating

This course serves as an introduction to the major pre-Modern artistic traditions of India, China, and Japan. It first examines Indian Art, focusing on Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic art and architecture. Then, the student will cover the arts of China, detailing the interaction between art, politics, and culture throughout Chinese dynastic history. Lastly, the course discusses Japanese Art, exploring the effects that various sub-traditions and sub-cultures had on the art of Japan. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify major pre-modern Indian, Chinese, and Japanese works of art and architecture; identify the major art historical time periods in India, China, and Japan and the important artistic developments that occurred during each of them; recognize how art and architecture can be used to understand the politics, history, and culture of India, China, and Japan; look at, analyze, and compare and contrast different types of Asian art. (Art History 305)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Asia-Pacific Politics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the international relations of the Asia-Pacific region. Globalization, economic ties, national security issues, and politico-military alliances with the U.S. make an understanding of this region important to any political science student or participant in American government. This course will examine the differences between Western political thought and the general philosophical outlooks of the Asian population, which have been molded by societal forces for thousands of years. It will also address politics in Asia by examining pre-colonial systems of government, Western imperialism, national liberation movements, and proxy wars fought by the Superpowers in the Cold War. This course is important because the Asia-Pacific has given rise to several of the U.S.'s major security concerns: financial support of the U.S. economy by China and Japan through the purchase of U.S. government debt securities, conflict with China over Taiwan, North Korea's nuclear weapons program, separatist movements in several of the smaller Pacific Rim nations, and the growth and support of transnational terrorism within the region. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how religion and culture impact government and political systems in Eastern Asia; discuss philosophies of government in Eastern Asia from ancient times to the present; identify the ways in which Western imperialism has impacted Eastern Asia; demonstrate an understanding of systems of governance currently in existence in Eastern Asia; analyze contemporary political and security issues in Eastern Asia that may impact U.S. national interests; assess the relationship that exists between economic development, systems of governance, and political stability of a Third World nation. (Political Science 322)

Subject:
Philosophy
World Cultures
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
BIO 3004 Videos Research Experiences in Microbiomes Network (REMNet)
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Welcome to the Research Experiences in Microbiomes Network (REMNet) videos for Biology 3004. Here you will learn how you can incorporate next-generation microbiome sequencing into your biology course curriculum.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
REMNet (Research Experiences in Microbiomes Network)
Date Added:
03/09/2020
BUSN 3400: Introduction to Economics and Business Statistics
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This open education resource (OER) contains course materials for a full semester course in Statistics. These course materials were developed by Professors Linda Weiser Friedman (Baruch College, CUNY) and Hershey H. Friedman (Brooklyn College, CUNY).

Subject:
Business and Communication
Statistics and Probability
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Module
Syllabus
Tutorial
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Hershey Friedman
Linda Weiser Friedman
Date Added:
06/18/2020
Beginning Algebra (BPCC Open Campus: Math 098)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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In this beginning algebra course, you'll learn about fundamental operations on real numbers, exponents, solving linear equations and inequalities, applications, functions, graphing linear equations, slope, and systems of linear equations. This course was created by Bossier Parish Community College as part of its MOOC series "Open Campus." NOTE: Open Campus courses are non-credit reviews and tutorials and cannot be used to satisfy requirements in any curriculum at BPCC. (Beginning Algebra Course by Bossier Parish Community College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://bpcc.edu/opencampus/index.html.)

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Bossier Parish Community College
Author:
Gail Hendrix
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Behavioral Assessment and Intervention
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CC BY-NC
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This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and understanding of behavioral assessment and intervention strategies. Students will learn and review the fundamental principles that govern behavior according to behavioral and learning theorists. Students will then apply these principles of behavior to the classroom for assessment, intervention, and evaluation purposes. This course prepares students to use collaborative problem solving in the application of behavioral techniques.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Colin McDonald
Graciela Elizalde-Utnick
Date Added:
12/26/2020
Biomedical Engineering Design
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course presents a design philosophy and a design approach, dedicated to rehabilitation technology. This field was selected because of human-machine interaction is inherent and vital. Illustrative examples will be discussed by their entire design process

Subject:
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Reading
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
D.H. Plettenburg
Date Added:
02/03/2016
Breakwaters and Closure Dams
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Design and construction of breakwaters and closure dams in estuaries and rivers. Functional requirements, determination of boundary conditions, spatial and constructional design and construction aspects of breakwaters and dams consisting of rock, sand and caissons.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ir. H.J. Verhagen
Date Added:
03/03/2016
Bringing the Learning Home
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The project focused on the learning opportunities for Australian students inherent in the three different phases in the study abroad and exchange experience, namely pre-departure, in-country and re-entry. The project team sought to generate learning outcomes for the exchange process and to support the attainment of these outcomes through a wide range of OER, including lectures, workshops, videos, readings, student materials, and lesson plans. The learning materials were designed with Australian students in mind, but could be adapted for presentation on a wide range of campuses. The team especially sought to integrate student reflection on their learning experiences, including their photography and blogging, into refining project goals and producing appropriate teaching and learning materials.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Office of Learning and Teaching (Australia) + Murdoch University
Author:
Jan Gothard
Tonia Gray and Greg Downey
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Buddhist Art
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course serves as an introduction to the Buddhist artistic traditions of South, Southeast, and East Asia, as well as the Himalayas. It starts with the core tenets of Buddhism, Buddhist iconography, and early Buddhist art and architecture in India, then progresses to Southeast Asia. The course then focuses on Vajrayana Buddhism and its artistic traditions in the Himalayas, then examines Mahayana Buddhist art and architecture in China, Korea and Japan. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Buddhism, major Buddhist schools, and basic Buddhist iconography; identify major works of Buddhist art and Buddhist monuments from South, Southeast, and East Asia, as well as the Himalayas; identify the major developments in Buddhist doctrine and Buddhist art and architecture, as well as the relationship between the two as the religion spread throughout Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the Himalayas. (Art History 406)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
CASD 2231 Speech & Language Development
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CC BY-NC
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In this course, students will study the normal acquisition of speech and language in infants, children, and adolescents. Speech and language development will be studied in relation to the development of cognitive, perceptual, motor, emotional, and social skills. Theories of language acquisition and methods of assessing language will be discussed. The emergence of literacy in relation to language development will also be addressed. In addition, lectures will focus on cultural and linguistic variation in language acquisition. Class format will include lecture, organized discussion, and student presentations.

Subject:
Communication
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Baila Epstein
Colin McDonald
Date Added:
12/26/2020
CASD 2482 Introduction to Rehabilitative Audiology
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This OER (open educational resource) is made to be used while teaching Anatomy and physiology of the auditory mechanism, pathology of the ear, assessment of hearing using behavioral, electroacoustic and electrophysiological measures with related instrumentation; Interpretation of audiometric test results. Experiential clinical-related activities.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Dorothy DiToro
Date Added:
01/02/2021
CASD 7107 Advanced Language Acquisition
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course will involve the study of typically developing children, focusing on phonological, semantic, morphological, syntactic, and pragmatic development from pre-linguistic to complex language development. Major topics include contemporary models and key issues in typical speech-language acquisition, including the nature of language and its components, models and theories of language acquisition, and neurological, biological, cognitive, social-emotional, environmental, and cultural foundations of speech-language development. Students will engage in experiential learning activities that include collecting, transcribing, and analyzing children’s spontaneous speech-language samples. Bilingual and second language acquisition will be introduced. The impact of culture on language development will be infused throughout the course content. Class format will include lecture, organized discussion, group assignments, and student presentations.

Subject:
Languages
Special Education
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Bibliography
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Baila Epstein
Date Added:
09/08/2020
CASD 7337X Speech Sound Development and Disorders
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Phonological theory and research of typical articulation and phonological patterns; perceptual and motor development; phonological processes; evidence-based assessment and intervention; etiologies and characteristics of speech sound disorders; relationships to phonological awareness and literacy; culturally and linguistically appropriate practice.

Subject:
Communication
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Klara Marton
Date Added:
09/08/2020
CBSE 7401T Advanced Methodology and Practice in Middle Childhood Mathematics
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Emphasis on teaching and learning involving rational fractions, decimals and percents, measurement/geometry, probability and data interpretation. Interdisciplinary approaches involving mathematics and science, social studies and literacy. Diagnostic techniques, and adaptation of materials and methods for special needs learners. Introduction to research paradigms in mathematics education.

This course is one in a sequence of four education courses deigned for teachers specializing in mathematics in grades K-6. The first two courses (CBSE 7400T and CBSE 7401T) focus on research-based methodology for teaching mathematics and its use in the classroom. CBSE 7401T deals mainly with methodology for teaching topics related to rational numbers, decimals and percents measurement and geometry.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Case Study
Game
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Reading
Simulation
Syllabus
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Hanna Haydar
Date Added:
06/18/2020
CISC 3130 Data Structures
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Stacks and their implementations. Prefix, postfix, and infix notation. Queues and linked lists and their implementations. Binary and general trees and their implementations and traversals. Sorting and searching techniques. Graph algorithms.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Katherine Chuang
Date Added:
12/08/2020
CISC 3140 Design and Implementation of Software Applications II
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Overview of full-stack implementation of large scale web applications. Team-based software development methodologies, tools and practice. Introduction to modern HTML, CSS. Separation of structure, style and behavior. JavaScript, dynamic types, functional programming, prototypal classes, and closures. HTTP client-server communication, synchronous and asynchronous communication. Java Server Pages, simple database creation, programmatic queries and updates.

Primary objective of this course is to provide the student with the experience of working in a fast-track development environment that requires a shifting balance between collaboration and autonomy. The student will be exposed to a wide range of software tooling across multiple eras of computing history. The student should plan for a considerable amount of focused attention outside of the classroom to complete assignments. Online resources will be provided for all lecture topics. You will get more out of the course if you have experience with some larger development projects, for example, through internships, or open-source contributions.

Tied to "Tools and Techniques in Software Engineering" textbooks at the URL: https://opened.cuny.edu/courses/tools-and-techniques-in-software-engineering

Subject:
Computer Science
Computing and Information
Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Bibliography
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
CUNY
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Amy Wolfe
Katherine Chuang
Date Added:
12/08/2020
Campaigns and Elections
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this course, the student will explore campaigns and elections, learning their purpose and significance and observing the impact that they have on the American political system. The course will focus on the history and evolution of elections and voting laws in the United States, as well as what compels individuals to run for office and how campaigns are structured. Also, the course will teach the student the role that political parties, interest groups, voters, and the media play in elections. Lastly, the student will take a closer look at electoral outcomes and the impact that elections have on public policy after votes are counted, as well as what types of proposals could be implemented to improve our electoral system. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain the importance of elections, voting, democracy, and citizenship in the United States; describe the various types of elections that exist within the American political system; identify the legal and constitutional bases of campaigns and elections in the United States; explain the types of individuals that run for political office and why; analyze the influence of incumbency in elections; explain how candidates develop campaigns and financing; discuss the role of money in political campaigns; discuss the influence of political parties on campaigns and elections; describe the characteristics of the U.S. party system; explain the role of interest groups in influence campaigns and election outcomes; explain the various influences and motivations of the American voter; describe the factors associated with both nonvoter and voter disenfranchisement in contemporary elections; analyze and explain the critical role of the media in campaigns and elections; explain how election outcomes impact government actions and public policy; analyze both historical and contemporary election reforms. (POLSC333)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Chapter 1 Guided Notes for use with Concepts of Biology by Open Stax
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This resource has been created for my students enrolled in my Fundamentals of Biology course at West Hills Community College in Lemoore, CA.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Provider:
West Hills Community College
Author:
Bryon Spicci
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Compilers
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course introduces the compilation process, presenting foundational topics on formal languages and outline each of the essential compiler steps: scanning, parsing, translation and semantic analysis, code generation, and optimization. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: describe the compilation process and explain the function of the components that comprise the structure of a compiler; apply concepts of formal languages and finite-state machines to the translation of computer languages; identify the compiler techniques, methods, and tools that are applicable to other software applications; describe the challenges and state-of-the-practice of compiler theory and practice. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Computer Science 304)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/07/2019
Concord Consortium: Intermolecular Attractions
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This concept-building module contains a variety of simulations for exploring factors that cause molecules to attract each other. It was developed to help secondary students understand both polar and non-polar covalent bonding. Users can manipulate models to see how the strength of attraction is affected by distance from one molecule to another, by heating the substance, and by mixing polar and non-polar substances. Part II of the activity is devoted to hydrogen bonds, and explores why water is one of the most important molecules for life's existence. This item is part of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit research and development organization dedicated to transforming education through technology.

Subject:
Life Science
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
National Science Foundation
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
08/22/2011
Concord Consortium: Phase Change
Read the Fine Print
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This interactive activity for grades 8-12 features eight models that explore atomic arrangements for gases, solids, and liquids. Highlight an atom and view its trajectory to see how the motion differs in each of the three primary phases. As the lesson progresses, students observe and manipulate differences in attractions among atoms in each state and experiment with adding energy to produce state changes. More advanced students can explore models of latent heat and evaporative cooling. This item is part of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit research and development organization dedicated to transforming education through technology.

Subject:
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
05/11/2011
Congressional Politics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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In this course, the student will learn about the complexities of the legislative branch by examining the U.S. Congress in the American political system. This course will focus first on the history of Congress and the tension between Congress' competing representation and lawmaking functions by examining the structure of Congress, its original purpose, and the factors that influence how members of Congress act. The course will then take a careful look at the internal politics and law-making processes of Congress by learning the external competing interests that shape legislative outcomes and why Congressional rules are designed as they are. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how Congress was structured by the Framers of the Constitution; discuss how Congress is shaped by the U.S. Constitution; demonstrate an understanding of the importance of bicameralism in a representative body; compare and contrast features of the House and the Senate; explain the evolution of Congress as a modern institution; explain how congressional candidates run for office; discuss the importance of political parties in the recruitment of congressional candidates; identify the advantages and disadvantages of incumbency; define reapportionment and redistricting; assess the role of money and fundraising in congressional elections; compare and contrast how members of Congress fulfill their duties in their home districts and in Washington D.C; compare and contrast the leadership systems used in the House and Senate; describe the roles and functions of legislative leaders and political parties in Congress; name and describe the various types of congressional committees; explain why the committee system is central to an understanding of the legislative process; describe the major steps in a bill becoming a law; evaluate the influence of constituents, colleagues, political parties, and interest groups on congressional decision-making; assess the relationship between Congress and the president and its many permutations over time; analyze the pros and cons of united and divided government; explain the influence of the presidency on congressional elections; discuss the role of congressional oversight as it relates to both the presidency and the bureaucracy; identify the role played by Congress as it relates to the judicial branch; analyze the complicated relationship that exists between members of Congress and the media; analyze the role and performance of Congress in the budgetary process, economic policy, and foreign policy; explain the complications that arise as a result of shared foreign policy powers between Congress and the president; discuss how congressional policymaking has responded to post-9/11 governance; discuss the criticism of Congress, and assess the methods put forth to reform the institution. (Political Science 331)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Contemporary Art
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Contemporary art denotes a specific period of art starting in the 1960s that is characterized by a break from the modernist artistic canon and a desire to move away from the dominant Western cultural model, looking for inspiration in everyday and popular culture. This course focuses on Western art and culture, yet also explores a selection of contemporary art around the globe. The student will examine a variety of specific aesthetic and social issues and look at the different strategies contemporary artists proposed and used in their work. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify significant works of contemporary art and visual culture; describe the difference between modernist and contemporary works of art; explain the geographical shift of artistic centers from Europe (Paris) to the United States (New York), and then in the 21st century to a global spreading (Asia and Africa); define and discuss the development of contemporary art as a series of different cultural, social, and political inquiries over the past 50 years; identify and discuss multiple and vital relationships between contemporary art and such broader social and cultural issues as ideology, gender, race, or ethnicity; describe and explain a relationship between different contemporary art strategies, such as performance or installation, and their immediate social and cultural context; discuss how important contemporary artworks relate to their social and historical contexts; define contemporary art as a continuing, international artistic project; identify and define the importance of contemporary art and contemporary visual culture in today's increasingly globalized world. (Art History 408)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Contemporary Political Thought
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the major political theorists and their work from the 18th century to the present. Common themes seen in contemporary political thought include governance, property ownership and redistribution, free enterprise, individual liberty, justice, and responsibility for the common welfare. The student will read the works of theorists advocating capitalism, socialism, communism, egalitarianism, utilitarianism, social contract theory, liberalism, conservatism, neo-liberalism, neo-conservatism, libertarianism, fascism, anarchy, rational choice theory, and globalism. By studying the evolving constructs of political theory in the past two centuries, the student will gain insight into different approaches that leaders use to solve complex problems of governance and maintenance of social order. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: summarize the primary principles of capitalism, socialism, communism, egalitarianism, utilitarianism, social contract theory, liberalism, conservatism, neo-liberalism, neo-conservatism, libertarianism, fascism, anarchy, terrorism, rational choice theory, and globalism; identify major the political theorists from the 188h century to the present; discuss major political movements in their respective historical contexts; assess the impact that various political movements have had on law, economics, international relations, and society; analyze various primary sources of political theory and understand how these theories can be applied to solve problems in society; understand the challenges that modern leaders face in framing political debate and public policy. (Political Science 302)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/04/2019
Cultural and Literary Expression in Modernity
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course seeks to develop a nuanced understanding of the scope of cultural and literary expression in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries. It attends to broad socio-historical happenings, from the birth of modernism in the late 19th century to the post-modern moment. In addition to literary modernism, the course will also take a brief look at the cultural production of modernism in art, music, architecture, cinema, philosophy, and drama. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the terms modernism and modernity and explain the similarities and differences between these terms using specific works to illustrate comparison and contrast; List and explain the importance of a variety of social, cultural, and historical developments leading up to and occurring during the modern period; Cite and analyze the meaning of primary works of literature, poetry, art, music, architecture, cinema, philosophy and drama to illustrate the principle characteristics of modernism; Compare and contrast the literatures of both France and England from the start of the modern era (i.e., the turn of the twentieth century); Explain the impact of the Great War upon the development and expression of a variety of literary and artistic forms and especially on poetry in a number of genres; Describe the aftermath of World War I and its variety of effects upon literature and art and especially upon the poetry of T.S. Eliot and the novels of Virginia Woolf and Ernest Hemingway; Define High Modernism and give examples of the tenets, ideals, and even the contradictions and self-contradictions of this movement in history and literature (and especially in both its Irish and British contexts); Define the terms postmodernism and deconstruction as well as the phrase Magical Realism and identify the most important characteristics of the movements, fields, theories, and texts associated with these terms; Explain the premises of postcolonial literature and literary theory and identify, describe, compare, and contrast postcolonial texts from range of national origins. (English Literature 204)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Cultural and Literary Expression in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The period between the Renaissance and the Modern Era are referred to as the long 18th and 19th centuries, meaning that they span from around 1680-1830 and 1775-1910 - a time in which so many literary movements and cultural changes took place. In this course, the student will examine these formative cultural and literary developments such as the Enlightenment and Restoration Literature; the Rise of the Novel; Romanticism; and the Victorian Period. The student will identify and contextualize the principal characteristics of each of these movements/developments by reading representative texts. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the major literary trends of the 18th and 19th century, from Restoration comedy and satires through Victorian poetry and prose; outline the major developments in philosophical thought during the Enlightenment and identify these strains of thought in works like Voltarie's Candide; identify the factors that led to the rise of the novel as a literary form; identify the specific traits that characterize early sentimental, Gothic, and picaresque novel; describe the political factors that led to the popularity of Romanticism; describe the shift in thought that led to the split between Romanticism and Enlightenment; identify the themes, conventions, and tropes of Romantic poetry; define and explain the significance of the term/concept of ĺÎĺĺĺŤthe Romantic imagination; define the political, social, and economic factors that led to the surge in popular Victorian fiction; explain the significance of poetic experimentation in the 19th century works of writers like Tennyson, Hopkins, and Browning. (English Literature 203)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Dante
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this course, the student will consider Dante's literature for its stylistic and thematic contributions to the body of Medieval and Italian literature, as well as for its inventive appraisal of Christianity. First, the student will examine the context of Dante's life and works, followed by taking a look at some of Dante's shorter works. Then, the student will devote the majority of the course to the study of Dante's masterpiece,The Divine Comedy. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize Dante's philosophy on the use of language in literature; identify Dante's attitude towards the relationship between Church and State based on readings from his essays; complete an autobiographical reading of Dante's work, with attention to the influence that specific romantic, political, and religious aspects of his life had on his texts; define important terms related to the study of Dante's work specifically, the poetic devices on which he relied most frequently; identify the structural aspects of The Divine Comedy, and in particular discuss the importance of the overarching circular structure of the text; point to the major biblical, historical, and literary allusions in The Divine Comedy and discuss the significance of these references; perform a cogent reading of the important symbols in Dante's texts (i.e. the presence of light, fire, and roses); critically discuss the key themes in Dante's writings, such as the narrator as pilgrim, divine judgment, and the physical reality of hell. (English Literature 409)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Digitale Textedition mit TEI
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Das Tutorial Digitale Textedition mit TEI besteht aus einer Reihe von Kapiteln, die aufeinander aufbauend in die Kodierung und Edition von Texten nach den Guidelines der Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) einführen. Das Tutorial ist für den Einsatz in der Lehre konzipiert, kann aber auch im Selbststudium eingesetzt werden.

Jedes Kapitel behandelt einen bestimmten Aspekt des Themas und besteht jeweils aus drei Elementen: erstens aus einem Foliensatz für ein Inputreferat, das in die wichtigsten Begriffe und Elemente von TEI einführt; zweitens aus einem oder mehreren Aufgabenblättern, die zur praktischen Einübung des gelernten dienen; und drittens aus den diversen Materialien, die für die Bearbeitung der Aufgaben notwendig sind, bspw. digitale Faksimiles, XML-Dateien, und mehr.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Primary Source
Provider:
DARIAH-DE
Author:
Christof Schöch
Date Added:
03/06/2019
Discrete Mathematics
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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This course covered the mathematical topics most directly related to computer science. Topics included: logic, relations, functions, basic set theory, countability and counting arguments, proof techniques, mathematical induction, graph theory, combinatorics, discrete probability, recursion, recurrence relations, and number theory. Emphasis will be placed on providing a context for the application of the mathematics within computer science. The analysis of algorithms requires the ability to count the number of operations in an algorithm. Recursive algorithms in particular depend on the solution to a recurrence equation, and a proof of correctness by mathematical induction. The design of a digital circuit requires the knowledge of Boolean algebra. Software engineering uses sets, graphs, trees and other data structures. Number theory is at the heart of secure messaging systems and cryptography. Logic is used in AI research in theorem proving and in database query systems. Proofs by induction and the more general notions of mathematical proof are ubiquitous in theory of computation, compiler design and formal grammars. Probabilistic notions crop up in architectural trade-offs in hardware design.

Subject:
Computer Science
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
ArsDigita University
Provider Set:
ArsDigita University
Author:
Shai Simonson
Date Added:
03/04/2019